Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for Wyrdwell > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Wyrdwell
Top Reviewer Ranking: 34,425
Helpful Votes: 134

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Wyrdwell (Bonnie Scotland)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8
pixel
Steampunk Fairy Tales
Steampunk Fairy Tales
Price: £0.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 19 May 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Fun, varied and very cool.


Beak Open, Feet Relaxed: 108 Haiku
Beak Open, Feet Relaxed: 108 Haiku
by Priscilla A Lignori
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.39

5.0 out of 5 stars If you don't 'get' haiku, get this book., 19 May 2016
This book transformed my understanding of the form and underscores why the 5-7-5 haiku form is so valid and so necessary in a world dominated by Shintai 'free verse' brief poetry. Here you'll see the balancing of juxtaposing elements, irony, wisdom, the teachings of nature to the eyes of a poet who is also a spiritual practitioner. The introduction by Clark Strand is also especially informative. Every haiku in this a gem of subtle wisdom.


Into the Wild Wood: Erotic Feminist Fairy Tales
Into the Wild Wood: Erotic Feminist Fairy Tales
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pure Magic, 14 Dec. 2015
Here we have a feminist, and lesbian, metamorphoses of well, and lesser-known folk tales. What makes these lyrical, dark, tales especially compelling is not so much their erotic content (which infuse these stories with the darkly sensual) but tales which are designed to go for the mind as much as the body. Deeply political in the feminist sense, where every female character has agency and power not seen in the originals of these tales. In this the author has pulled off something remarkable: you believe by the end of these stories that they are the original tales, and the versions we know are the reimagined ones watered down by patriarchy. In places these stories have flashes of genius. I’m giving this four stars because I think, especially with the version of Snow White, there could have been a greater discussion of power, and I felt there was just a wee bit too much trust between the two main characters. But as for the rest, they’re wonderful. If you love the dark and mythic, go for these tales that oscillate between the grim, and the beautiful. The collection concludes with an original faery tale that makes you want to go and search for the source...only to find that it's come from Hill's amazing imagination. Pure magic.


Papa's Portrait: An 1820 Stephenson House Short Story
Papa's Portrait: An 1820 Stephenson House Short Story
Price: £0.99

3.0 out of 5 stars A rich historical read., 11 Nov. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a fascinating historical short story, clearly the heir to a rich tradition. Andersen carefully crafts her world and her characters and brings them vividly to life. I have some complaint about way this story has been formatted (lack of indented paragraphs annoy me) and to my mind this story really wants to be a full-blown novel to really do the characters justice. Nevertheless, this is probably the sign of a well-written short: it leaves the reader asking for more. This would get a 3.5 on the Wyrdwell scale, but since Amazon doesn't allow half-stars it will have to be a three. All in all a very enjoyable read, rich in historical detailing and language, written by someone who knows the period intimately. Great stuff.


A is for Adverb: An Alphabet for Authors in Agony
A is for Adverb: An Alphabet for Authors in Agony
Price: £1.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Lighthearted Writer's Reference., 10 Nov. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A lovely lighthearted writer's reference which uses humour to teach about the craft of writing. While old hands might not find this especially illuminating, whether you're a beginner writer or an experienced one you'll find Smyth's witty observations, and humour drier than Gandhi's flip-flop, a really good laugh. Filled with in-jokes for those in The Profession, I laughed out loud in many places. A great little read.


Father McGargles: ( Irish Comedy ) - Father Brennan Series
Father McGargles: ( Irish Comedy ) - Father Brennan Series
Price: £2.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Irish Skullduggery and ... Fly Fishing?, 4 Nov. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Coming in at 3.5 on the Wyrdwell Scale (why doesn't Amazon do half-stars?) this delightfully warm Irish tale blends the moods of Father Ted with witty observations of Roddy Doyle and Dave Allen. For me, this borders on the sort of parody of Catholicism and indeed conservative Ireland which border on the same-ole, same-ole verging in one or two places — but only one or two—on stereotype. In addition the book — an independent title — could have been better presented in terms of the cover and formatting. Nevertheless, there were many places where I guffawed with laughter, tears streaming down my cheeks in rivers of Celtic glee. Morrow draws brilliantly on larger-than-life characters, injecting dark Irish humour wherever you turn, and and I certainly won’t look at fly fishing the same way ever again. Definitely looking for more from this author. A great piece of Irish skullduggery.


Lessons in Obedience
Lessons in Obedience
Price: £0.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Sensual, visual, but falls short on plot and characterisation., 1 Nov. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Alex Morgenstern -- sadistic dominant and translator of ancient erotic texts -- takes shameless advantage by blackmailing a nineteen year old virgin into serving him naked, but he's the best of a bad bunch, apparently, especially compared with the evil Mrs Ackworth, the heroine's employer who relentlessly preys upon her waitresses, who somehow never leave her employment. "Lucy Golden" -- the heroine who shares her name with the author -- is an innocent little muppet right out of the Lolita mould, who after falling for the nefarious Mr Morgenstern (the Morning Star, no less, and therefore the perfect Lucifer in his patient corruption of a Nigh-Eve's innocence). As the novel progresses the hapless Lucy is led through some pretty nasty scenes, nothing on the level of Reage or de Sade but certainly on the SM spectrum. The heroine never seems to mind all that much having a wide open and a (problematically) child-like trust in all her masters. I would place this piece firmly in the area of dubious consent because of the level of blackmail and coercive control presented especially at the start, but for those who know what to look for there are subtle signals throughout the work the arrangement is fully consensual and the submissive knows exactly what’s happening and what she’s getting into. Even so, my hair curls slightly at some of the actions — and ethics — of the dominant parties in this piece.

What sets this writing apart is the quality of the erotic writing. I can well believe much of the intimate interactions are indeed biographical, as is the subtle, snarky, horrible sense of humour of the male first person narrator. The piece is clearly written to entice and please a straight dominant, and yes, sadistic,man. Physical scenes are lavishly depicted with high emphasis on visuals, and are therefore at the pornographic of the erotica-porn spectrum but still with the lush brush of the pen for those who prefer to read rather than watch. It has an air of classicism about Ms Golden’s writing. If I were to judge this piece purely on the concerns of what most readers will be looking for, it would receive a five-star rating, but as is usual, I'm having to dock stars for plot and most significantly in this case, the characterisation of the female protagonist. This piece is not office-girl doormat-sub smut. It has aims of literary fiction, and it crafted as such. And so for something that isn't office-girl smut, I can't let the author off the hook.

The plot doesn't work well set in the modern era. You couldn’t do as an employer what Mrs A does -- sexually coerce her employees -- and not be exposed, even in the days before internet and smart phones. But set this piece in the 1930s or earlier, and you'd have a more believable dynamic. This piece should have been set between the Wars. Since where the dominant man speaks in 19th Century English (a sin, I note, plaguing most D/S erotica), it would have made his dialogue much more credible as well. However the main issue was the heroine's characterisation.

The problem with the characterisation is there isn’t any.The heroine is not merely objectified, but an object. She has no real wit or intelligence or agency (and yes, you can have wit and intelligence at nineteen, those gifts are not age-dependent). And actually, I cannot believe that the plot is therefore in anyway related to autobiography. Nor is the heroine an author avatar, since the author is clearly much smarter than the girl as she’s portrayed in this work. I can see the appeal of course-- the perfect gorgeous compliant blank-slate submissive a man (or a woman as we can see here as well) may kink at will without regards to discussing her limits, her preference or her own tastes. For this reason the attempt here — rarely seen — to portray a sadomasochistic switch and true submissive falls flat. "Lucy" is a glove-puppet who is whatever "Alex" wants her to be. She's also much younger than nineteen, emotionally and mentally, even for a piece clearly set in the 80s or 90s before the advent of the internet. A significant issue for me, but possibly not for others. The sadistic narrator's sense of humour, so darkly and brilliantly drawn, I think would perhaps have been better rendered next to an older, more experienced female lead, one with bit of snark and fight in her. With a personality, in fact.

As it stands, I suspect this piece is a love letter. As such it probably does very well as a piece of private, theatrical eros written by a very smart literary artist performing for her lover, but because of that it falls down on the criteria for literary fiction. If this be erotic literary fiction, BOTH the concerns of Eros and the concerns of literature must be met. A very reluctant three stars, then. With less of a doormat lolita, with a more believable plot and setting, we might be looking at one of the great erotic classics of the English language.


Kushiel's Dart (Kushiel's Legacy Book 1)
Kushiel's Dart (Kushiel's Legacy Book 1)
Price: £5.69

3.0 out of 5 stars Special Snowflakes and Rapey Saxons...but still a good read., 16 Sept. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is the first in a series of epic ‘alternative Europe’ fastasy narrated by a Courtesan-cum-spy chosen by the god/angel Kushiel to be his Special Snowflake—a woman born to experience pain and pleasure as one. The world is set with Game of Thrones style political intrigue with a deeply sensuous, albeit sadomasochist erotic themes. For me this work was a tremendous feet of the imagination and the author clearly has a flair for intrigue. The work was let down by poor choices with the point of view: opting for first person narration meant that wars, battles and other events needed to be ‘reported back’ in dialogue to the main character, losing much of the epic excitemet needed for this work. Central political conflicts were not brought out early enough — if any novel needed a prologue in the third person pointing to the overarching conflict, it was this one, because the first sixteen chapters concerned the heroine’s geisha-style courtesan training. I was also disappointed to see that this book is also a thinly disguised ‘Chosen One’ epic. I'd have preferred it if the main character was one of a few, not the only one, because I was getting a bit tired of her Special Snowflake status by the end. The main antagonist was brilliantly realised, though, and made up for this.

While not pornographic, the BDSM themes of this work are unambiguous, the protagonist is clearly a submissive masochist, and the only submissive masochist in the whole world, despite that world being populated by lots and lots of dominant sadists and rapey Saxons who have to make do with courtesans merely trained to perform that role. I had no idea that it was possible to make a Mary Sue out of a sex worker, but apparently you can. Nevertheless, I loved the poetry and sensuality of the language, the fact that heroine is presented as tough with an absence of doormatlitude, and there’s sufficient merit in this book to make me want to read on.


Debt Inheritance (Indebted Book 1)
Debt Inheritance (Indebted Book 1)
Price: £0.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Okay. What the heck did I just read?, 26 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Well, I know what I just read. I read sadomasochistic non-con erotica with near-direct lifts in tone, phrasing and general plotlines from the Marquis de Sade, the Story of O, and Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty. Thus the parts of this that were good were not original, and the parts which were original were not good. On the plus side for an indie book the writing was at a decent level and the book was slick, well-edited and well presented. Nila, a complete doormat of a protagonist is helplessly dragged to the nefarious clutches of the Hawk family. She’s betrayed, manhandled, drugged, debased, verbally and physically abused and yet somehow they let her keep her mobile phone to sext some unknown guy rather than, oh I don’t know, call the cops and the newspapers? We remain as clueless as we were at the start as to the nature of the reasons for the debts that needed settled, other than a wafer thin plot about Queen Elizabeth I making it all legal, as if such a contract could be enforced even during her reign.The cellphone was the most incredulous part of the plot along side the size of the leading man’s member, which apparently was so big she couldn’t get her hands around it. Seriously? So did she have abnormally small hands? And apparently feminine anatomy designed by Nature to birth a baby cannot accommodate him? The female character had no fight in her, no agency, no intelligence, and no sense of self-preservation. In order to pull off a plot like this successfully, there needs to be more of a reveal, and more of a plot to begin with. I was continually yanked out of the world into my own, where I was experiencing WTFs at the rate of three per page.


Werewolf in hiding: A Dana Carlton Novella
Werewolf in hiding: A Dana Carlton Novella
Price: £1.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Great debut with a couple of wobbles, 26 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Dana Carlton is a black witch minding her own business in a remote location when a private security firm run by her estranged foists a werewolf on the run onto her. Dana is torn between her attraction to the wolf and her pressing need to be left alone to curse people for money. Everything changes when Dana realises that the people looking for Mr Wolf have another witch in tow — one she knows well. Black paints a deliciously original urban fantasy heroine: one who is morally grey, with a dark and irreconcilable past. This novella is the opener to what looks to be a promising saga of a powerful woman coming to terms with her own darkness. I really enjoyed this story, finding it refreshing and original. Here and there I found some wobbles in phrasing. I’m not keen on some of the heroine’s internal reflections on “Mr Hunk” werewolf, but that’s really more a stylistic consideration. I also felt the book could have been longer. However, it is a series so it will be interesting to see how it develops. Black has a knack for dark fantasy, and I’m looking forward to seeing how this series evolves.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8