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Jocko (Cambridgeshire)

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English Tableware Co. Artisan Hare Toughened Glass Worktop Saver, 40 x 30cm
English Tableware Co. Artisan Hare Toughened Glass Worktop Saver, 40 x 30cm

5.0 out of 5 stars Warmly Recommended, 5 Sept. 2017
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This item was part of a gift - along with other ET items. The recipient was absolutely delighted and has the highest praise for their quality and design.


Ghosts of the Broads
Ghosts of the Broads
by Charles Sampson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars There's a word they have in Norfolk...., 21 Dec. 2016
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This review is from: Ghosts of the Broads (Paperback)
"Ghosts of the Broads" was originally issued by the Yachtsman Publishing Company in 1931. Its author was a well-known Harley Street medic and regular visitor to the waterways of Norfolk. The stories are fictitious, their supposed sources invented and the book itself intended as an entertaining romp.

The 1970s Jarrold reprint - reissued several times - does not make this clear. Its contents have thus been uncritically accepted by "story tellers" and "ghost hunters" as accounts of real experiences and traditions. Given their absurdity, this staggers the soul. Sampson - to put it kindly - was not exactly M.R. James....

Of very minor interest as local literature, "Ghosts of the Broads", in the fine Norfolk phrase, is otherwise absolute Squit.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 27, 2017 9:55 PM BST


Your Affectionate and Loving Sister: The Correspondence of Barbara Kerrich and Elizabeth Postlethwaite, 1733-1751
Your Affectionate and Loving Sister: The Correspondence of Barbara Kerrich and Elizabeth Postlethwaite, 1733-1751
by Barbara Kerrich
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars You'll love them too!, 21 Dec. 2016
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Enormously enjoyable and completely fascinating - my only regret is that all the correspondence was not reproduced, although the editor has done a excellent job of selection and elucidation. I would recommend the reader also seek out R.W. Ketton-Cremer’s, "Country Neighbourhood" (Faber, 1951) - easily found here and elsewhere on-line for a few pounds. This consists of the contemporary letters of the Rev. Patrick St. Clair to Ashe Windham. Together the books provide a wonderful personal portrait of early 18th century Norfolk.


Norfolk Airfields in the Second World War
Norfolk Airfields in the Second World War
by Graham Smith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.95

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Introduction, 4 Oct. 2016
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This book is aimed at general readers with an interest in wartime Norfolk. It is enthusiastically written but inevitably - given the scope of the subject - somewhat superficial and misses out some particularly interesting airfields - for example RAF Barton Bendish, which has been the subject of some fascinating research. The emphasis is on air operations rather than the fields themselves. Readers with any background knowledge of the subject or a particular interest in a given airfield are much better served by more specialist works.


No Title Available

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far ahead of the pack, 29 Aug. 2015
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Early days yet, but this appears by far the best "Apple" charger I have purchased in the last 8 years - and I have had too many, including badly flawed official Apple products! The quality is extremely high, it functions perfectly and came with a veritable box of goodies - a keyboard mat, car usb adaptor and other trinkets. I think this is a genuinely good buy amid a field full of often terrible alternatives.


No Title Available

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A pal in your pocket, 7 Jun. 2015
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A very present help in time of trouble :) I have found these salts of the greatest assistance in dealing with sinus problems and related anxiety and instability. When you need a clear head, these are your friend :)


The Unmasking Of Oscar Wilde
The Unmasking Of Oscar Wilde
Price: £11.19

3.0 out of 5 stars Not Too Wilde About It., 4 Jun. 2015
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I so wish I liked this book more. There are an extraordinary number of bad books about Oscar Wilde, inevitably offering a single line solution to the enigma of this remarkable man. Anyone who has actually read Wilde's works - and I am sure that many of his biographers have not, although Pearce is a very honourable exception - will know that religion played an enormous part in his life. This is routinely ignored by modern biographers, which makes this book all the more important - and disappointing.

Wilde - like his friend Frank Harris - had a profound fascination with the personality of Christ. This was not some casual interest, and his ideas cry out for exploration. Pearce - I think correctly - sees through the masks and mirages modern writers latch onto - the supposed feminism, radicalism, Irish nationalism, syphilis, even homosexuality in the "gay icon" sense. But I felt he never engaged with the underlying Wilde, although making a gallant attempt. Instead we get a rather pallid biography in which the good people are Catholics, the bad people are not and the tone is that of an appalled maiden aunt. This is not without interest. It makes a change to see John Grey and Marc-André Raffalovich depicted as positive figures - but of course they were converts. Even Robbie Ross and Alfred Douglas get an easy ride - but of course they... you guessed it. Incidentally, I have never seen any of Wilde's biographers mention that Ross became a militant atheist, precisely in the Marquis of Queensbury mould, as soon as Catholicism became respectable. The poseur of the pair was not Wilde.

The real problem for me was that Pearce seems to have absolutely no sense of humour. There is never a suggestion that he understands Wilde's irony or Zen-like use of paradox. He takes him at face value as a Very Wicked Man, who might have been a Very Good Man had he only been a Catholic earlier. I have a feeling that deep in his heart, our author would like Wilde to have become Hilaire Belloc. Actually, had he not met Alfred Douglas, I rather think something like that would have happened. One can imagine him living into the '40s, and a fascinating thought it is, but Wilde's significance lies in his terrible mistakes. His flawed, complex humanity is what moves us.

Someone needs to write a book about Oscar Wilde and Jesus. Mr Pearce is quite obviously a Very Good Man of intense faith. I have nothing but admiration for him, but this book is not that book.


The Norfolk Landscape
The Norfolk Landscape
by David Dymond
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Far From Flat, 12 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: The Norfolk Landscape (Paperback)
One never knows quite what one is going to get from a book like this: A nostalgic evocation of the ruddy squire and ploughman or an earnest discourse on alluvial sludge. David Dymond gives us infinitely more.

This is an extraordinary book. Chapter by chapter we move through history, watching the development of the Norfolk landscape as human beings shape it. Without any rosy, dewy-eyed nonsense, one does indeed grow aware of how detached from nature the industrial age has become. One line will always live with me, and is all the more powerful for being in the middle of an entirely neutral discussion: ""The thirteenth century... countryside was used intensively, and with an ecological sensitivity that makes twentieth century farming look like open-cast mining". But that is only a peripheral theme.

To simply list the contents would be pointless. As someone with an almost obsessive attachment to the history and topography of a few obscure patches, I frequently found myself thinking "well, he won't mention that". At which point, of course, "he" immediately did, telling me things I could never have known. This is an amazingly comprehensive, delightfully written book that will immeasurably enrich your feeling for and understanding of the Norfolk landscape. And I'll never look on Castle Acre in quite the same light again! If you love Norfolk, you'll love this. Buy it without a moments hesitation.


ChapBooks of the Eighteenth Century
ChapBooks of the Eighteenth Century
by John Ashton
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cobbler's New Translation, 5 Feb. 2015
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The reviewer above has stated things perfectly, but there are a couple of things I would like to add.

Firstly, this book was originally published in 1882, and most of the chapbook texts are edited or summarised - very well, too. As the first book on the subject, this was clearly a labour of love. Far from the detached objectivity of modern editors, Ashton treats the texts as living things. Whilst he excludes ribald material in deference to 19th century mores, he poignantly defends such themes: "In reading these books we must not, however, look upon them from our present point of view. Whether men and women are better now than they used to be, is a moot point, but things used to be spoken of openly, which are now never whispered, and no harm was done or offence taken; so the broad humour of the jest-books was, after all, only exuberant fun". Today we have our own - I think more malignant - brand of ahistorical prudery, making his words even more valid. And those oddly placed commas show how much the chapbook style had entered into Ashton's soul. They could have no better editor.

Frankly, whatever you pay for this book is cheap for the illustrations alone. These numberless and heart-breakingly innocent little pictures are indescribably wonderful. And it makes you think to realise that as Captain Cook landed in Australia, Tom Paine preached revolution and Watt stoked his engine, people sat by cottage fires marvelling at the tales of Sir John Mandeville and the story of Jack the Giant Killer.

As literature these little little books may not be up to much. As pure imagination they are perfect. Marvellous, magical stuff :)


Christopher Saxton's 16th Century Maps
Christopher Saxton's 16th Century Maps
by Christopher Saxton
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This England, 5 Feb. 2015
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More than 40 years ago, when I was a boy, I fell in love with the reproductions of Saxton's maps sold by the British Museum. That sparked a life-long fascination with historical cartography.

How I would have loved this book, and how I love it now! This is a gorgeously reproduced, slightly reduced facsimile of Saxton's astonishing atlas - including the title pages and index, which are seldom seen. The introduction by Professor Ravenhill is charmingly written, comprehensive and superbly well-informed. There is little more one can say: This is is simply a book every lover of maps and of Shakespeare's England will delight in.

I am particularly impressed by the production - and above all that real care seems to have been taken to minimise loss of image at the centreline. Given the secondhand price, this book is simply wonderful value and a pure joy for cartophiles :)


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