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C. C. Williams
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This Was: Remastered
This Was: Remastered
Offered by A ENTERTAINMENT
Price: £14.97

41 of 46 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The early sound of a band who went on to better things, 27 Sept. 2001
This review is from: This Was: Remastered (Audio CD)
Everybody knows that Tull started off as a blues band. This wasn't exactly an original thing to be in 1968 and, indeed, by the time of the album's release the band's sound had moved on, hence the title 'This Was'. As a blues band, Jethro Tull were OK - a sight better than the dreary likes of Chicken Shack, Ten Years After or Savoy Brown. 'Beggar's Farm' is a most effective song and the opening track 'My Sunday Feeling' even had a spate as a Northern Soul dance floor filler after I played it to a DJ friend. Despite the incomprehensible lyrics, 'Song For Jeffrey' is also excellent and notable for some tasty slide work by Mick Abrahams. Other songs are standard blues fare or overlong instrumentals; not bad overall but far from great. The additional tracks are welcome. 'One For John Gee' isn't very good but sure is hard to come by. 'Love Story', the band's last recording with Mick Abrahams, is already in a very different style to 'This Was' while 'Christmas Song', a more-or-less solo performance from Ian Anderson was indicative of a new folkier direction.
I have to say something about the packaging of these new remasters: 4/10 to Chrysalis for a total lack of effort. Sure, they're not as bad as the old CDs (which were simply shabby beyond belief) but they're still not good - indifferent front artwork, no photos, press cuttings or lyrics and only skeletal notes (though penned by Ian Anderson which is good).


Stand Up
Stand Up
Price: £5.99

10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent album, style still immature, 27 Sept. 2001
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This review is from: Stand Up (Audio CD)
This album sees Tull in transition between their blues beginnings and the invidualistic musical path that they would later take. Martin Barre was (then) an inexperienced guitarist and much of the guitar work on the album is Ian Anderson's acoustic strumming. Even though the quality of the production leaves a little to be desired there are some immortal Tull classics on offer here: 'A New Day Yesterday', 'Bourée', 'Fat Man'. 'We Used To Know' is a guitar tour-de-force and Martin's most assured performance on the album. The Eagles unconsciously used its chord progression on 'Hotel California' which I'd never noticed until Ian Anderson pointed it out when they played the song live. 'Reasons For Waiting' and 'Look Into The Sun' showcase Ian's songwriting talents and are achingly beautiful. It's only the plodding nature of 'Nothing Is Easy' and the indulgence of 'For A Thousand Mothers' that prevent this album from getting 5 stars. The extra tracks from the two singles are welcome: 'Living In The Past' and (especially) 'Sweet Dream' are wonderful songs and although their B-sides were indifferent, '17' is not available other than on the original 7".


MySQL & mSQL
MySQL & mSQL
by George Reese
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Thorough and readable, 17 July 2001
This review is from: MySQL & mSQL (Paperback)
Covers two DBMSes for the price of one! This could actually be the only reference required for all your database needs as it covers installation (and maybe building from source) administration, SQL and all manner of APIs to the DBMSes (for Perl, Python, C/C++, Java, PHP). Complaints? Not many - it needs updating as some of the information is now out of date, I can't see the point in covering mSQL as it is way behind MySQL in terms of features and sometimes the book strays beyond its remit. Overall, though, very good.


Java Network Programming (Java (O'Reilly))
Java Network Programming (Java (O'Reilly))
by Elliotte Rusty Harold
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Learned, readable and packed with information, 17 July 2001
One of the best Java books out there. Earlier, I tried the Java network programming book from Manning Publications but it wasn't a patch on this. It covers everything from basic sockets communications to sophisticated client / server applications to SSL to content handlers, not to mention RMI and Internet mail. Heck, even the section which covers simple I/O is one of the best I've read. Simply outstanding.


Java Internationalization
Java Internationalization
by Andrew Deitsch
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.23

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best Java books around, 17 July 2001
Among the many, many great things about Java is its enhanced support for multiple languages and locales. Nevertheless, adding I18N (that's the buzzword for internationalization, folks) and L10N (localization) support to your applications is still non-trivial. That's where this book comes in: it tells you how to use the features built into the language (such as resource bundles and the Locale class) as well as handling really difficult cases: languages that read from right to left (and top to bottom!), dealing with multiple scripts, rendering multilingual text and more. A wealth of reference material makes the book even more worthwhile. The authors also make what could be a dry topic highly readable. Top marks! Great book!


Learning GNU Emacs (A Nutshell handbook)
Learning GNU Emacs (A Nutshell handbook)
by Debra Cameron
Edition: Paperback

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, badly needs updating, 17 July 2001
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This is a fine and informative book, well structured and easy to read. However, the version of Emacs under consideration, 19.29, is some way behind the current release. I'd like any update to cover NT Emacs as well.


Undocumented Windows NT
Undocumented Windows NT
by Prasad Dabak
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative and erudite, 16 April 2001
This book goes further into Windows NT than almost anything else currently on the market. Some of the topics covered are also discussed in books on NT kernel mode programming but most are not. Some of the topics covered are also limited in their usefulness (e.g. walking through your process' page tables) but most show you how to do things so cool that you just want to add them to your own code. This is a simply excellent book. It loses a star, however, for not covering NTFS which remains an unknown area (although it is covered to some degree in Gary Nebbett's 'Windows NT/2000 Native API Reference'). Also, the typesetters have screwed up the format of the code samples which is something that might be fixed in a future edition.


Windows NT/2000: Native API Reference
Windows NT/2000: Native API Reference
by Gary Nebbett
Edition: Paperback
Price: £37.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scholarly and thorough, 16 April 2001
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Leafing through this book, you can imagine the days and weeks spent with Soft-Ice and a checked build of Windows NT patiently and meticulously coaxing the secrets out of the world's least well-documented operating system. It is rather dry and could do with more code examples but is otherwise first rate. For best results mix with 'Undocumented Windows NT' by Prasad Dabak et al.


Assembly Language for Intel-Based Computers
Assembly Language for Intel-Based Computers
by Kip R. Irvine
Edition: Hardcover

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent guide, perhaps the best there is, 16 April 2001
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This is the most complete guide to Intel Assembly Language that I've come across. Most Assembler books suffer from being years out of date and making the curious assumption that you couldn't possibly want to program anything higher than a 286. Irvine's book is both reasonably current and acknowledges that we live in a 32-bit world. Heck, it even covers programming the x87 FPU which is something that other authors presume that you would never dream of doing. There are some complaints about the content, however. Much of the DOS-based material is now so outdated as to be useless and many of the programming examples might be better as Win32 console applications. I would like to see video displays more advanced than standard VGA addressed as well. Generally, however, the content is comprehensive and well explained. The comparatively useless 'Assembler Insde And Out' was given away free with Microsoft MASM 6.11. MASM 6.11 is given away free with 'Assembly Language for Intel-based Computers'. Do you need any further reason to buy this excellent book?


Programmer's Guide to Internet Mail: SMTP, POP, IMAP, and LDAP (HP Technologies)
Programmer's Guide to Internet Mail: SMTP, POP, IMAP, and LDAP (HP Technologies)
by John Rhoton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £59.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not bad at all - the best book on programming email?, 31 Mar. 2001
Vey thorough in its coverage of protocols, including DNS, LDAP and ASN.1 along with the usual suspects (SMTP, POP, IMAP, MIME, etc.). The choice of Visual Basic for code samples is, er, unusual but easy enough to follow. The text is clear, although the presentation is a bit dodgy at times.


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