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Miso

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Gatherings: recipes for feasts great and small
Gatherings: recipes for feasts great and small
Price: £5.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unpretentious and infectious, 13 Feb. 2017
I really like this book - in the same way that Nigel Slater and Diana Henry fill you with enthusiasm to want to cook new things since they themselves just eally enjoy food, this book hits the same vein. It's unpretentious and Flora too has a real understanding of and love for food and, in particular, how to make food which works for a specific occasion with people around her that she loves, which is understated but infectious. There's no lecturing or encouraging people to change their lifestyle, just helpful advice and tasty recipes to share. I've made the beef with the parsley sauce which will definitely become a staple and the sumac chicken which was moist and delicious. I'm not a great baker but the fast flatbreads worked well too and I loved the apple and oats scones (alongside a watercress and almond soup they made for a pretty special light lunch). It's one of those cookbooks which seduces you into baking lots from it - as one thing works you feel tempted to try the next.


The Forever Girl
The Forever Girl
Price: £2.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars nowhere near the quality of some of his other writing, 18 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: The Forever Girl (Kindle Edition)
I have loved the No.1 Ladies Detective series and Scotland Street stories and so will always pick up a book by AMcCS when I see one but gosh I wish I hadn't here. He really struggles to present stories about people in lives we might try to relate to without coming unstuck. The Trains and Lovers book wasn't great but this is dire. The characterisation is just not realistic - the "love" which developed as a child and seemed to exist for years with no sustenance culminating a trip to Australia noone except a stalker would have contemplated? What was he thinking of - does he know people like this? I have rarely disbelieved and been so bored by a book and and at times just wanted to slap the characters. Clearly extra disappointing when it's by an author I even pre-order books from. Why did he write this?


Queen Victoria's Maharajah: Duleep Singh 1838-93
Queen Victoria's Maharajah: Duleep Singh 1838-93
by Michael Alexander
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinary tale of a past time., 18 Feb. 2015
Gosh he was a charachter! Deposed from the Punjab (officially renouncing his rights but too young to understand what he was doing), moved about Indai, then to Britain where he became landed gentry and a pet of the aristocracy until he ran out of mony, struggled against the India Office and then annonced he would reclaim the Punjab. He led an amazing life which is colourfully depicted here. Whilst it's hard to gain any real insights into his character or thoughts, I suspect that he kept these pretty quiet and, sadly, since his children all died childless, what was his "empire" just disappeared like the era he came from. Extraordinary tale of a past time.


A Calendar of Love
A Calendar of Love
by George Mackay Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring and very beautifully written stories, 18 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: A Calendar of Love (Paperback)
A truly wonderful collection of short stories which are so huge in scope of the human condition and time and yet all physically set in the Orkneys. There is a rawness and yet a real acceptance of the harshness at times of life throughout, finding humour in some of the most melancholic occurences. You feel the eternal cycle of life rolling through the pages of all the many characters. I think it's something I will dip into again and again.


George Mackay Brown: The Life
George Mackay Brown: The Life
Price: £6.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Not enough to add to his own autobiography?, 9 Feb. 2015
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I have to say that, having read a lot of GMB's books recently, this felt a bit thin. In particular, there was so much here was in fact directly quoted from his own autobiography that I felt slightly shortchanged. He wrote with such a lyrical magic and that felt dampened down here, without adding too much to how he viewed his friends and his life and his implulses in his own words - some speculation on his sexuality but really not adding much I wouldn't have drawn from reading his book. Perhaps it's more disappointing to come to directly from what he has written but, whilst this is perfectly readable and well-written, it didn't add enough for me and left me feeling I'd know him more had I invested the time in rereading his own works.


Stealing the Mystic Lamb: 304
Stealing the Mystic Lamb: 304
by Noah Charney
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 4 Oct. 2012
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I have loved this painting since I first did any art history studying. This book is marvellous, interspersing detailed descriptions of the painting with the story of its varios homes and thefts down the centuries. It brings even more life to a painting which is already fascinating and magical.


The Fishing Fleet: Husband-Hunting in the Raj
The Fishing Fleet: Husband-Hunting in the Raj
by Anne de Courcy
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Diappointing and disjointed, 4 Oct. 2012
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The author had clearly done a significant amount of research into this book but seemed overkeen to add as many sources as possible so that the narrative was tripping over itself to demonstrate that rather than tell a flowing story - one anecdote which demonstrated that for me and made me at that point stop reading, was, in the middle of a description of the uniforms worn by the Indian staff, re the comments made by one reviewer of a report, regarding the handwriting of an earlier reviewer, absolutely none of which was relevant to the story of these women. It also took the widest possible definition of who comprised the "fishing fleet" to include anyone who went on vacation to India or even was returning there after a period at school in Britain as being part of the husaband-searching set. A focus perhaps on the women who were actually shipped out and paid for by the East India Company would have been a narrower and I think a far more coherent story than that of any young woman who happened to be in India at the time of the Raj. Instead, this was miscellaneous anecdotes of the period, loosely joined up with periodic references to young women to try to create a theme. This was excellent research very badly let down by poor editing.


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