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Ian C "ianpchandler"

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An Immersion Of Travelling and Photography in Northern India: Make Memories For Life Behind Your Camera
An Immersion Of Travelling and Photography in Northern India: Make Memories For Life Behind Your Camera
by Mr Jamie Robinson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Want to visit India and enjoy the place, 2 Jan. 2016
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Want to visit India and enjoy the place, the people and the photo opportunities? This super book by young traveller and photographer Jamie Robinson works on many levels. Firstly when glancing through it is the faces of the people that stop you, and you realise that Jamie has a real talent for connecting with people quickly and bringing out the best in them. The book is a real pleasure for the pictures alone and could be bougt for that, but it is also both a guide to the basics of using your camera and a helpful travel guide to travelling independently in India for the novice backpacker. So this book is aimed at anyone who wants to do any of these. It's inspiring, helpful and simply accessibly written, and I hope inspires many more pictures and journeys of personal discovery.


Hunters in the Dark
Hunters in the Dark
by Lawrence Osborne
Edition: Hardcover

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's about you, 27 July 2015
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This review is from: Hunters in the Dark (Hardcover)
This book springs from the same stable as Ballad of a Small Player. A loner of an Englishman drifting through South-East Asia, going to the casino, having a shallow affair with an enigmatic young woman, and getting into a tight spot with cash flow and the local bandits. I went to Cambodia on holiday three years ago, and Hunters brought back to me the sights and sounds of the streets and rivers I'd forgotten, and I'm glad I bought it for that alone. But it goes deeper than that. In the clash of West and East; Khmer Rouge and modern Cambodia; Sussex, Paris and Phnom Penh; Asia on the rise and Europe on the Gibbonesque wane, it touched in me all those thoughts and fears about where is my life as a single Asia-loving Englishman going. How rootless can you be and be happy? Where is Europe going to go in my lifetime? Will retirement to a beach-hut in Cambodia be a safer option?


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars An idyllic cultured sexy novel, 29 Jun. 2015
First thing to say, I loved this book. I read The Line of Beauty some years ago, but this first novel has a freshness and joie de vivre I don't recall in that. Stretching my memory at a distance, I prefer this one. In relating Will's attempt to write the life of the elderly Lord Charles Nantwich, the story switches between descriptions of promiscuous gay sex in early 1980's London and cultured discussion of Regency architecture, Wagner and Britten. And hops from Soho to pre-war Sudan. The Swimming Pool Library is not just entertaining but also touches on truths of relationships I could really relate to, and left me touched and moved. I do wonder how wide the readership of this novel is, given what I've said above about its skipping lightly from tight swimming trunks on young men to Coade stone vases and Adam architecture, but I can see why it achieved the critical success it did. And it left me humming the Siegfried Idyll all day long.


You Mean the World to Me
You Mean the World to Me
Price: £12.59

9 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars All chintz; no camp., 30 Sept. 2014
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Make sure you understand what you are getting yourself into here. Billed as a celebration of 20's Berlin, this isn't at all Ute Lemper and Cabaret territory. This is straight up belt it out old-fashioned tenor crooning of the kind your granny would love as she clutches her lavender scented talc bottle and reaches for another slice of battenberg. No fun or camp, just early 20th century tenor schmaltz. Not my thing. Although Kaufmann undoubtedly sings it extremely well.


Wallpaper* City Guide Buenos Aires 2014
Wallpaper* City Guide Buenos Aires 2014
by Matt Chesterton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.95

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A pocket guide to the best of BA, 25 Jun. 2014
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I feel have to defend Wallpaper city guides from the unfair review already posted. I own a few, and recently bought this one as am soon spending 4 days in BA on a tour of South America. The blurb on the inside cover describes it as a "precise informative checklist of the most enticing architecture and design".
And this is what you get. Wallpaper city guides are not Lonely Planets or Rough Guides. They don't tell you where the best cheap hotels, laundrettes and postcard stores are. I'm not 100% sure who the target readership for them is, and I take them slightly tongue in cheek to be honest. They are aimed at people with a specific interest in modern architecture, interior decor, design and fashionable restaurants. The great beauty of them is the photographs. The map is a token gesture - no use but that's what alternative guide books or smart phones are for.
If you are someone for whom one of the main joys of visiting foreign cities is checking out the best of the modern architecture and glitziest bars by the latest designer of the moment, then you'll be rewarded with this book. If you want to know the bus times to the 2pm guided tour of the Gothic monastery, look elsewhere.


Pompey: A Novel
Pompey: A Novel
by Jonathan Meades
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A dense evocation of the underbelly, 23 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Pompey: A Novel (Paperback)
If you are a fan of Jonathan Meades' gripping cerebral eviscerating documentaries of twentieth century architecture, then you'll love Pompey. And if you love the richness of English vocabulary and its myriad ways to describe every kind of sex act then you'll love it too. It makes post war Brussels interesting, the Belgian Congo more interesting still, and shines a whole new light on the housewives, pubs, tower blocks and back street abortionists of Portsmouth. This is a novel like very few you've ever read - dense with alliteration, description and the deep deep well of English vocabulary. But this is both the book's strength and weakness. It's richness and density is like a diet of Christmas cake for breakfast, dinner and tea. This book is great; its authors mind is great; but it can leave your brain feeling slightly pummelled like a boxer with a poor defence on the end of too many left hooks.


Shadow Country
Shadow Country
by Peter Matthiessen
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning novel, 8 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Shadow Country (Paperback)
Having just finished Shadow Country today I cannot help thinking this is one of the greatest novels I have ever read. It opens up in all its dirty violent inglory a part of the world I have rarely thought about and never visited - South Carolina and the Everglades from after the Civil War to 1910. But that is only two thirds of this trilogy. In E.J. Watson's son Lucius' account of his investigation into his father's death, Matthiessen carries on through the trenches of the Western Front into the Thirties.
I love Matthiessen's travel writing, which is how I know him, and I was worried straying into his fiction in case I was disappointed. But oh no. This epic tale is incredible. What impresses about this book is the breadth and depth of imagination to realise the details of the plot in telling in 890 pages the interconnecting stories and views of many interwoven characters in one seminal event in the opening up of distant marshy south Florida, the shooting of frontiersman farmer Watson. I loved immersing myself in the vernacular language and imagining the sights and smells of this rough band of men and women long forgotten by history. The moonshine-sozzled life lived hard and short of the cane crop, the black labour, the hogs, the young wife and the revolver. Despite the shooting being described in the first nine pages, the pace never flags and the suspense still builds to the book's very last page.


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