Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle New Album - Foo Fighters Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for A Travel Book Lover > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by A Travel Book ...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 7,039,975
Helpful Votes: 26

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
A Travel Book Lover (San Francisco, CA USA)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Enchanted Tarot: Book and Tarot Deck
The Enchanted Tarot: Book and Tarot Deck
by Amy Zerner
Edition: Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply the best tarot/book set available!, 5 April 2011
Monte Farber and Amy Zerner are the world's most renowned creators of self-help and guidance systems. One of their most overlooked titles, "The Enchanted Tarot", is a highly regarded classic within the tarot community. Released in 1992, this book and tarot deck set set the standard for the art of tarot reading, taking readers on a journey through our dual world of The Dreaming and The Awakening, finally transcending to a higher consciousness.

The book is beautifully written by Farber, whose expertise as a proven psychic is employed in helping readers to get the most out of the tarot. He covers the various methods in utilizing this unique system for gaining insight and wisdom on how to overcome adversity and solving everyday problems in today's chaotic society through the meanings of the 78 tarot cards, which each convey a message to our conscious and unconscious selves.

The manner in which the interpretations of the cards are presented is quite different from what tarot readers are most used to. Instead of the typical upright/reversed meanings practiced by most tarot schools, Farber breaks down the interpretations into three(3) separate levels: The Dream, The Awakening, and The Enchantment. The Dream gives the symbolic meaning via a story-like narrative, The Awakening a straightforward elaboration, and The Enchantment an actual exercise to infuse positive energy into the card representing your life. Of note is the omission of the "reversed" card meaning to allay any fears and negative thoughts often associated with it, which I personally thought was a sincere and nice touch by Farber; a tarot deck which can do you no harm.

Equally impressive is Amy Zerner's colorful and richly detailed artwork, expertly lending credence to Farber's prophetic vision. The cards, although a bit oversized, are sumptuous with an Edwardian flavor that evokes a more simpler, romantic period than today's frenzied pace. The cards are also cleverly color-coded based on suit and healing power: Hearts Purple, Pentacles Green, Wands Red, and Swords Blue. What really sets The Enchanted Tarot's artwork apart from most other tarot sets is that Zerner's illustrations are not merely paintings rendered on a computer. Each image is actually a 2' X 1' fabric collage tapestry painstakingly laid out, and then sewn together in her unique, exquisite style. These gorgeous, award-winning works of art are recognized as paintings by the National Endowment for the Arts. The colorful illustrations are also well represented in the glossy high-quality book, which you don't often find in most tarot/book sets these days.

The conclusion of the book includes a short section on preparing for and doing actual readings, using the three most popular layouts in tarot: The One-Card, Three-Card, and the beloved Celtic Cross spreads. All-in-all, Farber's "The Enchanted Tarot" is a benign and gentle tarot. Zerner's stunning illustrations bring Farber's words to life and vice versa, as they complement each other. "The Enchanted Tarot" may not fall in line with those who might prefer a more traditional approach to the tarot, but with one of the highest accuracy rates in the world amongst living tarot readers, Farber's system should not be taken lightly. Instead, it should be looked upon as a consummate tool for those who are looking for self-help through alternative means. "The Enchanted Tarot" is just too damn good that I'm doing to do something which I've never done before using a 5-star rating system. I'm giving this one 6 stars with the highest recommendations. WELL DONE, MONTE AND AMY!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 13, 2014 10:36 PM BST


The Divining Hand
The Divining Hand
by Christopher Bird
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just a book on dowsing, it is THE book on dowsing!, 10 Mar. 2011
This review is from: The Divining Hand (Hardcover)
More than 20 years since its publication, "The Divining Hand: The 500-Year Old Mystery of Dowsing" by Christopher Bird continues to serve as "The Bible of Dowsing" for many seasoned enthusiasts and new students alike to this ages-old practice. Dowsing is generally defined as the search for anything that can be thought of- lost objects, missing persons and pets, water, oil, mineral, and much more. This is truly a one-in-a-kind book, unlike most others which usually cover the subject of dowsing from a hypothetical standpoint. Bird's unique style takes readers on a journey through the history of dowsing, from its origins to the present day, and how it has shaped and defined the lives of many peoples and cultures along the way. Not merely a "how-to" manual on dowsing, Bird offers many insights into this unique art form, exposing its full potential via documented cases, scientific data, newspaper clippings, and supplemental photographs taken during actual field searches and digs, held tightly together by his narrative convictions.

Dowsing is carried out through various methods, usually with a y-shaped rod cut from a tree branch, a metal rod bent at a 45-degree angle and rotating inside a tube, or a pendulum swinging freely from a hanging cord. By walking over a designated area with one of these tools in hand, it is possible to locate, for example, an underground well based on when the rod bobs, or where the pendulum points. It is also popularly used as a divination tool to forecast the weather, future events, insight and wisdom, as well as finding alternative remedies for healing. Many skeptics and naysayers have dismissed dowsing as nothing more than old-world nonsense which has no place in today's science-driven society of rationalization and reasoning. Bird counters with valid arguments of his own- How does a child first learn to walk? How are flock of geese able to migrate to the same place year after year? And, what about the countless stories of pets being able to find their families at their new homes thousands of miles away after being left behind? These are some of the questions posed by Bird which have even left some of the world's most renowned scientists miffed and without any scientific explanations. Many have attributed this to the involuntary movement factor caused by the sub-conscious mind, but numerous experiments conducted by scientists and luminaries throughout the past few centuries have contradicted this support.

As the style of the book's presentation is a chronicle into the history of dowsing, it has become the text of choice for those who are seriously interested in delving deeper into the mysteries of this ancient and sacred practice. One of the best ways to learn about dowsing is through the actual experiences of others, and TDH just about covers the entire spectrum of all the well-known and respected authorities in the field. Two such accounts include the works of Jim W. Kid and Jean Auscher. Kidd, a foreman of a dairy farm, was contracted by the Misquamicut Golf Club in Watch Hill, Rhode Island concerning a water shortage which threatened the golf course with possible closure. Kidd was able to achieve in a matter of hours with his y-rod what the club could not do over many years and after spending tens of thousands of dollars on consultative digging; He had located a water vein, as well as where to dig and how deep. The well that sprung from Kidd's finding initially produced 100 gallons of water per minute. 10 years later, it was reported that the well was still pumping out 80 gallons of water per minute!

What is even more astonishing, if unbelievable, is the art of map dowsing, or locating any missing items and/or person(s) through the use of a map and a pendulum. For many, this abstract form of dowsing is hard to fathom as there is actually no substance of reference beneath the digger's feet as is the norm with field dowsing. Jean Auscher, a French pendulum dowser with one of the highest accuracy rates recorded in the field, successfully assisted the police in the recovery of 2 million francs that was stolen from the Societe Technique des Sables de la Seine in Paris, tracing the safe-crackers back to their hideout in another part of the city by using this method. Other incredible stories documented by Bird include that of Paul Clement Brown, whose un-orthodox form of map dowsing and uncanny ability allow him to effortlessly find water, metal, and other kinds of mining ore, and the U.S. military's use of L-rods to locate underground Viet Cong bunkers, tunnels, and booby traps during the Vietnam War.

I've been a skeptic for a good part of my life where anything not rationalized by pure, hard scientific facts are concerned. Several incidents have since changed my outlook: I've had numerous encounters with the paranormal, becoming more frequent in recent years. Then last year, we had a problem with the sewage system when tree roots had breached the pipe, causing waste to overflow out onto the street. Prior to the digging phase, a water department engineer was dispatched to the site for inspection. Using just an l-rod, flags, paper, and pen, he was able to mark the exact location where the roots had broken into the pipe- something which the snake camera failed to do due to obstruction. I often find myself using a pendulum whenever I need to make quick decisions, feel like I'm going in circles, or just plain stuck, which usually works well for me in these types of situations.

Whether just a coincidence, or the involvement of a "sixth" sense as suggested by Bird where the human body acts as a sensitive receiver attuned to the earth's signal with the aid of an "amplifying" rod, how and why dowsing works may never be fully explained, but it does work. Dowsing has stood the test of time, having always been able to help solve problems where other known methods have failed. Until it can be proven otherwise, dowsing will continue to be an asset to human society, and no other book and author has worked so diligently as Christopher Bird's "The Divining Hand" in making the case for dowsing and ensuring that it is given its proper due. If you're only able to buy one book on dowsing, then let it be this one. It teaches not only the fundamentals of dowsing, but also gives the user a historical primer on dowsing, and the important role it has played throughout time. Measuring in at a generous 8 1/2 inches wide, 11" inches long, and 327 pages thick, this colossus of a book is even larger than the textbook we used in U.S. History 17A in college, and well worth every penny. I just can't recommend "The Divining Hand" enough, because it is so well-written and full of documented first-hand accounts that readers may be hard-pressed not to be convinced! 5 OUT OF 5 STARS!


The Divining Hand: The 500 Year-old Mystery of Dowsing
The Divining Hand: The 500 Year-old Mystery of Dowsing
by Christopher Bird
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just a book on dowsing, it is THE book on dowsing!, 8 Mar. 2011
More than 20 years since its publication, "The Divining Hand: The 500-Year Old Mystery of Dowsing" by Christopher Bird continues to serve as "The Bible of Dowsing" for many seasoned enthusiasts and new students alike to this ages-old practice. Dowsing is generally defined as the search for anything that can be thought of- lost objects, missing persons and pets, water, oil, mineral, and much more. This is truly a one-in-a-kind book, unlike most others which usually cover the subject of dowsing from a hypothetical standpoint. Bird's unique style takes readers on a journey through the history of dowsing, from its origins to the present day, and how it has shaped and defined the lives of many peoples and cultures along the way. Not merely a "how-to" manual on dowsing, Bird offers many insights into this unique art form, exposing its full potential via documented cases, scientific data, newspaper clippings, and supplemental photographs taken during actual field searches and digs, held tightly together by his narrative convictions.

Dowsing is carried out through various methods, usually with a y-shaped rod cut from a tree branch, a metal rod bent at a 45-degree angle and rotating inside a tube, or a pendulum swinging freely from a hanging cord. By walking over a designated area with one of these tools in hand, it is possible to locate, for example, an underground well based on when the rod bobs, or where the pendulum points. It is also popularly used as a divination tool to forecast the weather, future events, insight and wisdom, as well as finding alternative remedies for healing. Many skeptics and naysayers have dismissed dowsing as nothing more than old-world nonsense which has no place in today's science-driven society of rationalization and reasoning. Bird counters with valid arguments of his own- How does a child first learn to walk? How are flock of geese able to migrate to the same place year after year? And, what about the countless stories of pets being able to find their families at their new homes thousands of miles away after being left behind? These are some of the questions posed by Bird which have even left some of the world's most renowned scientists miffed and without any scientific explanations. Many have attributed this to the involuntary movement factor caused by the sub-conscious mind, but numerous experiments conducted by scientists and luminaries throughout the past few centuries have contradicted this support.

As the style of the book's presentation is a chronicle into the history of dowsing, it has become the text of choice for those who are seriously interested in delving deeper into the mysteries of this ancient and sacred practice. One of the best ways to learn about dowsing is through the actual experiences of others, and TDH just about covers the entire spectrum of all the well-known and respected authorities in the field. Two such accounts include the works of Jim W. Kid and Jean Auscher. Kidd, a foreman of a dairy farm, was contracted by the Misquamicut Golf Club in Watch Hill, Rhode Island concerning a water shortage which threatened the golf course with possible closure. Kidd was able to achieve in a matter of hours with his y-rod what the club could not do over many years and after spending tens of thousands of dollars on consultative digging; He had located a water vein, as well as where to dig and how deep. The well that sprung from Kidd's finding initially produced 100 gallons of water per minute. 10 years later, it was reported that the well was still pumping out 80 gallons of water per minute!

What is even more astonishing, if unbelievable, is the art of map dowsing, or locating any missing items and/or person(s) through the use of a map and a pendulum. For many, this abstract form of dowsing is hard to fathom as there is actually no substance of reference beneath the digger's feet as is the norm with field dowsing. Jean Auscher, a French pendulum dowser with one of the highest accuracy rates recorded in the field, successfully assisted the police in the recovery of 2 million francs that was stolen from the Societe Technique des Sables de la Seine in Paris, tracing the safe-crackers back to their hideout in another part of the city by using this method. Other incredible stories documented by Bird include that of Paul Clement Brown, whose un-orthodox form of map dowsing and uncanny ability allow him to effortlessly find water, metal, and other kinds of mining ore, and the U.S. military's use of L-rods to locate underground Viet Cong bunkers, tunnels, and booby traps during the Vietnam War.

I've been a skeptic for a good part of my life where anything not rationalized by pure, hard scientific facts are concerned. Several incidents have since changed my outlook: I've had numerous encounters with the paranormal, becoming more frequent in recent years. Then last year, we had a problem with the sewage system when tree roots had breached the pipe, causing waste to overflow out onto the street. Prior to the digging phase, a water department engineer was dispatched to the site for inspection. Using just an l-rod, flags, paper, and pen, he was able to mark the exact location where the roots had broken into the pipe- something which the snake camera failed to do due to obstruction. I often find myself using a pendulum whenever I need to make quick decisions, feel like I'm going in circles, or just plain stuck, which usually works well for me in these types of situations.

Whether just a coincidence, or the involvement of a "sixth" sense as suggested by Bird where the human body acts as a sensitive receiver attuned to the earth's signal with the aid of an "amplifying" rod, how and why dowsing works may never be fully explained, but it does work. Dowsing has stood the test of time, having always been able to help solve problems where other known methods have failed. Until it can be proven otherwise, dowsing will continue to be an asset to human society, and no other book and author has worked so diligently as Christopher Bird's "The Divining Hand" in making the case for dowsing and ensuring that it is given its proper due. If you're only able to buy one book on dowsing, then let it be this one. It teaches not only the fundamentals of dowsing, but also gives the user a historical primer on dowsing, and the important role it has played throughout time. Measuring in at a generous 8 1/2 inches wide, 11" inches long, and 327 pages thick, this colossus of a book is even larger than the textbook we used in U.S. History 17A in college, and well worth every penny. I just can't recommend "The Divining Hand" enough, because it is so well-written and full of documented first-hand accounts that readers may be hard-pressed not to be convinced! 5 OUT OF 5 STARS!


Famiglia Card Game
Famiglia Card Game
Offered by docsmagic
Price: £11.79

5.0 out of 5 stars Fun, simple card game with strategy!, 26 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Famiglia Card Game (Toy)
Players: 2 to 4 players
Age: 8 and up.
Length: 30 mins.

Contents: 60 cards- 4 families of 15 cards each; there are 5 cards with value 0, 4 with 1, 3 with 2, 2 with 3, and 1 with 4;
(this includes two starting sets of 4 cards each with one value 0 from each family with backs unique to each set), rules sheet

As part of Rio Grande's lineup of releases for the winter, Famiglia is a promising new game that takes the ages-old simplicity of card gaming to all-new heights, bringing the kind of fun and depth that would otherwise be reserved for strategic board games. Board game guru Friedmann Friese made this a high priority prior to undertaking this project. Full of excitement and pressure, two players butt heads as mafia lords who compete to recruit the best members into their gang and emerge victorious as head mafia boss. Requiring strategy, wit, and a bit of luck, Famiglia is ideal for those who are into two-player fast-paced games that never lets up in its intensity during game play.

Players must choose the most promising gang members four other families- The Accountants, La Famiglia, The Brutes, and The Mercenaries. Each of the four families are inherent with their own unique skills and attributes as indicated by their namesake. Wanna thug? Call on The Brutes. Need a math wiz to crunch the numbers? How about someone from The Accountants? Who you choose, and in which order you choose may determine the outcome of the game at the end. Famiglia allow players to manipulate the choices which his/her opponent may have their eye on, so careful attention must be given to your opponent's strategy. Each card is worth a certain number of points depending on its type. Lower ranking members are usually recruited in the hopes that they may help to influence more valuable gang members to join later on. The player with the most accumulated points at the end wins.

It's hard to believe that a card game could combine such depth and strategy. Whenever I think of card games, the first thing that pops up into my head is poker or blackjack. To open a seemingly simple deck of cards as this, and to discover the array of elements involved is just mind-boggling. It has definitely made me look at card games in a whole new light, as the possibilities are endless. What really makes Famiglia great is that games are usually no longer than 30 minutes, and the minimal contents and packaging encourages potential players to get involved who are otherwise intimidated by the physical complexity of strategic games. Since it's compact, it can be easily transported and played anywhere by anyone, whether at home or at the local pub. Simple, fun, yet with depth, card games such as Famiglia are probably the next big trend in strategy games. 5 OUT OF 5 STARS


Horus Board Game
Horus Board Game
Offered by A Word To The Wise Ltd
Price: £24.60

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great strategy game reminiscent of the classics!, 26 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Horus Board Game (Toy)
Players: 2 to 4 players
Age: 10 and up.
Length: 60 minutes

Contents: 54 Card, 120 Tiles, 80 Wooden Kingdom Markers, 1 Tile Bag, Rules

Horus is Mayfair's Egyptian-themed, tile-laying game where players set up and expand their territory along the sacred Nile River. As their influence grows, they venture into new territories in hopes of gaining favor from Horus, the falcon-headed god. This game is not as complicated as I first thought, but a bit of strategy is still, nonetheless, required. Certain decisions must be made; what kind of terrain will the desert become? How and where do you plan to block your opponents from expanding their territory? Clever playing of the cards and tiles is the key to determining the outcome of the game. The player with the most points scored from the influence in the different placed terrain tiles wins the game.

Each player gets 20 wooden bits in whatever color they choose(four different colors for up to 4 players- black, blue, white and gold). Random tiles are then shuffled and placed in the bag while selection tiles are separated into five different piles representing each of the 5 different terrain- marsh, river, hills, farmland, desert. After initially placing three river tiles (one river start, two river ends) to mark the starting point of the game, each player performs a series of actions in the following order during each turn: 1.) Drawing a tile and placing it on the board. If it's a terrain tile it can be placed anywhere, but usually next to a tile of the same terrain and as long as they don't block the future course of the Nile River's flow. If it's a river tile, the player places it on either of the spots where the river end tiles sits, which in turn is moved adjacent to the selected river tile. The player then draws another river tile from the stack and places it adjacent to a river tile. If they so choose, they may turn the tile over to reveal its Necropolis side. The Necropolis mostly acts as a deterrent against other players from expanding to a spot adjacent to it, and doesn't figure in the scoring. If a Horus tile is chosen, it can only be placed adjacent to a river tile, but will double the score of any player's terrain that border's it. 2.) Play a card from your hand. Selecting a card from your hand, a tile matching the terrain as indicated on the card must be selected from the stack and placed on the board as according to the rules. 3.) Place influence markers. You then take wooden influence marker and place it atop a free space terrain that matches the size number as indicated on the card you've just played; it doesn't have to match the terrain type on the card. Should the card played is a river transport card, you can then place two adjoining river tiles from the stack and move an influence marker from one territory adjoining the river to another. 4.) Draw a card to replenish any non-river transport cards played from the hand. The game ends once two types of terrains have been exhausted. The points are then tallied for each territory based on a scoring system, and the player with the most points wins.

Horus is one of the funnest all-around games I have played in recent years. The tile-laying aspect of it is quite simple, yet there is enough depth to keep participants involved and coming back for more. Another plus is that games usually last about 30 minutes, so it won't hold up anyone with a busy schedule, and allows for new layers to join in. Horus is similar in nature to other classics like Dominoes and Cribbage in that it can be played by people of all ages, and is the kind of game you would often find going on in a pub, open square, or park. It also works well as a teaching tool for children. Designer Jean Vanaise has showed his genius with the development of this game. By incorporating the best elements of gaming with his own ideas and the visual presentation of the stunning artwork in the game pieces, he has created a timeless classic with a style that is uniquely his and will be a main fixture in the board game industry for generations to come. 5 OUT OF 5 STARS


No Title Available

4.0 out of 5 stars Quite fun, as good a pirate-themed board game you'll find., 13 Feb. 2011
Players: 2 to 4 players
Age: 8 and up.
Length: 30 mins.

Contents: 1 game board, 6 pirate ships, 4X7 bribing cards, 4 card holders, 16 treasure chests, 35 Coins

It's been nearly 7 years since the release of Caribbean, and it's hard to believe that this gem is now just starting to pick up steam within the gaming community. Many have dubbed it one of the most underrated games of all time, really an understatement that does it no justice. The brainchild of Michail Antonow and Peter Schliemann, Caribbean is a very fun game that pits players against one another in trying to bribe as many different pirate ships to pick up and offload treasure onto their own "safe haven" ports.

The object of the game is quite simple: the player with the most accumulated treasure at the end wins. Players don't actually own their own ship, and it is through the bribing of the pirates with rum that determine who controls the movement of what ship, and by how many spaces. This is accomplished by players bidding for all 6 ships at once by comparing each others' bribing cards, the highest bidder winning the right to move the selected ship the number of spaces indicated on the card. Pirates are anything but honorable, and will do whatever it takes to get their hands on their rum. This includes the swapping of treasure between ships, and the unexpected robbery of treasure from other passing ships.

Because the game is broken down into rounds, anyone has a chance of coming from behind to hit payday by out-maneuvering and out-planning their opponents. It's also more tactical and strategic than expected, but easy enough for kids of all ages to learn and play. The game is a bit predictable, since you know what ships other players are trying to bribe, but this is augmented by the option of bluffing which adds some excitement back into play.

The components of the game are for the most part of high quality and manufactured in Germany. The artwork of the game board is quite nicely done, a colorfully laid out map with spaces marking individual movement of the ships. The bribe rack works well enough to accomodate the well-constructed durable cards. and the treasure tokens fit easily on the ships. The ships' cardboard construction, however, are somewhat flimsy and prone to falling apart with prolonged play. This is only a minor inconvenience, and can be rectified with a little Elmer's Glue.

Part of the fun in Caribbean is re-creating the real life actions of a historical period in time, such as sailing a pirate's ship through the treacherous oceans of the scaled-down world. This brings back very fond memories of a Life board game that we used to have lying around the house. I was only 5 years old at the time, and didn't really understand the rules of the game. I just loved moving the car token on the road, especially crossing the bridge over the river.

Overall, Caribbean is a very fun, solid game that isn't overly complex or too long, and the few surprises that come along with it, such as having your treasure stolen from you when you least expect it adds some tense and exciting moments throughout. It's also a great teaching tool for children as it re-inforces certain concepts which they will need later in life, such as counting and making bids. Whether you're a serious gamer or an occasional player, or you just have some time on your hands to kill, Caribbean will offer countless hours of entertainment, and is a wonderful addition to any game collection! I can easily recommend this game for family nights, social gatherings, or even just to get the kids away from the videogame console for just a few hours.


Titania's Crystal Ball
Titania's Crystal Ball
by Titania Hardie
Edition: Misc. Supplies
Price: £22.98

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great crystal ball set, at less than the cost of a tarot deck!, 5 Feb. 2011
"Look into the crystal ball, and tell me what you see?" With such cliched phrases made famous in countless movies, TV show, and books, the realm of crystallomancy, or the divine art of scrying through the use of any object crystal in nature, has always fascinated me. "Titania's Crystal Ball: Now You Can See the Future" by Titania Hardie brings back memories of my childhood, which was a very interesting to say the least. Having grown up surrounded by family and friends who were often superstitious and into the occult, gatherings at the dinner table or around the fireplace often involved ghost stories and conversations hinging on the world of the physical living, as well as of the spiritual, with a fortune telling or two thrown in.

Crystallomancy, or scrying through the use of crystalline objects is probably one of the oldest and most well-known forms of divination in the world. At the forefront of this practice is the crystal ball, used for many centuries by fortune tellers, seers, and psychics in obtaining insight and wisdom to foresee future events and possibilities. It is also an important tool for artists, writers, and other professionals who use it to connect with their subconscious minds to help foster creativity, development, and problem solving. Those who are familiar with the crystal ball will tell you that it's not the flashy, glowing images popping out in lucid 3D as portrayed in Hollywood films, but is more of a transcendental experience of looking into oneself for answers through serene meditation and state of mind.

Titania's Crystal Ball is the introduction for those who are interested in learning to use the crystal ball. This set includes a quality globe crystal, wooden stand and companion book. It's like having Britain's top white witch as your personal guide to the world of crystallomancy, and at a fraction of the cost for a crystal ball alone, this is truly an unbelievable value. I must also add that the ball is not quite large; it is slightly smaller than a regulation tennis ball, but it's still bigger than the one that belonged to my uncle. The wooden stand that comes along with the set is also less flimsier, ensuring that the ball doesn't accidentally fall off of its perch.

In the book, Titania guides beginners through the rudiments of crystallomancy, covering such basics as gazing into the crystal through meditation, what to expect during your initial experiences, as well as the usual purification rituals observed in most other divination practices. Hardie also gives suggestions in how to interpret meanings of images users may pick up from the ball, although she encourages looking deep into oneself for any interpretations, because it is there where the real answers lie.

Other suggestions for use with the crystal ball include contacting your spiritual guide, astral projection, transcendence, and keeping a journal off your experiences. Such keen observations are tantamount to the important work that experienced mediums such as Hardie have dedicated their entire lifetime to. The result of such loving devotion is this wonderful tool for connecting with the most precious resource available- the human heart. 5 OUT OF 5 STARS.


Magic Mirror: Developing Your Second Sight Through Scrying
Magic Mirror: Developing Your Second Sight Through Scrying
by John Nelson
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best mirror scrying kit available on the market!, 1 Feb. 2011
In his latest offering "The Magic Mirror", screenwriter and visionary John Nelson introduces readers to the practice of "mirror scrying", drawing from a background of over 20 years experience as teacher and student of metaphysics and transpersonal psychology.

Mirrors have always been a part of everyday life. Its exact origins are unknown, but it is said to have been used by the Greeks as early as 400 B.C. Their reflective property not only portray a representation of our physical form, but gives us a glimpse into our inner self by bridging with our subconscious minds.

"The Magic Mirror" by John Nelson is an invaluable tool that allows one to harness the full potential of the subconscious being through the ancient art of scrying. "Scrying", per se, is any form of divination by received messagess from glancing into a crystal ball, or a bowl of water as was famously practiced by Nostradamus. In modern times, the special "blackened mirrors" have become the preferred medium of choice.

Nelson's spiritual and metaphysical concepts are explained in an easy-to-understand approach, making it more accessible to newcomers while being relevant enough for even the most seasoned practitioner. The kit includes a beautifully crafted black mirror w/ stand, book, and instructional CD in an attractive box. The book is nicely writen, and goes into detail about the history of scrying, developing your own intuitive abilities, and how to get the most out of interpretations for everyday problem solving and insight. Nelson mentions about seeing smoke, clouds and colors, which I was unsuccessful in experiencing in my first attempt. During the second time around, and after over an hour of quietude and concentration, I noticed what appeared to be a colorless cloud forming for a brief few seconds before completely disappearing. Was it merely a trick of the light, or something more than that? Far from being an athiest, I am a skeptical individual of science who is open to all possibilities accompanied by evidence. My experience not only resulted in what I saw, but a strange feeling ran throughought my entire body as well, something that I'll never forget. WOW!

Whether you're a believer in the occult or not, this wonderfully complete package has everything you'll need to get started in the art of scrying. What really impressed me the most was the gorgeous mirror and stand, a conversation piece in itself and a definite keepsake that would fit nicely on top of any mantle. And, at a fraction of the cost of similar stand-alone mirrors sold elsewhere, it is also an incredible value. "The Magic Mirror" is by far one of the most interesting metaphysical tools I have ever used, and would make an ideal gift or addition to any library collection. I highly recommend it to anyone with even the slightest interest in the occult/metaphysics. 5 OUT OF 5 STARS.


Page: 1