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Andrew Panero

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At the Mountains of Madness (Illustrated Classics (Sterling))
At the Mountains of Madness (Illustrated Classics (Sterling))
by H. P. Lovecraft
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Adaptation of HP Lovecraft's seminal work, 16 Mar. 2014
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I love HP Lovecraft and this is a must have book for aficionados of the macabre. Really brings the story to life in a fantastic way.


Doctor Who: The Dalek Project
Doctor Who: The Dalek Project
by Justin Richards
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last we see this story in print., 6 Feb. 2013
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Originally scheduled as a David Tennant story instead this graphic novel was shelved a few years back, probably because of the similarities to 2010's 'Victory of the Daleks' by Steve Gatiss. However, any such resemblance to that story is superficial. There are stronger connections to the 1967 Patrick Troughton story 'The Evil of the Daleks' by David Whittaker.
Nice to see the 2005 'NSD' Daleks back in action again and there are some superb steam punk variants on Dalek design in this story. The plot unfurls at a cracking pace and there are lots of booms, bangs and surprises on the way. Some reviewers have suggested that Matt Smith's Doctor comes across with a lot of David Tennant traits in this story: I can't say I noticed that myself. There is one point where the characters the Doctor meets (he is travelling alone in this adventure) who fill the normal companion role, seem to turn into question and answer machines. However I only noticed this on the second reading so shouldn't dampen the enjoyment too much.


Strontium Dog: the Life and Death of Johnny Alpha
Strontium Dog: the Life and Death of Johnny Alpha
by John Wagner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping story brilliant illustration, 6 Feb. 2013
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Long time fan of Strontium Dog and the writing of John Wagner. This story works really well in this format. I can imagine that on a weekly basis it may be somewhat slow, but as a graphic novel it it flows really well. Highly recommended for fans and newcomers alike.


Doctor Who: The Seeds of Death [DVD] [1963]
Doctor Who: The Seeds of Death [DVD] [1963]
Dvd ~ Patrick Troughton
Offered by Helgy
Price: £13.99

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best Patrick Troughton Who, 4 Oct. 2004
Well, I haven't seen the original ice warriors story so I don't have any ready comparision. This was in the twilight season of sixties Dr Who and watching this one can understand why their ratings were starting to plummet. Interesting from a cultural and historical perspective, but the plot is pants and has more holes than a leaky collander.
However the DVD has some interesting special features, the best of which for me was the 'The Last Dalek.' This was a ten-minute 8mm film made by BBC designer Tony Cornell of the climatic Dalek Battle sequence in 'The Evil of the Daleks'. Given that this sequence in the actual programme was lost forver when the BBC wiped their archives in the seventies, this little film gives us a window onto one of Patrick Troughton's more worthy stories.


Doctor Who: Daleks (Dr Who)
Doctor Who: Daleks (Dr Who)
by Doctor Who
Edition: Audio CD

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dalek Major., 13 May 2004
I had not heard the Power of the Daleks before but I was familiar with the story from the Photonovel section of the BBCi Dr Who website. The plotting and characterization on 'Power' are very sophisticated for a 1960's Children's TV programme. If David Whittaker's script has any faults it is in that he tries to make it too clever at times, but the overall effect is very good. The story works on a number of different levels: The Daleks need power in the form of static electricity in order to move and exterminate things. The various humans involved think that they can use the Daleks' Power for their own purposes, only to be proved fatally wrong and of course it is the Doctor who eventually turns the Daleks' power source into a weapon to destroy them and save the day.
The audio version brought out some splendid aspects to the story- in particular Lesterson's degenerating mental state as he realises what he has unleashed. It also enables one to hear the pauses in the conniving Daleks' dialogue as they intone 'I am your serv-ant!' Unlike one of the other reviewers here I did not have any problem with the narration as such and felt that it helped link the scenes together fairly effectively.
The new recording of 'Evil of the Daleks' is a very welcome improvement on the early taped release narrated by Tom Baker. Frazer Hines' narration is much more inclusive and descriptive of the action. This applies particularly to one scene where Jamie and Kemel are exploring the South Wing of Maxtibles' house. In the background a Dalek takes an hankerchief and places it a room where a trap has been set. This detail is absent from the earlier release and therefore makes understanding the next part of the action imcomplete.
I have very distinct memories of the Dalek Civil war sequence from my early childhood. It was certainly a very shocking and memorable piece of television history- Daleks rolling around chaotically and exploding a foamy gunge from their lidless heads. The audio release has various extra tracks of this sequence and some funny Dalek voice sessions where you can hear Daleks dying and spinning out of control.
Definitely a must by for dedicated fans.


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