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AW Baader

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Radio 4 Documentary - "The Curse of the Black Meadow" (1978)
Radio 4 Documentary - "The Curse of the Black Meadow" (1978)

5.0 out of 5 stars Darkly wonderful, 13 Mar. 2016
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Absolutely brilliant. A fantastically produced documentary linked to Tales from the Black Meadow by Christopher Lambert. I'm going to have to buy the book now.


Sing Me Your Scars: Volume 3 (Apex Voices)
Sing Me Your Scars: Volume 3 (Apex Voices)
by Damien Angelica Walters
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, simply stunning, 11 Mar. 2016
This has to be one of the most beautifully written collections of short stories that I have read in many years. Walters prose is lush, her stories horrifying and heart wrenching. This book should be on everyone's bookshelves.


Ana Kai Tangata: Tales of the Outer the Other the Damned and the Doomed
Ana Kai Tangata: Tales of the Outer the Other the Damned and the Doomed
by Scott Nicolay
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £22.85

5.0 out of 5 stars The Weird Renaissance Man, 1 Oct. 2015
Ana Kai Tangata: Tales of the outer, the Other, the Damned, and the Doomed is the début collection of short stories and novellas from American author Scott Nicolay. The title means ‘The Cave that Devoured Man’ in Pascuan, the language of Rapa Nui. Whilst there are only eight stories in this collection (alligators, The Bad Outer Space, Ana Kai Tangata, Eyes Exchange Bank, Phragmites, The Soft Frogs, Geschäfte, and Tuckahoe) this by no means implies that this volume is slim pickings -not by any means at all. Scott Nicolay’s stories are a slow burn that take exactly as long as they need to steer you gently off the map and into territories that are familiar yet strange -strange and terrifying. In this Nicolay reminds me another modern great in the world of weird fiction: John Langan; whose tales are also slow burning explorations of the weird.

I had read a couple of these stories before reading this collection: ‘alligators’, the opening tale of the collection, was published on the Lovecraft Ezine, and ‘Eyes Exchange Bank’ featured in Joe Pulver’s Shirley Jackson Award winning tribute to Thomas Ligotti The Grimscribe’s Puppets; and so I was really looking forward to getting stuck into this collection. My excitement at the thought of this collection was exacerbated by the way that Nicolay seems to have a similar approach to the concept of the weird as I do myself. I found his Dogme 2011 for Weird Fiction to be both a humorous and creative approach to ensuring that weird tales don’t stray into the realms of traditional horror and ensuring that they can break free of the shackles of the earlier manifestations of the weird.

Nicolay's work in this volume is of such fantastic quality that it places him on the crest of the wave of weird fiction which is presently crashing headlong into the otherwise placid world of genre fiction.


The Witch-Cult in Western Massachusetts: Volume 1
The Witch-Cult in Western Massachusetts: Volume 1
by Matthew M. Bartlett
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.58

5.0 out of 5 stars A great, and blackly humorous, 1 Oct. 2015
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A great, and blackly humorous, companion piece to Bartlett's 'Gateways to Abomination'. Get both, they're well worth your pennies and your time.


Gateways to Abomination
Gateways to Abomination
by Matthew M. Bartlett
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.68

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I absolutely loved this book, 1 Oct. 2015
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I absolutely loved this book. Gateways is probably one of the most interesting works to have been released over the last year or so as part of this weird renaissance that we are currently experiencing. Comprised of a number of vignettes and short stories loosely tied together by the bizarre occult radio station WXXT it reads more like a novel composed of disjointed fragments than a collection of short fiction. I really can’t recommend this highly enough.


Red Tree, The
Red Tree, The
by Caitlin R. Kiernan
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The cover is NOT the book., 28 May 2015
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First off. DO NOT LET THE COVER FOOL YOU!
This is not urban fantasy/paranormal romance. This is a beautifully written piece of literary weird/cosmic horror. Whoever ok’d this cover doesn’t seem to have read the book.
Taking the form of a journal kept by Sarah Crow, an author grieving the suicide of her partner, The Red Tree is a sumptuously written examination of grief, anger, loneliness and the effects these can have on a person’s sanity. Kiernan is masterful at her deployment of the unreliable narrator. The concept of the unreliable narrator being one that runs throughout this story; and, indeed, is carried on in her next novel The Drowning Girl.
The plot of the novel revolves around an ancient tree sitting just within sight of a farm house Sarah has rented in order to both work on her novel and try and deal with her grief. The tree is steeped in monstrous lore and terrible legends linked to barbarous rituals, serial killers and suicides. These myths and legends weave themselves into Sarah’s story, into her grief, her loss and begin to fragment her sense of self and reality.
As with all of Kiernan’s work The Red Tree is gorgeously written and a joy to read. Her prose is exceptional in the field of weird/horror writing and why she hasn’t won more awards I do not know.
Still, I don’t know what the hell is going on with that cover…


The King in Yellow Tales: Volume 1
The King in Yellow Tales: Volume 1
by Joseph S. Pulver Sr.
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.43

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars tl;dr: This is amazing, buy this book., 28 May 2015
Joseph S. Pulver is the King in Yellow –sorry True Detective fans; the Yellow King does not reside in Louisiana where he drives a power mower. No; this particular bEast resides in Berlin where he writes a form of Weird Fiction that seamlessly blends Noir, Beat, and Decadence with a cosmic kind of horror which can in turns wash over you with deliciously off kilter poetics before filling you with a dread that works its way into the darker, most hidden, reaches of your psyche.

The King in Yellow is a collection of short stories in the French Decadent tradition written by an American, Robert W. Chambers, in the 1890s. Pulver has been producing work which riffs off of the King in Yellow the_king_in_yellow_t_cover_for_kindlestories for decades and he is the person most responsible for keeping the yellow flame alive as a field of literary exploration in its own right for all that time. During the 20th Century Chambers’ work was brought into the mythology created by H.P. Lovecraft and the strange denizens that wreak havoc in Chambers’ work were turned into ancient and terrible alien gods by the acolytes of Lovecraft, even though he only made passing reference to them in his own work. Pulver has all but severed these ties to Lovecraft and instead seeks to explore the maddening influence of the more mysterious aspects of Chambers’ work: the titular play which drives mad any who witness or read the second act, and the Yellow Sign which casts a baleful influence over all who are unfortunate enough to encounter it.

That’s not to say that Pulver has abandoned all Lovecraftian elements; the first story proper in this collection, ‘Choosing’, is a post apocalyptic nightmare merging both mythologies into a bewildering scream of frustration and pain. Frustration at one’s powerlessness to resist horrors heaped down upon us by those protected by power and tradition; pain at the suffering inflicted upon those about whom we care by those stronger than us. To me this story seemed to speak of the way in which women, as a body of people, are abused and maltreated by society and the powerlessness of individuals to confront and challenge this maltreatment. Of course the story is also a brilliant horror tale and it’s testament to Pulver’s skill as a writer that his works can be read in different ways and to varying depths.

“To no particular where, just went. Stepped right into August like it was a voyage or a baptism. Stopped in his cheap room, grabbed his stuff and left. Somewhere down the road he’d find her. The wind would take him to her”

-‘Carl Lee & Cassilda’

Pulver’s hard-boiled, noir infected, prose in the ‘Carl Lee & Cassilda’ triptych of stories takes Chambers’ creations and places them firmly into America’s bourbon soaked underbelly of hustlers, hookers, lunacy and bloody murder. This dark sensibility and affinity for the broken refugees and cast-offs of society permeates much of Pulver’s work and his characters reflect this darkness. You will not like some, or many, of the characters in this book but then: you’re not supposed to. These are the stories, after all, that lurk in rain drenched alleyways waiting to seize an unsuspecting passerby and to turn their world upside down.

Joe Pulver is no a fearful writer and his prose in this collection illustrates this eagerly as he experiments with the form and function of the English language. Happily jumping from beat infused noir to decadent stage plays and poetic verse. His playing with form suggests to me that the printed page is going to give the reader the greatest appreciation for his work –though a regular e-reader may render the prose as it was initially meant to be read, I read this on my smartphone and the reflowing of some of his more poetic tales has guaranteed that I am also going to seek this collection out in paperback.

In ‘Saint Nicholas Hall’, dedicated to America’s Kafka –Michael Cisco, Pulver takes his creative muse and uses is as a scalpel to hone a beautifully realised modernist(?) prose poem that again plays with the form of the written word to fashion a phantasmagoric Carcosan cityscape through which the protagonist travels towards his confrontation with loss.

These are just a handful of the stories that make up this first volume of Jospeh Pulver Sr.’s collected King in Yellow tales. I highlighted these few as I feel they illustrate quite how deep a literary well Pulver is drawing from. This collection is an absolute must for anyone with an interest in the renaissance of weird fiction which has been underway these last few years. Pulver is a master of his art and you deserve to read him.


My Work Is Not Yet Done
My Work Is Not Yet Done
by Thomas Ligotti
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 19 April 2014
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There's not much more to say really, other than: if you are a fan of dark horrific fiction you should read this.


I Am the New God
I Am the New God
Price: £1.54

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A rising dark star, 19 April 2014
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This review is from: I Am the New God (Kindle Edition)
Having read this and Nicole Cushing's other novella, Children of No One, I am excited to see what she will produce next. This story follows the bloody and deranged apotheosis of a new God, the latest manifestation of a cycle which has been in motion for eons and which seems to stretch across the vast gulfs of space as well as time. Cushing has a darkness to her writing which is reminiscent at times of Clive Barker with a heavy dash of Thomas Ligotti for good measure. If you enjoy the work of either of these writers then you will, most certainly, enjoy the work of Nicole Cushing.


View Askew Buddy Christ Bobble Statue
View Askew Buddy Christ Bobble Statue

1.0 out of 5 stars Not as described, 8 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this for a friend who I don't see often. I was recently visiting them and chanced to see it. It isn't a 'booble head' at all and looks nothing like the picture seen here. It is a standard action figure. Was really quite pissed off as it is too late to return now. >:(


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