Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for L. Botwright > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by L. Botwright
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,783,304
Helpful Votes: 19

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
L. Botwright "Mrs B" (London)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Gorenje Baumatic Belling Fridge Freezer Door Bottle Shelf
Gorenje Baumatic Belling Fridge Freezer Door Bottle Shelf
Offered by Spares4Appliances
Price: £9.54

1.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality and keeps breaking, 9 Sept. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Second one we've purchased and both broke within a few weeks. Cheap plastic which is not fit for purpose.


Black Outdoor IP44 Rated Dusk till Dawn Photocell Light Sensor Detector Switch
Black Outdoor IP44 Rated Dusk till Dawn Photocell Light Sensor Detector Switch
Offered by The Light Factory
Price: £7.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor Product, 21 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I got an electrician to fit this product and the design is so poor he ended up fitting another product. Rubbish instructions and no way to hold down the top section. Would not recommend, spend a little more for a decent one.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 6, 2014 8:59 PM BST


Genuine Glass Back Replacement and Screwdriver for Apple iPhone 4 (Black)
Genuine Glass Back Replacement and Screwdriver for Apple iPhone 4 (Black)

1.0 out of 5 stars Buyers beware, 21 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Didn't provide the correct tool to undertake the job and despite emailing them and promises to send, no tool. Absolute waste of money and certainly would not recommend.


Toxic Childhood: How The Modern World Is Damaging Our Children And What We Can Do About It
Toxic Childhood: How The Modern World Is Damaging Our Children And What We Can Do About It
by Sue Palmer
Edition: Paperback

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strikes a blow against middle class complacency!, 16 Dec. 2011
As an experienced educator, Sue Palmer is appalled by the apparent decline in children's ability over the last twenty years. She has noticed poorer concentration, language and listening skills. Equally, the sharp rise in developmental and mental health problems amongst children has motivated her to research this book and identify a toxic cocktail of factors damaging our children's brains and seriously hindering our children's true potential.
Pulling together many uncomfortable truths about parenting today, this book goes further than criticising the usual lax attitudes to discipline, bedtime and diet amongst demoralised parents. I'm good at all those! But as a working mother, it struck a horrible chord against my own complacency by articulating just how seriously we have devalued childcare across all stratas of western society. I identified with the tired,over-worked parents she descibes, who love their children, but are failing them by being too busy to communicate and connect fully. From one middle class mother juggling a baby in one hand and a Blackberry in the other, to the next parent using Cbeebies as a full-time baby-sitter whilst working from home or tackling the myriad of modern domestic tasks, these are very common scenarios.
Yet I found Sue Palmer sympathetic; she offers practical advice, from moving the TV out of the bedroom to tips on helping young children play safely outside. She recognises that this is the first generation to be brought up within an electronic, global village and suggests a basic framework for how modern parenting can evolve positively in the context of such huge cultural change.


Never Let Me Go
Never Let Me Go
by Kazuo Ishiguro
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Master of Understatement, 3 Mar. 2007
This review is from: Never Let Me Go (Paperback)
Ishiguro has a unique and masterly style in his ability to convey deep emotion in his own understated way. In Remains of the Day, Ishiguro captured a portrait of a repressed and sublimated individual living in 20th century inter-war Britain. In Never Let Me Go, Ishiguro has re-created all the understated tension and repressed emotion, in a completely different dystopian horror novel. We are introduced to a chilling society (reminiscent of Atwood's Handmaid's Tale) where a certain sub-section of people must devote their lives to others higher up the social scale. Written in the first person, Kathy tells us her story of growing up in an institution and of learning the true horror of her destiny. Yet what is horrifying to us in downplayed throughout the novel by Kathy. Socialised throughout her childhood by the Guardians, she writes in a matter of fact way, as indeed she would do if she had been brought up to know of no other fate.

The story focuses entirely upon the experiences of Kathy and her friends, and we are left to draw our own conclusions about the politics of a society that can behave so mercilessly. Kathy would have been allowed no wider knowledge about the world, since this would have made her question her role within it. Indeed, her glimpses into the outside world are heartbreaking. As a massive fan of social science fiction books such as Brave New World and 1984, I would love to have learned more about the political and social side. Yet I understand that Ishiguro was not writing a political thriller, but a psychological insight into a troubled individual, albeit from a morally aghast point of view.

It has been said many times, that much of Ishiguro's talent lies in what he leaves out rather than in what he says, yet I still wanted to cry out: Why?! Why is there no mention of rebellion? Is socialisation such a powerful tool that it can compel an individual to give up their life without a murmur? This novel provokes many questions and would be great for a reading group. It is a brilliant book that I could have devoured easily in one sitting. I highly recommend it.


Desperately Seeking Snoozing: The Insomnia Cure from Awake to Zzzz
Desperately Seeking Snoozing: The Insomnia Cure from Awake to Zzzz
by John Wiedman
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Adding my praise..., 17 Mar. 2006
I would like to add my praise for this wonderful book that helped me through a mercifully short, but debilitating case of insomnia. By his own admission, this guy is not a writer, but his style is funny, frank and endearing in its sincere attempt to help you out of your misery. His solution is actually very simple, and after all the build up, you think, is that it? BUT, it works. I have applied his guidelines ever since and have yet to have endured another bad night.


Page: 1