Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Learn more Fitbit
Profile for b > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by b
Top Reviewer Ranking: 637,591
Helpful Votes: 635

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
b

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-18
pixel
Dominion
Dominion
Price: £0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Under Nazi rule, 22 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dominion (Kindle Edition)
An exciting thriller set in an England defeated in the second world war . Sansom develops creates a rich atmosphere of a London enveloped in a thick fog and the tangles of civil service bureaucracy.


Kindle Fire HD 7", Dolby Audio, Dual-Band Wi-Fi [Previous Generation]
Kindle Fire HD 7", Dolby Audio, Dual-Band Wi-Fi [Previous Generation]

20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just so frustrating, 10 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Initially I was excited by the KIndle fire HD- it seemed to have all the features of a small tablet, rapid internet access, fast downloading of a wide variety of books and apps, a beautiful clear screen- it looks fantastic and has amazing potential.

Yet after a couple of weeks, I find that I am rarely touching it, frustrated by the clumsiness of the internet access, the slow responses and constantly having to type in the same websites, the unresponsive touch screen and as for youtube.. you can load a video, it plays and then two minutes later it'll tell you it can't play it.

So my feeling is it could be an amazing device but it's let down by its rubbish software. I would give it three stars but I feel the fact you have to pay extra for a mains charger and screen protection is outrageous. While some books offer good value, they're not always cheaper and given the fact you're having to pay VAT, it's not such a great bargain!
Comment Comments (10) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 2, 2013 10:27 PM GMT


Searching for John Ford
Searching for John Ford
by Joseph McBride
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Contradictions of John Ford, 31 May 2010
Joseph McBride's epic biography of film director John Ford revisits the life of one of Hollywood's most complicated and fascinating figures; it is the story of a man always conscious of his Irish roots, whose films came to embody an aspect of the American spirit- the battle to impose the values of society across the vast inhospitable landscapes of the American west. Ford came to be seen as a figure of American conservatism, yet as McBride opens up the many sides to his character, we can appreciate the meanings and messages of his films and how his portrayal of the American past reflected his perception of the America he experienced.

Ford can never have been an easy director to work for. His treatment of his actors was often rude and highly manipulative and he seemed to struggle with the demands of being a husband and a father. However his relations with those he worked with most closely, figures such as John Wayne, James Stewart and Harry Carey survived many films and in some cases, lasted for decades. The John Ford Stock Company formed the core cast of many of his most famous productions and Ford performed many acts of kindness towards them and their families.

As the founder of John Ford's Field Photographic Branch, Ford recognised the importance of photographic reconaissance to America during the Second World War and his involvement with the Navy was recognised with medals and honours, his work demonstrating an unquestioning patriotism that was perhaps only called into question by the discomforts caused by the HUAC investigations.

This biography pays closes attention to the artistic, the military and the political aspects of Ford's life. It is a fascinating account of a rich and controversial figure who was often misunderstood by his more 'liberal' peers. Unfortunately the production of the paperback lets down its excellent content- the type is uncomfortably small and photographs are reproduced poorly. However I would urge anyone interested in the history of American cinema to read this excellent biography.


Swahili For The Broken-Hearted
Swahili For The Broken-Hearted
by Peter Moore
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining Account of A Gruelling Trip, 31 May 2010
Peter Moore's account of his trip through Africa is an enjoyable read. He portrays himself as a slighlty naive traveller willing to experience painful travelling conditions to find out more about Africa as he journeys from Cape Town to Cairo. His writing feels honest and straightforward and can be hilariously funny. He is the butt of his best jokes and his persitent misadventures with women are entertaining. Some of the descriptions of the places he visits are vivid and make you wish you could go there. His account of the rock churches in Ethiopia is particularly strking. However in other sections of the book you do find yourself wondering (as he does) what he is doing there. I enjoyed reading the book as I have enjoyed a number of Moore's books but at the end I felt I had learnt very little about Africa itself.


Freddie Mercury: The Definitive Biography
Freddie Mercury: The Definitive Biography
by Lesley-Ann Jones
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Special Star, 20 May 2010
I'm naturally a bit cautious about any book that declares itself to be a definitive biography. This book offers an insight into Freddie Mercury's lifestyle, his parties and his complex relations with partners of both genders. It traces his upbringing in Zanzibar and his education in India and the writer has travelled widely to gain a firsthand knowledge of his life. It is an entertaining read about one of rock's most elusive characters, whose extravagant stage performances masked his natural modesty and shyness. Although the writer has had only limited access to some crucial figures in Mercury's life, she paints a sympathetic portrayal of the man himself. Yet some sections of his life receive comparatively little attention. His first years in London are hardly discussed but in my opinion the major shortcoming of this book is the lack of attention given to Mercury's music and his development as a songwriter.


Lips: I Love the 80's - Game Only (Xbox 360)
Lips: I Love the 80's - Game Only (Xbox 360)
Offered by SamuelUKMedia
Price: £37.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lips Goes from Strength to Strength, 20 May 2010
As more collections of songs become available for Lips, the game gets more and more fun with more choices to attempt to sing to and more videos to enjoy. This particular selection revives a wide range of classic 80s tunes from Bowie to Bananarama, from Kim Wilde to Kajagoogoo, no-one who wants a dose of 80s nostalgia will be disappointed.
Obviously you need to own the mikes to sing along but it's great for parties!


The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet
The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet
by David Mitchell
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Work of Fiction, 17 May 2010
It may be hard to believe after but as an author David Mitchell seems to get better and better. This novel is written with such precision and purpose, such a poetic ear for the nuances of language, that it is a remarkable feat of writing.

On the surface, it is a historical novel. The protagonist Jacob de Zoet, a clerk newly arrived on the Dutch colony of Dejima on the shore of Nagasaki. His duty is to investigate the corruption and cheating that spoil the profits of the Dutch East India Company. Yet he receives a mixed welcome from self-interested traders, a grumpy doctor and is kept at a distance by the local Japanese community who fear the spread of alien ideas and beliefs. Stubbornly, de Zoet holds on to his family Psalter and his sense of duty, yet like any young man ,he is distracted by a woman, by Orito Aibagawa a midwife with a burnt face. Unable to control his desires, he does not realise the extent to which his actions are spied upon.

Throughout the book, Mitchell conjures up the sense of claustrophobia felt in confined communites. Whether he is describing the lives of the Dutch residents of Dejima, the suffocating House of Sisters to which Orito is banished or the cramped conditions upon a British frigate, he excels at evoking the tensions boiling under a community confined by a particular set of circumstances and at describing the brutal means through which order is kept. The book opens with an account of a miraculous birth and sustains a physical intensity throughout.

Yet Mitchell is also a master of the impressionistic detailing of emotions. At times, mimicking the simplicity of the haiku to develop associations between the natural world and the experiences of the characters. Carefully constructed paragraphs cry out to be read and read again to explore how Mitchell combines sound and meaning. Passages of this book question the physical reality of the world. Dialogue is sparky and witty. Each character has a strong and clear voice and Mitchell explores how communication is gradually established and developed between speakers of many languages.

In this amazing novel, Mitchell has produced a work which seems to draw upon the strongest features of contemporary British and Japanese writing in a novel that is intense and mesmorising.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 19, 2010 5:59 PM BST


Fun Inc.: Why games are the 21st Century's most serious business
Fun Inc.: Why games are the 21st Century's most serious business
by Tom Chatfield
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Fun inc, 1 May 2010
As someone who is guilty of accepting stereotypes of video games and gamesplayers, this book was a real eye-opener. Tom Chatfield explores the development and growing influence on all levels of society, looking at the global impact of the games industry. Chatfield points out the huge investment needed to develop games, the skills and dedication needed to succeed in major Internet games and how games are being increasingly used as educational tools. His argument is backed up with plenty of details and examples which are described in detail.
The book is well written, particularly for those who are not particularly IT-literate and I found it very informative.


Apathy for the Devil
Apathy for the Devil
by Nick Kent
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eyewitness account of 1970s Rock, 24 April 2010
This review is from: Apathy for the Devil (Paperback)
At the start of the 1970s Nick Kent arrived in London to become a music journalist. Over the next few years he dated Chrissie Hynde, partied with Led Zeppelin and The Rolling Stones, pursued David Bowie, had his life saved by Iggy Pop and joined the Sex Pistols for a short while. Yet by the end of the decade, Kent was hopelessly addicted to drugs and disillusioned with the music scene and music journalist. Apathy for the Devil is the story of Nick Kent's unique experience of the 1970s.
It is a fascinating and moving story as Kent moves from the extremes of lavish Hollywood parties to surviving in horrific conditions. It is written with little self-criticism, little sense that Kent is intending his work as a warning to others. At times his profiles of the figures he meets are colourful and enlightening and he conveys a vivid sense of the hedonistic lifestyle of the rock scene of the 1970s that few of his subjects emerged from intact.
At times, I can't help but wonder how reliable a narrator Kent is, how much his memories may have been coloured by his experiences but in a way this only helps to make the book all the more intriguing. At the end he lists a personal selection of favoured tracks from the 1970s and this tempted me to listen to music from that decade again and helps to bring his memories and experiences to life.


The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest (Millennium Trilogy Book 3)
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest (Millennium Trilogy Book 3)
by Stieg Larsson
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating end to Great Trilogy, 21 April 2010
Stieg Larsson's trilogy of thrillers comes to a conclusion with this most original conclusion. Original as for most of the novel, the unconventional heroine Lisbeth Salander is confined to a hospital bed uncertain whether her future lies in an asylum or in a prison. However crusading journalist Mikael Blomkvist is determined to help his former friend even if it means investigating a top secret division of Sweden's secret police.

As in the former novel, Larsson manages to develop his story through the detailed and careful construction of the text. In comparisons with other books in this genre, the pace is slow and at over 700 pages, it is lengthy but rewarding at the end as all the pieces in the elaborately constructed jigsaw fall into place in that most cinematic of settings, the trial scene.

Salander herself is one of the most intriguing and exasperating heroines to emerge in recent years. Her talents as a hack, her reserved nature and colourful appearance allow her to stand out from other characters and to admire how Larsson develops the nature of the other figures who move in and out of her world.

The book is ideal holiday reading- completely absorbing, fascinating and very difficult to put down.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-18