Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit
Profile for Edward Malcolm > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Edward Malcolm
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,049,025
Helpful Votes: 25

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Edward Malcolm (Reading, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Book of Homilies
Book of Homilies
by Church of England
Edition: Paperback
Price: £30.00

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars shed a good deal of light on the BCP and the Articles, 28 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Book of Homilies (Paperback)
Those who know anything about the Church of England know that her doctrine is set out in the Book of Common Prayer, the Ordinal (the services for ordaining clergy and consecrating bishops), the Thirty-nine Articles, and the Books of Homilies. This last is the most important, since it is the most detailed.
At the time of the Reformation preaching was banned in England, for the simple reason that the vast majority of the clergy were uneducated theologically, and could not preach. Instead, a book of Homilies was published, from which sermons were to be read to the congregations. In them the doctrine of the Prayer Book is more clearly taught. These sermons, which are fully in line with the teaching of the Continental Reformers (some of them being translations of their writings), shed a good deal of light on the BCP and the Articles. The language is, of course, old-fashioned, but the sermons are packed full of sound theology. Every Anglican ought to read this book, as should everyone who thinks the Church of England is only semi-reformed.


ANTI-ARMINIANS OTM C: The Anglican Reformed Tradition from Charles II to George I (Oxford Theological Monographs)
ANTI-ARMINIANS OTM C: The Anglican Reformed Tradition from Charles II to George I (Oxford Theological Monographs)
by Hampton
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £97.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book fills in a gap in our knowledge (at ..., 28 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book fills in a gap in our knowledge (at least, as far as anyone I have met is concerned). The Church of England at the Restoration was not the pitiable mess it is sometimes portrayed as having been. The Arminian party was in the majority, but its doctrinal position was sufficiently weak that, when it attempted to assert itself, it was opposed by the most able scholars in the land. And it was not just at the academic level that this resistance occurred, but the most popular preachers of the day made it their business to instruct congregations in the doctrine of justification by faith alone apart from works, and to present the Reformed formularies of the Established Church to their generation.
Of course, such attempts are never without fault, and the author deals with a controversy which arose within Reformed circles over the doctrine of the Trinity—a controversy of terminology more than of doctrine.
This is a most enlightening read; if you can afford the book, buy it and learn, and if not, get your library to stock it. The Church of England is, in her formularies, a Reformed Church. Read this book and learn what that means!


Who Made God? Searching For a Theory of Everything
Who Made God? Searching For a Theory of Everything
by Edgar Harold Andrews
Edition: Hardcover

21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very helpful read, 1 Oct. 2009
Scientists (and all specialists) have a great advantage when talking or writing to laymen; they know their subject, and can use their superior knowledge to help hide inconvenient truths from their audience. It is good therefore to find a physicist who knows how to communicate complex ideas simply, who tells you when and where he has simplified his position, who states his own presuppositions openly, and who deals with objections to his thesis.
The central thesis of this book is that the only 'theory of everything' available to this world is the one revealed in the Bible. No other theory, whether it is Einstein's general relativity theory, or quantum mechanics, or string theory (I'd never heard of that one either) can answer the questions, and each one throws up more questions than it answers. If you think that sounds unlikely, wait 'til you read Professor Andrews' account of DNA and genetic investigation, what it does and does not prove. The argument of 'natural selection' has nowhere to hide, and the fall-back position of genetic mutation is exposed for the fraud it is. Many other areas of science are used to show how insuperable the problems are unless 'the God hypothesis' is considered.
Yet even here there is a need for care and accuracy. Unless all sides of the debate define 'God' there can be no debate. Professor Andrews defines God as the uncreated Creator of the universe, and, throughout the book, shows how the Bible is consistent with that definition. He also shows how science can, in the end, say nothing against that definition, partly because there are aspects to the debate which science cannot touch (it is confined to the physical world) and partly because it must acknowledge the truth of the 'God hypothesis' once the evidence has been laid out impartially.
Those who are convinced atheists and evolutionists should read this book to see that their position is far from secure. Christians who are taken in by the 'theistic evolution' argument should read it, and Christians who face challenges from evolutionists, atheists and others will be greatly helped.
What's more, it is an enjoyable read, being witty in style and accessible in content.


Page: 1