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RM-Series Replacement Remote Control For DGM CSPOTHXX3264RCS
RM-Series Replacement Remote Control For DGM CSPOTHXX3264RCS
Offered by cherrypickelectronics
Price: £11.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent product and service., 7 Aug. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Inexpensive but functional, this product worked "straight out of the box". A much-needed replacement that has given new lease of life to the TV. Free delivery and arrived as advertised, well wrapped. Excellent service - great product at great price!


Mrs Hudson and the Spirits' Curse (Holmes & Hudson Mystery Book 1)
Mrs Hudson and the Spirits' Curse (Holmes & Hudson Mystery Book 1)
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A jolly fine read, Dr Watson ........., 19 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A fast-moving tale in the style and period of Conan Doyle, this book contains exotic FarEast mystery embedded in the foggy murky underworld of London. The author succeeds in spinning a subtle interweave of storylines and introduces Mrs Hudson as the pragmatic power behind the intellectual Holmes. A new heroine is also introduced to great effect in the maid Flottie, surely to remain a constant presence in future Holmes cases. To mimic the language and style of Victorian London to such great effect is a wonderful achievement. I enjoyed this book immensely, and recommend it to all Sherlock fans and to people keen to be introduced to fresh tales from the great detective and his sidekicks.


Bottleneck - Our human interface with reality: The disturbing and exciting implications of its true nature
Bottleneck - Our human interface with reality: The disturbing and exciting implications of its true nature
by Richard Epworth
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stimulating and enjoyable., 5 Aug. 2014
In writing “Bottleneck”, Richard Epworth has exposed many earlier presumptions about the information rate that the human mind can absorb through the body’s primary sensory inputs. He does so using rigorous scientific analyses that he has honed through many years of experience as a leading research scientist within the field of electronic and optical communications. He eloquently takes the reader through the concepts of information rates as applied to audio, visual and other sensory stimuli, and describes the fundamentals expressed in Shannon’s Theorem – the baseline for understanding all communications. Basing all measurements in bits per second, he comes to the surprising conclusion that the human mind demonstrates a very strict limitation in the amount of new information it can absorb at any instant. This limitation he calls the “Bottleneck”. This observation is distinctly at odds with the preconceived view that humans could be differentiated from other species by their capacity to retain, absorb and process huge amounts of information. Indeed, he deduces that other animals can outperform humans in most things other than in our capacity to make predictions and plan ahead.

Dr Epworth uses much data from other authors – and his own extensive technical experience – relating to different sensory inputs and situations (from, for example speed-memory exponents, chimpanzees, savants, blind people and children as they learn and develop), to support his contention. After providing a convincing argument for his proposition, he then goes on to explain the ramifications of this new understanding. Being such a deviation from the accepted norm, the implications are indeed significant, but I will leave the reader to alight on, and chew over, these issues.

This book is particularly thought-provoking, and it is sufficiently wide-ranging and discursive to encourage the reader their own questions and musings. I for one find it difficult to believe that, in the moment, the visual data input level is just a few bits/second, because my perception is different, with vivid, fast-changing and almost continuous stimulation. I would rather alternatively consider that the visual data throughput and absorption is high, but the overall retention diminishes to just equivalent to a few bits per second according to some gradation of the importance of the experience. Perhaps this is just saying the same thing in a slightly different way? However, his thesis can be applied to a wide range of scenarios. For example, recently I heard of an approach called “mindfulness”, where a pain sufferer concentrates on all of their sensory experiences at one time to essentially “flood” the brain with data. This seems to lead to a rationing of sensory data-rates, and a consequent diminution of the single channel carrying the pain signals. The book provides a new perspective on such different scenarios, and therefore provides a good reference-point to understanding the world as we experience it.

A major joy of the book is how Dr Epworth has related the findings to his own childhood and adulthood. This open, frank, humorous and touching account is very refreshing and quite unexpected for a hard-nosed engineer to recount. Through his many anecdotes and examples, Dr Epworth makes the book entertaining as well as informative. He is not afraid to expose the reader to a softer side as a counterpoint to his hard scientific persona. For example, tales of the “denture sensor” and the “Glaswegian lecturer” will long stick in the mind. Additionally, he confidently ventures into fields that are not natural for a physicist to inhabit – philosophy, sociology, religion, mortality, human frailty and strengths relative to other animals, robotics, the nature of intelligence and child development, to name but a few. I was very pleased that he tried to address such issues as faith and morality rather than give them up as too difficult or foreign for him, as a scientist, to address.

“Bottleneck” is a very enjoyable and stimulating book that I would wholeheartedly recommend.


All-Green 5 Litre Plastic Kitchen Compost Caddy, Silver/ Grey
All-Green 5 Litre Plastic Kitchen Compost Caddy, Silver/ Grey
Price: £6.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars You can't go wrong!, 14 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you want a sturdy inconspicuous grey-green box to put compost stuff in, this is your boy! Like that it clicks closed and they give a free liner bag to try it out. It works, it comes quick, and is quite, quite lovely! Bit like me really.


Premier Housewares Squares Kitchen Roll Holder - Chrome
Premier Housewares Squares Kitchen Roll Holder - Chrome
Offered by ndlwholesale
Price: £8.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantabulissimo!, 14 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent quality and design, came pronto in good packaging, and it worked first time! As good as Bonzo Dog do-dah Band!


PELTEC@ Premium Laptop Battery 4,400mAh for Asus BTP-52EW / BTP-89BM / BTP-89-BM / BTP-90-BM / 805-N-00005 / Fujitsu-Siemens-Amilo M7400 / Pro V2000 / Maxdata Pro 7000x / Medion MD42200 / MD95072 / MD95300
PELTEC@ Premium Laptop Battery 4,400mAh for Asus BTP-52EW / BTP-89BM / BTP-89-BM / BTP-90-BM / 805-N-00005 / Fujitsu-Siemens-Amilo M7400 / Pro V2000 / Maxdata Pro 7000x / Medion MD42200 / MD95072 / MD95300

4.0 out of 5 stars It is A1!, 14 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Got it out of the packaging, slotted it in and it worked! Came in a couple of days. What's more to like!


Salazar
Salazar

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive debut., 14 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Salazar (Kindle Edition)
Salazar, by Seth Lynch. This is a great debut novel by Mr Lynch, introducing a new private detective character in a fast-paced tale of 30's Paris criminal intrigue. Using rapid one-liners and tight dialogue, the style is reminiscent of Raymond Chandler, mixed with a geographical chase around the Parisian underworld extending out to rural France, in a sort of "Dan Brown expeditionary" mode. With vivid imagery, he takes us through the angst-ridden world of Salazar to his squalid world of downtrodden private detective, caught up in the low-life of Paris. The story-line expands and eventually develops into an explosive ending that holds the reader gripped in the tale until the last page. Coincidentally, knowing well the parts of France where the story unfolds, I realize that this book has been meticulously researched, and the pictures painted and the setting of the characters are perfectly described and richly amplified. Lynch has created a lead character in Salazar that is up there with the Colombos and the Wallanders of this genre, and I look forward impatiently to the second book, in what I'm sure will be a long-lived series.


Campingaz AC/DC Transformer
Campingaz AC/DC Transformer
Offered by Trackpack
Price: £22.98

4.0 out of 5 stars Works well, 22 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A robust bit of kit that works well. Copes with the load demand easily. Does what it says on the tin.


Minky Peg Bag Leaf, Green
Minky Peg Bag Leaf, Green
Price: £4.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Functional, but a bit expensive, 16 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This works OK but is a bit expensive for what it is. The velcro sealing strip inside the flap is annoying when accessing and filing the bag.


Rummikub Original - Manufactured by HASBRO
Rummikub Original - Manufactured by HASBRO
Offered by Bargains 4 Ever
Price: £27.99

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but big, 26 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Ideal for people with poorer eyesight, this version benefits from large tiles and holders. However, it is not good as a travel companion because of its bulk. For travel we later bought the Rummikub "Kompact" version.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 9, 2014 4:03 AM GMT


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