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Sarah Joanne (Oxford, UK)

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Harry Potter and The Cursed Child - Parts One and Two: The Official Script Book of the Original West End Production (Special Rehearsal Edition)
Harry Potter and The Cursed Child - Parts One and Two: The Official Script Book of the Original West End Production (Special Rehearsal Edition)
by J.K. Rowling
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.00

23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Badly written, cliched and cringe-worthy at times., 18 Aug. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This play is so badly written I was actually reading bits aloud for my friend to laugh at while we were on holiday together. The characters speak in corny movie cliches or banalities (Harry (on Voldemort): "He'd only have got more powerful - the darkness would only have got darker" ...okay, thanks for that thrilling insight, Harry...) and the plot is strained and full of holes, getting its only momentum (and a pretty sluggish one at that!) from the continual re-hashing of the original Harry Potter books. The villain is obvious from the moment they are introduced to the story because there is no effort made to integrate her properly into the story or the wizarding world. The threat of Voldemort's return lacked any real suspense or fear, unlike the original books where his appearances were always frightening.
The various problems facing the characters are solved with no effort whatsoever: for instance, Albus Potter whips up Polyjuice potion in about five minutes - what a contrast to the laborious process Harry, Ron and Hermione go through to make the same potion in Chamber of Secrets. The protagonists' invasion of the Ministry of Magic is similarly flat and fake with no explanation.
The characters from the original books seem to have changed their natures somewhat - Harry is un-empathetic, autocratic and rude, Hermione apparently needs a man in order to become Minister for Magic (without Ron she ends up as a bitter Hogwarts professor, nice blow for feminism there!) and Ron is a cringe-worthy parody of his former self; even more disappointing is Snape, who has lost his acerbic sarcasm and become a sappy sentimentalist: there is no way the Snape of the books would utter the words "Tell Albus Severus I'm proud he bears my name" about any son of Harry's.
I wouldn't bother wasting any time on this book - it seems to be nothing more than a crude attempt to milk even more money out of Harry Potter fans.


The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying: A simple, effective way to banish clutter forever
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying: A simple, effective way to banish clutter forever
Price: £6.99

5.0 out of 5 stars unique and inspiring, it will change your life!, 7 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I really enjoyed reading this book and am half way through applying her method to my home. It is incredibly empowering to use her technique of discarding based on whether an item "sparks joy" and already my home is making me smile more as the spaces become less cluttered and my drawers better organized. I did clothes first and my drawers are still beautiful after almost a month, with no re-organising from me!
Some readers may find her tendency to personify inanimate objects with human emotion off putting, I found it endearing although I would be embarrassed to stand in the hall and thank my house out loud!
I would heartily recommend this book to anyone struggling with curating their home,
with clutter or with keeping on top of tidying.


Simple Times: Crafts for Poor People
Simple Times: Crafts for Poor People
by Amy Sedaris
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Funny but useless, 5 May 2011
This book should be labeled as a joke book - it is a parody of a craft book and as someone who bought it for real craft inspiration, that was pretty useless. However it is witty and the pictures and text are beautifully done. Amy Sedaris' musings are very clever and some of the faux craft "ideas" are very funny indeed. Perhaps a nice humorous coffee table book for someone, but not a good gift for someone who actually wants to do crafts!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 13, 2011 11:31 PM BST


Luella's Guide to English Style
Luella's Guide to English Style
by Luella Bartley
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading and pointless, 5 May 2011
This book is entitled "Luella's guide to English Style", but is not in fact a guide to English style at all; rather it is a stream-of-consciousness account of the author's thoughts on English fashion and style. If I had known that this "guide" would in fact consist of ridiculous stereotypes about fashion based on age and social class, I wouldn't have bothered. I advise you not to either.


Knife: Book 1
Knife: Book 1
by R J Anderson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Knife, 9 Jan. 2009
This review is from: Knife: Book 1 (Paperback)
I picked up Knife on impulse in the city of Bath last week - I wish I lived in Bath so I could go back and kiss the bookseller. It is one of the best modern children's books I have read in a long time.
The protagonist Knife (Bryony) is an immediately attractive character, whose individuality and personal strength have the reader rooting for her from the very beginning. The other characters in the Faery Oak tree are well drawn and believable, and the reader really gets a sense of the small community with all its various personalities and prejudices. The story combines traditional ideas of Faery with a modern twist - through the interaction of the rebel, Knife, with the human boy Paul it offers a unique view of humanity seen through the eyes of a race which live apart from humans and yet on their doorstep, and shows the damage that fear and misinformation can cause. The culture clash between Knife and Paul despite their obvious affinity for each other is intriguing, and leads well into the mystery created around the 'sundering' of the Oak tree where the faeries live from the rest of the world. The story also offers an imaginative view of the human creative process, containing as it does both inset stories and artworks. Above all, this book is well written, enthralling and incredibly imaginative and I couldn't put it down. Fantastic - more please!


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