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Profile for Michael Wells Glueck > Reviews

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Michael Wells Glueck "EditAndPublishYourBook.com" (Nantucket, Massachusetts, U.S.A.)

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Opening Belle
Opening Belle
by Maureen Sherry
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.08

5.0 out of 5 stars A hilarious account of the mores of Wall Street, 10 May 2016
This review is from: Opening Belle (Hardcover)
Opening Belle accurately portrays the macho working envirinment of brokerage firms. I worked in the industry for twenty-five years, and learned about birthday parties in which a heterosexual nude couple jumped out of a giant cake and, still in the altogether, mingled with the revelers. Then there was the female fixed income portfolio manager who gleefully reported a bond salesman’s reply to her questions about an issue’s coupon, maturity, and yield to maturiey: “Oh, you must be the type who likes extended foreplay.” The antics and shenanigans described in this book are similarly raunchy and brimming with infectious humor.


The Falsifiers
The Falsifiers
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars An education for would=be polymaths, 7 May 2016
This review is from: The Falsifiers (Kindle Edition)
This novel provides a condensed version of an education in a top university in multiple fields: ethics, idealism, environmental studies, political science and strategy, international relations, history, science, relativism, engineering, management consulting.. Its characters are brilliant analysts, tacticians, and leaders of diverse nationalities and backgrounds. Its projects are exhaustively researched by teams of professionals who delve into all imaginative implications and repercussions of proposed activities. Originally written in French, it is superbly rendered into virtually impeccable English by Howard Curtis. It appears to have been inspired by John Grisham’s The Firm, but it avoids the frenetic twists of plot that seem characteristic of Grisham’s works. The Falsifiers, in my judgment, is eminently worthy of a filmmaker’s undertaking.


Clarence Olgibee
Clarence Olgibee
by Alan S. Kessler
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.01

5.0 out of 5 stars This novel by an experienced writer leads the reader into ..., 4 Mar. 2016
This review is from: Clarence Olgibee (Paperback)
This novel by an experienced writer leads the reader into unfamiliar and often subcultural settings, including a prison in which subscribing to a bigotry masked as religion provides a defense against sexual violence; an account of the personnel and cramped sailors' quarters on a U.S. military vessel; and a description of popular tourist sites as well as some of the seedier neighborhoods of Manila, where the narrator, a seaman whose ship is in port, is escorted by a well-educated and upscale female revolutionary. All of the many characters are richly drawn and fully developed, and overall this work presents an educational and edifying exploration of some of humanity's darker motives.


The Human Stain
The Human Stain
by Philip Roth
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An impressive tour de force, 6 April 2015
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
Philip Roth's The Human Stain is an excellent example of what T.S. Eliot described in his essay, "Tradition and the Individual Talent." First, let's note that "Roth" derives from the German word for red. And the surname of his petite French professor, Delphine Roux, whose interview costume of a mini-kilt and tights resembles the getup of a French poule, means reddish brown. The novel's hero, Professor Coleman Silk, aka Silberzweig, like Sammy Davis, Jr., is a pale-skinned Negro Jew who can and does pass as Caucasian. Like Hemingway's Robert Cohn, he is also an accomplished boxer. As dean of the fictional Athena College in the Berkshires, he comes to "Roux" having hired Delphine, who perversely has an unrequited crush on him. Her loneliness brings to mind the dictum of Zorba the Greek: "When a woman sleeps alone, it is a disgrace to every man." But at 71, Coleman, aided by Viagra -- whose properties I think Roth misconstrues and exaggerates -- prefers an uneducated but by no means stupid janitoress. The theme of overthrowing one's origins and succeeding in life on one's own terms seems like an illustration of Arthus Miller's essay, "The Family in Modern Drama." As in most novels, there are some improbable twists of plot, e.g., the narrator's naivete in thinking that by moving he can escape the story's villain, or the police department's failure to check Delphine's office for fingerprints after it has been trashed -- by her, not, as she claims, by the just deceased Coleman. The book contains one literary term not found in any dictionary I've consulted: diegetic; but its antecedent noun, diegesis, is defined in an online dictionary as a narrative explanation, i.e., a narrative exegesis, to which latter word it is obviously related etymologically. Roth's complex development of all the book's characters, his Jamesian sentences, and distilled wisdom render this work a tour de force well worth reading and highly recommended.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 1, 2015 2:07 PM BST


Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs and Classical Music: 1
Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs and Classical Music: 1
by Blair Tindall
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative and startling, 21 Feb. 2015
Blair Tindall has taken great pains to research the classical music world in which she has lived since she regrettably chose a music education at an institution in North Carolina, where she never learned how to calculate percentages, instead of Exeter in New Hampshire, where her brother excelled to an extent that probably intimidated her. She wished to play flute, but by the time the person handing out free instruments reached the "T's" there were no more flutes, so she chose the smallest instrument available, an oboe -- a choice that has intermittently plagued her with related reed problems throughout her career. Generally isolated from audiences and the overall society alike, she essentially became a musical groupie, available for gigs and affairs with older conductors and performers regardless of their marital status. She catalogues her many lovers, only one of whom, a St. Thomas scuba diver named Eric, seems to have turned her on. Most startlingly, she names them all, including a prominent conductor who at the time of her liaison was already married to the woman who remains his wife and is the mother of his children. Of course, many young female musicians sleep with their mentors. In the 1970s, when I sang in the chorus of the Marlboro, Vermont music festival performing Beethoven's Choral Fantasy under the direction of Rudolf Serkin, I met a lovely young violinist of 24 who was openly having an affair with a dapper, silver-haired, 57 year-old violist. But I wouldn't name them publicly, as Ms. Tindall has done. She ends her book at age 44, an accomplished musician, journalist, and author who has recognized the self-destructiveness of having allowed herself to be used sexually, but unmarried and childless. Her account of having tried the Hamptons singles scene in hopes of meeting a man traces her distress at being outclassed by the posh competition at a bar scene that she fled in order to spend the weekend with an accompanying female friend as guests of an alternatively oriented colleague whose partner had recently expired. Her story elicits compassionate pity and recognition of a too-familiar plight. One wishes her well.


On His Own Terms: A Life of Nelson Rockefeller
On His Own Terms: A Life of Nelson Rockefeller
by Richard Norton Smith
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £29.07

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A timely account of the Republican Party's schizophrenia, 8 Jan. 2015
Laced wtith humor, some of it bawdy, this encyclopedic account of the governor's successful battle with Goldwater conservatives foreshadows the current split between dogmatic Tea Party ideologues and more moderate, thoughtful, and intelligent conservatives like Rand Paul. Rockefeller's love of art, inherited from his mother, is justly emphasized, but his take on classical music was that it puts one to sleep. Not everyone shared his taste in art: some legislators were tempted to refer some of the works Rockefeller hung in official buildings to the state's commission on pornography, and some wags called the Governor's South Mall development "Rocky's last erection." Professor Smith cites "the funniest thing Rockefeller ever said in Albany" in a press release: "Governor and Mrs. Rockefeller came to Lockport accompanied by District Attorney and Mrs. John A. Ball of Buffalo. Following the cocktail party in the afternoon, the Governor was taken back to Buffalo by the Balls." One night, leaving the Plaza Hotel in Manhattan after an acrimonious meeting with Mayor John Lindsay, Rockefeller asked an aide, "Why do you think he hates me so?" "It is really quite simple," replied the assistant. "You get laid more often than he does." "Naw,,," gushed Rockefeller, feigning shock at the display of lese-majeste. "Do you really think so?" The grin on his face said it all. But Happy Rockefeller didn't grin when she saw another aide poke her husband in the ribs at a campaign stop "to signal the proximity of a well-endowed woman." "I can see what you're doing," said his exasperated wife. JFK wondered how a man could "love love" more than he "loves politics." The answer is soul.


Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program That Brought Nazi Scientists to America
Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program That Brought Nazi Scientists to America
by Annie Jacobsen
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing implications about the quality of American universities, 12 April 2014
What no reviewer seems to have pointed out is the apparent superiority of German universities such as those at Goettingen and Tuebingen, whose scientific graduates, while no more intelligent than their U.S. or British counterparts, were light-years ahead in military applications of physics and chemistry. No other country's scientists were capable of producing the V-2 rockets or -- Sputnik's German creators not excepted -- satellites. German exchange students in our high schools regularly report that they aren't being taught anything that they haven't already learned. John J. McCloy's view that it was preferable to employ even virulently anti-Semitic Nazi scientists in our military-industrial complex rather than allow the Soviets to reap the advantages of their contributions is arguably cogent.


The Roberts Court: The Struggle for the Constitution
The Roberts Court: The Struggle for the Constitution
by Marcia Coyle
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £21.46

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You can buy an audible version for $6.95..., 11 May 2013
... as a new customer on the Downpour website. It's the same audible version with the same excellent, obviously well educated, paced, and cadenced, narrator, Bernadette Dunne. The Kindle edition does not have the audio-enabled feature.


The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder
The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder
by Charles Graeber
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A riveting account of a compulsive and devious serial killer, 8 May 2013
First we watch the villain relieve stress by committing both random and targeted homicides of hospital patients, including many to whom he was not assigned. Then we witness hospitals' efforts to protect their finances against lawsuits and to preserve their reputations take precedence over their obligation to protect patients. We wish we could share our knowledge with police and private detectives attempting to unravel the causes of a burgeoning number of mysterious inpatient deaths. Finally, and most thrillingly, we participate vicariously in the reconstruction of the crimes' methodology by a nurse who recognizes in the villain an echo of an uncle who repeatedly molested her when she was a child unable to convince her parents of the truth of her accusations. In the process we learn about machines called Pyxis and Cerner that infallibly record nurses' drug orders and inpatients' medical histories. I sat in the back yard, activated the audio feature of the Kindle edition, and listened to the pleasant voice of a woman who reads quickly but who reveals her imperfect education and perhaps political preference by pronouncing "résumé" as "resume" and "Iraq" as "Eye-RACK."


Stalin's Barber: A Novel
Stalin's Barber: A Novel
by Paul M. Levitt
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece from a prolific writer and teacher of writing, 13 Jan. 2013
Paul Michael Levitt's bibliography is to literature what Franz Joseph Haydn's known works are to music. Stalin's Barber is, in my view, the best, most carefully researched, authentic, and compelling opus in his vast corpus of novels and non-fictional writings. I am honored to have made some modest suggestions while the work was in progress, as the author graciously notes in the Acknowledgments. In the process of being initiated into the inner mysteries of the Kremlin and introduced to life in some of the provinces, the reader expands his knowledge of Russian terminology and geography. The accounts of Stalin's doubles and of the ritual of alcoholic flaming of his sideburns' stubble without singeing the skin are especially fascinating. Dr. Levitt writes for the joy of writing, not for the associated remuneration, but this novel seems destined to enrich him in both senses.


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