Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for Moonless > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Moonless
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,517
Helpful Votes: 494

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Moonless (London Town)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-19
pixel
Revenge of the Middle-Aged Woman
Revenge of the Middle-Aged Woman
by Elizabeth Buchan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good holiday read, 28 April 2014
It’s the time of year again to start thinking about summer holiday reading, and Elizabeth Buchan’s 2002 novel is a pretty good place to start. The story is not as dramatic as the title makes out. There are no spiteful, vengeful acts of suits slashing and crockery smashing, drunken displays of embarrassment or screaming matches in public. Instead, there is a measured, more profound approach to the fallout caused by infidelity and the breakup of families.

The main characters, Rose and Nathan, have been married for 25 years. Rose thinks they are happy enough but then Nathan drops a bombshell that not only is he about to leave Rose, he’s also leaving her for her assistant, Minty. Thus begins an unravelling of the couple’s relationship, not just with each other, but also with their children, friends and work colleagues. There are flashbacks to happier times, and times before Rose met Nathan, as she wonders how it all went wrong, and whether ghosts from her past had always been present.

What’s interesting, though, is how Rose seems to cope better with the breakup than Nathan does. As she becomes stronger, or more together, he appears to be falling apart. Sometimes you want Rose to do the whole screaming, wronged-woman thing, but ultimately, her dignity and empathy wins out in the end.


Marathon Leicester Stripe 5 Pair Pack Sock Men's Socks multicolored One Size
Marathon Leicester Stripe 5 Pair Pack Sock Men's Socks multicolored One Size

5.0 out of 5 stars Good quality, 26 Mar. 2014
This brand of socks is slightly more expensive than others, however, the quality and comfort reflect this. I got this set for my husband and he has found them very comfortable. They allow the feet to breathe, and have lasted well for over a year. Also kept their colour and brightness. Would recommend similar from the same brand (as I've seen this particular set is not currently available).


Pebble Octopus Soft Toy Rattle Hand Made and Fair Trade. Green
Pebble Octopus Soft Toy Rattle Hand Made and Fair Trade. Green
Offered by Bumbles Cards & Gifts
Price: £11.78

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pebbles can cause a ripple effect!, 9 Mar. 2014
Pebble products are a firm favourite gift of mine for all the new babies in my life. They are made by a women's cooperative in Bangladesh, called Hathay Bunano. Hathay Bunano means made by hand, and the toys are made by women who are part of a non-profit fair trade organisation.
The toys themselves are so well made. They are bright, colourful, eye-catching and comforting for tiny eyes and hands. I particularly like this octopus which I've sent as far afield as Australia and the US as gifts. Its legs are easy for small fingers to clutch and it also makes a gentle rattle sound.

If you're not into octopuses, Pebble have also just launched a new range of `Once Upon a Time' toys such as Humpty Dumpty, unicorns and dragons. I would recommend them as a slightly alternative gift, and certainly one that gives back!


Millions
Millions
by Frank Cottrell Boyce
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Money can buy you whatever you want - can't it?, 9 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Millions (Paperback)
Damian and Anthony Cunningham live with their father. Their mother has ‘gone to a better place’, and the boys are often told to ‘be good’ for their father’s sake. Damian, however, takes this literally, believing being good is to be saintly. He takes a healthy, yet slightly extreme interest in saints, to the point of trying to emulate their acts of mortification. He sleeps on the floor, he stuffs holly down his shirt for self-flagellation. The adults are concerned, but Damian finds comfort in his faith. So much so, that one day, as he ponders life in his self-built hermitage, a bag of money drops out of the sky. Damian believes it’s a gift from God.

Together with Anthony, the boys discover there is more than £200,000 in the bag. But not only that, they have only 17 days to spend the money before sterling is replaced by the Euro. The more pragmatic Anthony has several ideas but Damian is more considered about how they should spend the money, including giving it away. They soon realise, though, that trying to secretly spend thousands and thousands of pounds in a short space of time is not that easy! And finding out where the money came from only adds to their woes.

This story works well on so many levels. It’s a story about love, loss, morality and mortality. Can money make everything alright or can it make things worse? Should those who have more, share more? Or is it everyone for themselves? Above all, can it make you happy? A well-written, thought-provoking and witty story, ‘Millions’ will keep children of 9 years and upwards engaged and truly thinking about the real values of life and money.


Martin Harbottle's Appreciation of Time
Martin Harbottle's Appreciation of Time
by Dominic Utton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Leaves on the line?, 8 Mar. 2014
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Marti Harbottle is the Managing Director of Premier Westward trains, and he has one very unhappy customer to contend with. Dan travels from Oxford to London five days a week to work at a tabloid newspaper. His journeys are usually frustrating due to the delays that make him late for work (to an irate and irrational boss) and late home (to an irate, exhausted wife and a sleepless new-born). Thus Dan decides that for every delay, he'll write an email of complaint to Mr Harbottle that equals the length of the delay. As the days and months progress, so Dan's emails become more personal and angst-ridden about his home life, work life, and everything else in between, and a close yet distant relationship between the two men is established.

Overall, this novel is very enjoyable but it almost hit the rails for me at the beginning. As I started it, I felt like I was on a slow train to nowhere, and unlikely to reach my destination (the end). The banterish style of writing was rather a bit too blokey for me, and the email style a bit clunky. However, Dan is a tabloid journalist, and I guess that was the writing style. While it chugs along at first, the story soon picks up speed. Dan's emails become more and more animated: he discusses his personal life, his fellow passengers (or customers as the train companies would have us known), his work and colleagues, and the looming hacking court case his paper is facing. Yes, lots of parallels with the real world here. Indeed, the novel is based on a real blog which you should be able to find at Dominic Utton's website. Some of the excuses given for the train delays though are hilarious. I'm not sure if they could ever be real (for example, a scarecrow blows onto the track suggesting an intruder is on the line), but you never know!

A good read overall, particularly for that daily commute!


Om Shanti, Babe
Om Shanti, Babe
by Helen Limon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Life is not all it seems, 21 Feb. 2014
This review is from: Om Shanti, Babe (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Cass is a bored 15-year old who is having problems at school. As a result, her mum takes her out of school for a while and on a buying trip to India. Cass imagines Bollywood beauty, cool people and a laid-back scene. Instead, heat, noise, pollution and being accosted by strangers are just the start of her troubles.

This is a novel partly about self-discovery. At the start, Cass is petulant, bored and pretty selfish. She's not interested in too much, and hates the fact that her mum has a budding relationship in Kerala with Mr `Call-Me-V'. As the days pass, though, Cass starts making new friends and new discoveries. She finds out her mum's shop is in serious trouble. She finds out that the beautiful local beach and mangrove trees are threatened by a hotel development, which will displace local people and destroy the environment. Suddenly, Cass awakens. Not only does she learn about what the development will do to the local community and her new-found friends, but also a tremendous shock when she discovers who is promoting the hotel.

The novel starts off slowly, and it's hard to like Cass. As it progresses, though, it starts to pick up pace and excitement. Can Cass and the locals stop the development? What will happen to her mum's shop? And is Mr `Call-Me-V' going to become her step-dad?! Cass begins to mature and realises that there is a world out there that is bigger than her.

Witty and well-written, it's worth persevering with. Cass's problems are not fully resolved by the end of the novel, so could there be a sequel?


After Tomorrow
After Tomorrow
by Gillian Cross
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.80

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Topical and timely, 3 Feb. 2014
This review is from: After Tomorrow (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Gillian Cross’s latest book will send shivers up your spine – that is, if you care about the displaced and those forced to flee their homes. In recent days, the subject of Syrian refugees has come up again and again. Should they be allowed into Britain or not? It’s hard to truly empathise with the plight of refugees and asylum seekers for many people, especially those of us who live in stable, law-abiding countries. But imagine. What if those refugees were people like you and me? Were British...?

That’s the case in ‘After Tomorrow’. The UK is in chaos. Five banks have collapsed on the same day, leaving the country in anarchy. Infrastructure is failing, law and order are breaking down, food is scarce. Could it happen? Who knows? But in this novel, Cross explores just what those issues mean, and their consequences.

Matt and his family are living the nightmare. His mum and step-dad do what they can to keep him and his brother, Taco, fed and safe. Sometimes, though, a meal can be just a few vegetables or a piece of bread. Bit by bit they manage to build up a food store through growing their own vegetables and swapping items with others. However, they are raided again and again, their food stolen by those who label them ‘scadgers: people who hoard food at the expense of others. Tragedy strikes and Matt’s mum decides they must escape to France before the borders are shut.

Thus begins the story in earnest. Matt’s family (bar his mum and gran) arrive in France, to the unknown. To the French, they are scavengers, living at their expense through free food vouchers and homes. That the vouchers can barely feed a family or that the homes are fragile tents in muddy fields exposed to the elements is irrelevant. As is human nature, though, Matt begins to make friends, relationships are forged, routines established.

Throughout, the refugees play a waiting game: waiting for food, waiting for medicine, waiting for news, waiting to go home. Will they ever make it? We don’t know. There is no ending. We have a conclusion of sorts but no real ending. And that is the reality of many refugees today. Palestinians wait to return ‘home’ nearly 70 years after they were first displaced. Some 100,000 refugees have lived in Western Sahara since the 1970s. New refugees are created as we speak.

Thus in context, ‘After Tomorrow’ is a fabulous book to get the dialogue started in the classroom. It would be a great text for higher readers in Years 5 and 6, and definitely one for lower years in secondary school. The plight of refugees will sadly never go away, and this novel provokes thought, discussion and reflection.


You Had Me At Hello
You Had Me At Hello
by Mhairi McFarlane
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars About a hundred pages too long!, 21 Jan. 2014
This review is from: You Had Me At Hello (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
There is no doubt that Mhairi McFarlane is a talented writer. She comes out with some great quips and the parts about the main character's (Rachel) job as a criminal court reporter are intriguing and keep you turning the page. However, most of the story is about Rachel and her obsession with Ben, who she used to know at university. The title makes it obvious that he `was the one that got away'. They reconnect after ten years, and thus the story is all about will they, won't they. It's interspersed with past (uni days) and present (ten years on), also written in the past and present tenses, which I found a tad irritating.

As I said, I think the novel could have been a lot shorter. There are way too many metaphors and similes, as if the author tried to throw everything at the story that she had learnt in creative writing class. It's a good read for the beach, but not one that you'll be thinking about long after you've turned the final page.


Alpen Apricot and Almond 560 g (Pack of 6)
Alpen Apricot and Almond 560 g (Pack of 6)

4.0 out of 5 stars A tasty combination, 20 Jan. 2014
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I'm not usually a fan of muesli, preferring porridge as my being good breakfast of choice! However, I was attracted to this, perhaps because of the warming, colourful packaging. This particular Alpen product is marketed as an apricot, almond and hazelnut variety. I found it to be just right in the level of sweetness, not too sweet nor having that `cardboard' taste. Although they are not mentioned on the front of the box, sultanas make up a bigger proportion of the recipe than the apricots, almonds or hazelnuts. I'm not a fan of these in cereals as I find them to be too chewy and they really demand some serious cheek chomping! However, it wasn't so bad as to mark this product down.

The nuts and apricots add a nice twist and make a good combination. I also felt full for quite a few hours on a bowl of about 40 - 50 grammes. Overall, I enjoyed this product very much and wouldn't hesitate to buy again.


Atlantis - Series 1 [Blu-ray]
Atlantis - Series 1 [Blu-ray]
Dvd ~ Jack Donnelly
Offered by b68solutions
Price: £8.49

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A marvellous twists on the ancient myths, 6 Jan. 2014
First of all, let me say that I have not see `Merlin'. Therefore, there won't be any comparisons and this review will be about `Atlantis', alone!

I have to say that from the first moment, this series gripped me. I love fantasy-type series, and Greek mythology itself is full of fascinating and mesmering tales. The writers have taken the ancient Greek myths and well-known characters and Gods, and given them their own twists.

In the first episode, Jason is washed up on the shores of a strange city called Atlantis. He unnaturally settles in quickly, but does admit that Atlantis seems more like home to him than where he came from. Thus throughout the series we are given little hints that something about Jason is amiss. He is not who he seems to be, and a deep mystery surrounds him. We are given the great reveal right at the end. I must admit, it was a shock to me!

Jason befriends Hercules and Pythagoras in the first episode, and from there on in, the trio find themselves facing many dangers and adventures. Each episode is a stand-alone (apart from the last two), as well as having threads linking each to a story of a power struggle at the royal palace. While the three find themselves at death's door on numerous occasions, you just know that they are going to escape. This doesn't detract from the enjoyment, though, although sometimes it does feel a little forced. However, death, destruction, corruption and fear do have their roles to play, as do the Gods! The writing is humorous at times, and there is a quirky twist to the Greek myths. The old favourites are there: Medusa, the Oracle, Daedalus, the Furies and many more. Easy viewing and great family entertainment. Can't wait for the second series. In the meantime, I'm off to find Merlin!


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-19