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squirrel

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Gold Leaf Ladies Dry Touch Gardening Gloves
Gold Leaf Ladies Dry Touch Gardening Gloves
Price: £19.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars nice gloves, but sizing is a bit limited, 16 Mar. 2015
I've just been bought a pair of these and they seem like lovely gloves but unfortunately the ladies size is a bit too short in the fingers for me. I haven't tried the mens, though I suspect they'll be rather too large. A little disappointed that sizes seems to be limited to generic "ladies" and "mens" rather than small, medium and large.


The Wool Trilogy: Wool, Shift, Dust
The Wool Trilogy: Wool, Shift, Dust
Price: £9.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant dystopian post-apocalyptic sci-fi, 12 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A brilliant read, Howie describes an all too plausible world in the not too distant future with interesting characters and a plot that slowly reveals itself to become a real page-turner. There are some of the usual dystopian features such as a strict hierarchical social structure where those in charge manipulate and control the populace and people are discouraged or even punished for questioning their lot, but its far less bleak than 1984 or Brave New World.
The residents' acceptance of a relatively low tech approach to much of day to day silo life provides an interesting contrast to the technology and infrastructure required to actually construct the silo in the first place and this is an idea that develops as the story progresses.
The WOOL trilogy should appeal to anyone who enjoys a good read, not limited just to sci-fi enthusiasts.


Silo 49: Going Dark
Silo 49: Going Dark
Price: £0.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent fan fiction, 12 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I really enjoyed this, Christy brings her own ideas into the Silo world created by Hugh Howie whilst maintaining the essence of the original series.


The Jupiter Paradox
The Jupiter Paradox
Price: £0.99

2.0 out of 5 stars good ideas but rather disappointing read, 12 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Some promising ideas but overall I found that the story lacked depth. There is very little description of characters or events and the plot stumbles along rather clumsily, with apparently significant events such as a major battle that results in the capture of an enemy leader and the re-taking of a city given little more attention that my own brief paragraph here.
The dialogue between characters is also very stilted and wooden, which could work as a great illustrative characteristic of the logic driven, unemotional cyborg mentality but unfortunately it extends to the human characters too so I have to conclude that it wasn't an intentional feature.
This could be a great book (and I'd love to read a revised version) but at present it reads rather more like a first draft than the finished product.


Dormice (British Natural History Series)
Dormice (British Natural History Series)
by Pat Morris
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars informative and easy to read, 6 July 2011
This book has some really good information about dormouse ecology and is very easy to read. Definitely on the reading list for anyone who wants to learn about this species.


Microsoft Natural Ergo Keyboard 4000 - UK Layout
Microsoft Natural Ergo Keyboard 4000 - UK Layout
Offered by 3-Monkeys
Price: £29.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, though spacebar took a bit of getting used to, 5 July 2011
I developed RSI and carpal tunnel syndrome a couple of years ago, mainly from computer use, and switching from a normal keyboard to this ergonomic one has made a huge (positive) difference to my symptoms.
I did have some issues with the spacebar initially - as other reviewers have pointed out it does not depress properly when pressed at the edge of the key. As a touch typist I did find this quite irritating, but with a little perseverence I very quickly got used to the slightly different thumb position required and I haven't had any problem with that since.


Jill Gordon's Cross Stitch Pictures (Crafts)
Jill Gordon's Cross Stitch Pictures (Crafts)
by Jill Gordon
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars worth buying for the peacock pattern alone, 5 July 2011
I bought book this purely for the peacock pattern, which looks stunning when finished. I'd seen the peacock elsewhere for about £25 as a printed chart and about £50 for a complete kit, so I was delighted to find it in this book for just a fraction of that price.
I only like about half of the other pictures but you could easily pick out some nice elements like flowers or butterflies to use as motifs on embroidered cards or something like that.


Eolo 3D Pop-Up Dragon Kite
Eolo 3D Pop-Up Dragon Kite

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good novelty kite, 5 July 2011
Simple and sturdy enough for my 8yr old nephew to put together and fly - has a simple pull cord mechanism to make the 3d body pop up and flatten again when you're ready to put it away. Needs a reasonable amount of wind to get it up but it looks great in the air.
I bought this as a budget version of another 3d dragon kite that we'd seen at a kite festival. For me, I've have spent the extra and got the fancier one, but I think this one is really good value for the kids.


Dragon Keeper (The Rain Wild Chronicles, Book 1)
Dragon Keeper (The Rain Wild Chronicles, Book 1)
by Robin Hobb
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a bit disappointing, 5 July 2011
The story picks up directly from the end of the Liveship Traders, beginning with the hatching of the dragons in the Rain Wilds and rapidly moving on a few years to find the city struggling to cope with the realities of the young dragons. This leads to the rather desperate expedition to rehome the dragons in the lost ancient city of Kelsingra, though none can know whether that city survived the cataclysm that destroyed the rest of their civilisation. Unless that is you've read the Liveship Traders, in which case you'll already know the answer to that question and the story rapidly loses a major element of mystery/suspense and becomes rather predictable.

I did enjoy the insight into the mundanities of everyday life of the Rain Wilds, which were regarded with a sense dark mystery and magic by the Bingtowners of the Liveship books. I also liked that some of the familiar Liveships characters made brief appearances as it lent a sense of continuity to the two stories but overall I found that the book lacked the depth and complexity of Hobb's other novels. Its worth reading (and Dragon Haven, which is the 2nd half of the story) but it isn't on a par with her other books.


Dragon Haven (The Rain Wild Chronicles, Book 2)
Dragon Haven (The Rain Wild Chronicles, Book 2)
by Robin Hobb
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars good story, but not on a par with Hobb's other books, 5 July 2011
I like Robin Hobb's stories and while I enjoyed the Rainwild Chronicles I didn't think it matched the standard of the Liveship Traders. The expedition to search for the lost city of Kelsingra lost some of its suspense and mystery in that while the characters involved don't know whether the city still exists, the reader does because the dragon Tintaglia has already been there (that might have been in the Liveship Traders books) so the tale has a fairly predictable conclusion.
I was also rather disappointed with the way the ending is written. The story is told from the perspective of various different characters throughout the book, but I thought it seemed a bit lazy to finish the book from Rapskal's very simplistic point of view rather than in greater depth from one of the more complex characters.


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