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Profile for Ms GlaGla > Reviews

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Reviews Written by
Ms GlaGla (London)

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The Last Anniversary
The Last Anniversary
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Cosy read, 16 Jan. 2015
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All of Moriarty's books are like a good hot cup of tea on a cold day! This one is as good as any of her others, with enough mystery, genuinely likeable characters and a particularly lovely setting to make it un-put-down-able


I followed my man to Lausanne: moving to Switzerland
I followed my man to Lausanne: moving to Switzerland
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars informative, 10 Nov. 2014
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The title caught my eye as I will be following a man to Lausanne in the next few months. I wouldn't describe this as a story, but very, very, very helpful and informative if you're planning a move.


May We Be Forgiven
May We Be Forgiven
Price: £6.02

5.0 out of 5 stars Un-putdownable, 3 May 2014
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I never thought this would be a feel good book, not in mind of where it starts and up until about halfway. Full of the spoils and complexities of being human, of guilt and the need to move along. Unputdownable as well as inspiring the need to find out what 'ersatz' means.


365 Social Media Tips: A year of ideas for marketing your business via LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and more!
365 Social Media Tips: A year of ideas for marketing your business via LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and more!
Price: £1.99

4.0 out of 5 stars very helpful!, 6 Mar. 2014
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I was apprehensive as it starts with a detailed look at Linkdin but learnt so much new information about things I'd never heard of beyond that - very helpful and the author makes it very clear how to use - no fluff in this, it's very practical!


Bellman & Black
Bellman & Black
Price: £1.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 25 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Bellman & Black (Kindle Edition)
The blurb sums the story up well. Personally, I found the many pages in between the boyhood incident, the deal and the birth of Bellman & Black to be lacking in suspense, intrigue or even characters that you can care about in the least. One of the reviews I read of this book was 'a lot of people die' and this is probably the main thing I can remember of this book - a death count you lose track of because the characters really don't get time to be cared about to be lost. It doesn't feel like a ghost story, though could be read as an interesting historical insight into the textiles industry. Hence my rating.


Dark Places
Dark Places
Price: £0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A great dark read, 29 Dec. 2013
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This review is from: Dark Places (Kindle Edition)
Libby Day is one of two survivors from the night her family was murdered- the other is her brother who is currently in prison for the spree. What starts as a way to get money fast down spirals into a re-examination if that night.


Gillespie and I
Gillespie and I
by Jane Harris
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down!, 5 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Gillespie and I (Paperback)
A novel based mainly in Victoriian times narrated by Harriet Baxter, a 'soulmate' of Ned Gillespie and reliable friend to his family.

I reached page 153 of this - a book that exceeds six hundred pages and felt smugly frustrated that I had worked out exactly what was going on. I was already thinking ahead of all the ways in which the book would further seek to irritate me and ploughed on, regardless as it was quite an easy narrative to continue. Other irritations surfaced - Harriet's all too convenient timing around the Giillespie family, the way in which I realised that were such a character to appear in my life I'd balk at their interfering busy-bodyness. I could not quite comprehend how or why the author had written the character in this way, believing for a little while that in fact the author had little awareness of just how irritating her narrator was. The part I found most difficult to comprehend was the 'amazing friendship' between the narrator and the author Ned Gillespie, wondering at how such a friendship would have worked or occurred in the historical setting as well as just not feeling convinced of it in the novel. Just as I was beginning to doubt the point of hoping for improvement, the sinister event that had been alluded to from the beginning of the novel occurred.

And shortly after that, the narrative took a turn in, for me, a wholly unexpected and extremely clever way. All my irritations with Harriet dissipated and i was unable to put it down until i had finished it. The novel switches between the events around the Gillespie family from 1888 and to where Hariet is writing a memoir and struggling with her assistant in 1933, an early section from the latter that had led me to believe the story would be predictable. As it is, the 1933 sections go on to emphasise a truth from the tangled memoir of the narrator.

Amazing book, one that I will probably read again in the future.


The Last Werewolf (The Last Werewolf 1) (The Last Werewolf Trilogy)
The Last Werewolf (The Last Werewolf 1) (The Last Werewolf Trilogy)
by Glen Duncan
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Dark and funny, 31 Oct. 2011
Jack is the last werewolf, as admitted to him by a trusted friend within the first sentence of the book. In another novelist's hands, this might have cued an immediate fight for survival with the protagonist's inner thoughts solely on this instinct. Not so with Jack, for whom the news sits as an invitation after so many years of existing. As the story, which is written as a journal continues, it is much as the blurb says, a horrific murder and chance encounter that propel the story onwards.

I have not read many books about werewolves, and am generally frightened off from the genre by the overt romanticisation that many stories give way to. But Jack's narrative is blisteringly passionate, with little detail spared on hunting, eating and all things carnal.

What I particularly loved and admired about this was the gothic feel that was spread across the novel, a skill that feels lost in the general modern novels that take 'traditional' gothic concepts and write them in the present day. I found the plot to be fast paced, with sub-plots set at non-distracting places, all of which tie into the general plot. And I really loved the ending which I had not seen coming. There were a few chapters placed just after the middle of the book that I felt slowed the pace down and I did want it to hurry up, but I suppose it needed to go in. The language is - um, strong but as I was grateful this wasn't a touchy-feely searching for meaning tale the language I suppose was in its right place.

Really enjoyable, and will probably search for more Glen Duncan in the future.


Rivers of London: The First PC Grant Mystery: 1
Rivers of London: The First PC Grant Mystery: 1
by Ben Aaronovitch
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.84

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable, 26 Oct. 2011
After recently reading a number of books that deal with an idea of the supernatural, Rivers of London was a pleasant break from the generic overtures that other novelists cling to. This is definitely different to anything else I have read before, with the Metropolitan Police attitudes and procedures mirrored so closely that I wondered whether the author had spent most of his life working for them whilst at the same time, and in a fairly balanced way, Aaranovitch blends a whole other world of things that aren't true to life within and around the work of the institution.

Very good!


A Discovery of Witches
A Discovery of Witches
by Deborah Harkness
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars So very bad, 25 Oct. 2011
This review is from: A Discovery of Witches (Paperback)
I brought this chunky book through the airport for a week away, stupidly happy that I had found a book that promised me witches dealt with in an academic setting, believing I would be treated to something of a similar fashion to Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. How wrong I was. There was something about the first few pages that told me this was not going to be that good: it may have been tainted by my too late reading of the blurb that had something about a witch and a vampire falling in love that I had not seen in enough time to throw back onto the shelf and run away from quickly.

I decided lot persevere, being that I could not find a bookshop to buy something else. Like many other reviiewers who have deigned this book stars at the lower end of the spectrum I found it very difficult to view the main character as anything more than a wisp, with her constant angst about how not to use witchcraft blah blah blah. It was a very bad moment for me when a typically broody vampire decided to enter the plot, falling quickly - and bloodily of course in love with her.

Still I persevered. I can't remember the exact sentence but believe I wanted to throw the book into the pool/sea/toilet when Mr. Vampire opened a door for The main character and she balked, stating that because women were independent they didn't need doors opening for them. It was all just a bit obvious.

I found it so but churning,y bad that about .a quarter of the way in I had to start skim reading. What I found more devastating than anything else was that the will be more books about these cardboard characters - I will be avoiding them!


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