Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle New Album - Foo Fighters Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for K.SPARK > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by K.SPARK
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,263,486
Helpful Votes: 11

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
K.SPARK

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Plants Vs Zombies: Garden Warfare (Xbox 360)
Plants Vs Zombies: Garden Warfare (Xbox 360)
Offered by Online Entertainment Warehouse
Price: £16.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dont trust what u see on amazon, 19 Sept. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This game states the age rating is 7. I've just received the game, way too late than it should've arrived, and it doesn't even match the what's advertised on here. It's age 10 rating and doesn't even work. £20 wasted!!!!!!


WOMENS LADIES KNITTED CROCHET BOLERO SHRUGS CARDIGAN SHORT SLEEVES TOP SIZE 8-18[Black,18-20 (UK 16-18) (EU 44-46) (US 12-14)]
WOMENS LADIES KNITTED CROCHET BOLERO SHRUGS CARDIGAN SHORT SLEEVES TOP SIZE 8-18[Black,18-20 (UK 16-18) (EU 44-46) (US 12-14)]
Offered by Eliza Online
Price: £5.35

1.0 out of 5 stars Poor material, 24 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Ive only worn this 3 times and its completely dropped to bits after its 2nd wash. Just got it out of the washer and it's not even suitable to wear again. £8.99 you would think it would be better quality.


The Bank Manager and the Bum
The Bank Manager and the Bum
Price: £1.14

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enchanting and powerful work., 20 Sept. 2013
With "The Bank manager and the Bum", the Godfather of the Longcroft has joined ranks with the Quicksilver writers and broken out of the genre straitjacket with a captivating and magical book, a book that sings with hope and terror and awe. It is also a book shot through by the uncanny, that unsettling realisation we get when we realise (to contradict Wittgenstein) THIS world is not "all that is the case".
Mr Sant has always been the Brit Grit naturalist par excellence; his Longcroft tales fizz with a stark realism and laconic fatalism; they are the Icelandic sagas set against kebab shop and estate boozer. Violence is the chief arbiter of change. Life is a struggle against the wolves of humankind and, more to the point, against yourself and your weaknesses. It is a place without miracles, a solid material world as remorseless in its machinery as Zola's Paris or Frank Bill's Indiana.
In his new book, "The Bank Manager and the Bum," Mr Sant brings a spark of the otherworld to his weltunschauung; a down and out-er possessed of a miraculous gift appears among the dispossessed and selfish, the drunks, addicts and gangsters as ominously and as powerfully as a phone call at four in the morning. The work reminds me of the TV show Heroes, in that the appearance of a gifted individual leads to the abuse of that individual's special talent by the powerful and the desperate alike. The miracle is seen, and the first thought that strikes the witnesses is "how can this benefit me?" Sant remains, as always, a sardonic and cutting satirist of the human condition, but among the pages of this book, lays a possible new mode for the writer: something a little more mysterious, poetic and numinous is at work here. As the titular Bum remarks towards the end of the book "Fight the darkness...feel the light." And what a light it is.

The writing as always is sharp, proficient and hard-edged, with an evocative descriptive flair and the characters are well drawn and vivid, but it is the ease with which he has blended fantasy and his own brand of realismus that is the true achievement here, and one I envy thoroughly. Highly recommended and as I post this, currently free.


Shieldwall
Shieldwall
Price: £6.99

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful and profound book, 31 May 2013
This review is from: Shieldwall (Kindle Edition)
Most historical novels you read are kind of the literary equivalent of a waxwork museum, or a costume drama. Reading them, you're always aware that the author's looking back at the era through 21st century glasses, and the portrait is unintentionally shaded by our time, it's prejudices and tastes. "Shieldwall" is different; it's a heck of an imaginative feat, how can I explain it? Justin Hill captures an England just about to emerge from the dark ages, the radiance and the terror of an England at once primal in its unspoiled beauty and in the savagery of war. He writes a vivid prose, that manages a hard Anglo-Saxon realism and a poetry that is all his, and the characters after 20 pages or so, become people we know as deeply as we've known anyone, and I can think of no higher praise for a writer than that. "Shieldwall" is a kind of necromancy; Mr. Hill has brought the voice of Old England back from the darkness, and I recommend the book utterly.


Tales From The Longcroft 2 (Tales From The Longcroft Estate)
Tales From The Longcroft 2 (Tales From The Longcroft Estate)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A single Lonely Gap - Tales from the Longcroft 2, by Darren Sant, 9 May 2013
Corot said "Art is nature as seen through a temperament.", and Darren Sant's Tales from the Longcroft is just that, the natural cycle of the human animal viewed through the bleak tenderness of the author's temperament. The Longcroft is a prism through which we see the fractured, beaten down human animal Cameron and his predecessors have sentenced to a brutal relentless drudgery in the former council gulags lingering at the fringes of any town UK. It is a bleak view; Loan sharks prey on those drowning in the economic meltdown; the estate is hell, fuelled by drugs, tribalism, vengeance and violence, and honest businessmen are victims of Temple, the crime kingpin. Temple, the name is an ingenious stroke of the author's, bringing to mind, as it does, biblical temples, the body as a temple, and the idea that this shadowy figure represents the modern worlds true holy place. He is the personification of a selfish, relentlessly acquisitive society where the goal doesn't matter, nothing is strived for, all that counts is to keep the money rolling in. As a shark perishes if it ceases to swim, the relentless scrabbling in the dark is what keeps the Longcroft alive, whether it be drugs, the pub, a beating or two, money piled up for the sake of money piling up.
Old soldier Ernest, whose lovingly treasured service revolver provides the hammer blow in the first section, is perhaps my favorite character. Viewing religion as a false consolation, he clings to vengeance, to weregeld. His granddaughter's death by overdose reawakens the man whose wartime murderousness earned him the epithet 'eagle-eye'. His impending death allows him the freedom of action enjoyed by the likes of Hargreaves. The most morbid deadline of all crushes a half century of civilization out of him. No man knows whom he really is until he has faced his own destruction; that is when we come face to face with ourselves. Some of us find ourselves to be cowards, some heroes, some of us think of the one thing we regret, the friends betrayed, the one woman with whom we should have always been, some, perhaps, find nothing in themselves but a pounding heart, an animal bolting from darkness. Ernest finds a killer.
The remainder of the book deals with racism, football hooliganism and violence in a masterful sequence of events flashing back to the 70's and forward again in a bold experimental manner that I found refreshing and masterfully done. The construction was a risk, and could very easily have thrown off the pacing and narrative drive, but Sant, with the assured touch of the natural writer and with an author's control over his material, pulls it off with ease. I wish more writers were as bold; myself included. A generation brought up by Hollywood, we seem to have the three act linear story in our blood, and it's something against which we should rebel.
Sant's style is a straight reportage mixed with the dos Passos 'God's eye view', swooping down on the Longcroft, presenting us with the characters and their choices without commentary, allowing us to decide the meaning for ourselves. Some might find the Longcroft harsh medicine, but one I recommend; see the world as it is, be brave and read on.
I look forward to more from the author; the Devil's gate drive sequence and the 1970's set chapters hint at the treasures yet to come. I would love to read a 70's set novel by Sant; it would be an English "Mean Streets" and if anyone could write it, Darren is the man.
I'll leave you with a quote from my favorite part of the book. "He briefly admired the war medals that he kept there. A single lonely gap between them with just a ribbon showing where he had lost one."
Courage. Loss. Vengeance. Welcome to the Longcroft.


A Scattering of Ashes
A Scattering of Ashes
by Mr Craig Douglas
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tales from the frontline, 26 Feb. 2013
This review is from: A Scattering of Ashes (Paperback)
With this collection Craig Douglas has said something important about the extremes of Human experience, whether it be of war, of hope, of fear or of betrayal. You feel, reading these collected stories that you're experiencing something different; this is a man who has lived the things he writes about, and therefore his voice is authentic, sometimes brutally so, in a way most other authors can only aspire towards. His is an individual voice, irrepressible, beyond emulation, that deserves to be heard. That he is a born writer, with a deep love of the craft, is without question. He has served at the frontline, in more ways than one, and these are his dispatches from the trenches; authentic, troubling, stark and shot through with the sparks of a true talent. These stories deserve a place in your life. Check them out.


Tales From The Longcroft (Tales From The Longcroft Estate Book 1)
Tales From The Longcroft (Tales From The Longcroft Estate Book 1)

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Longcroft's long shadow, 23 Sept. 2012
In his collection, "Tales from The Longcroft", Darren Sant has created an English "Last Exit To Brooklyn"; each character stands out against the hard clear landscape delineated with the utmost care and artistry by the author; you know these people, you know the squalor and the hope and the violence of their lives as well as you know anyones. The estate, Man's Estate (to borrow the english title of Malraux's 'Condition Humaine'), reflects the larger savagery of the modern world, from the mayor, caught up in the trivialities of his wife's social round, to the predatory self-defeating greed of Taff, the loan shark. The promise of community, of selflessness, represented by Alf and the other residents of Bradley Gardens, who come out in support of a young woman caught in Taff's clutches, is negated by the Cullens and their rule by violence. It is a bleak vision of a world where man is always wolf to man, where any solidarity is undermined by the selfish thrusts of violence and the lust for power, something the author represents briliantly by the use of an SS Oberst's ceremonial blade, which is called to play in a pivotal scene. The blade reminds us of the price of unchecked Wille zur Macht, and of the terrible darkness in all of us that Mr. Sant has so evocativally and beautifully captured. I absolutely recommend you buy a copy today and dig into it deeply.


Page: 1