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Benison (UK)

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50 FUCHSIA PINK C6 Premium Envelopes 100gsm 114mm x 162mm FREE POST
50 FUCHSIA PINK C6 Premium Envelopes 100gsm 114mm x 162mm FREE POST
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 27 April 2015
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Lovely, reasonably priced envelopes delivered quickly. Thank you.


To A Strange Somewhere Fled
To A Strange Somewhere Fled
by DM Denton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.00

5.0 out of 5 stars A beautifully realised sequel: beguiling and believable, 10 Mar. 2015
I was privileged to have a pre-publication review copy.

To open the pages of a historical novel written by D.M. Denton is to find that the past is no longer a foreign country. In this beautifully realised sequel to A House Near Luccoli, the author once again effortlessly blends the vividly imagined fictional character Donatella with real-life historical figures and settings to create a world that is as beguiling as it is believable.

We are invited to follow Donatella’s progress as she faces a very different future from the one she had begun to imagine for herself – without the quixotic musical genius, the 17th century Italian composer, Alessandro Stradella, who reawakened her passions and zest for life.

This is a subtle, understated exploration of love and lost possibility and there are no easy answers or conventional happy endings. As Albert Schweitzer wrote, ‘In everyone’s life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being’. There can be no better description of Donatella’s encounter with Stradella in A House Near Luccoli – but now living in England, and haunted by vivid memories of her time with him in Italy, what can life hold for her?

Donatella, her heart awoken and then broken, remains ‘another man’s secret’. She can perhaps reveal herself again, but surrender has many guises.

Scrupulously researched and historically accurate, the novel immerses the reader in its historical period. That we can meet Purcell within these pages and find him totally believable as a living, breathing human being is a mark of the author’s imaginative powers and literary skill. There are, appropriately enough, no false notes to be found.


The Library Next Door
The Library Next Door
Price: £1.45

5.0 out of 5 stars Don't miss this visit to the library next door..., 10 Feb. 2014
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If you are not yet familiar with DM Denton's work, this short story is a wonderful introduction to it. It is a hallmark of the author's writing that she is able to rapidly set a scene and bring characters to life with great skill and authenticity, immediately involving the reader in the lives of her protagonists. In this involving story, a young woman gradually gains the courage to be herself through reading books from the library of the title, and -- both literally and metaphorically -- writing herself into a new and autonomous selfhood: '...to make a beginning all her own'.


The Snow White Gift
The Snow White Gift
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Wise and heartwarming, 4 Dec. 2013
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This short story is a wise and heartwarming tale. The reader is quickly drawn into the lives of Maudy, Aunt Nanny and Maudy's neice, the 'sweet child' whose reaction to a special Christmas gift comes back to haunt her in later life. It's a story of unconditional love, forbearance, redemption and forgiveness. A perfect Christmas read for any time of year. Don't miss!


A Friendship with Flowers
A Friendship with Flowers
by Dm Denton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £23.45

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book, 22 April 2013
In A Friendship with Flowers, the gifted American author and artist Diane Denton invites us to share a healing journey she took when the flowers that surrounded her in a very English part of England gave her solace, hope and inspiration. This beautifully produced book will not be left on a bookshelf for long; and as if the exquisite paintings (you'll never look at a dandelion in the same way again) are not more than enough in themselves, the author also includes her unique commentary on the natural world as she studies and interacts with it while coming to terms with an unspecified experience in her life.

This combination of artwork and poetic observation, that is both personal and universal, creates a unique alchemy that calms and comforts while still leaving open the essential mystery of the natural world and our place in it.

Sometimes, the author seems to suggest, it's OK for there to be no answers; there may be no pat solutions, but there are insights and realisations, looking back to move forward (This holy rose/is another reminder/of the summer past/and yet/to come...), and new ways of seeing things (I found the snow didn't drop/from above/but sprung from below/to cover the ground...).

The illustrations and the accompanying poetry, which is controlled, understated and pared back, combine to create a companion book that will reveal a little more each time you dip into it; you will feel (to borrow the author's words): here's a friend/I just got to know -- /suddenly,/by the roadside,/as I was going/nowhere.

This book also includes a detailed glossary listing all the flowers shown in the beautiful illustrations throughout the book. This glossary includes the everyday and Latin name of each flower plus brief information about its habitat and the time of year that you'll be able to spot it (easily recognisable in real life from the painstaking accuracy of the artist's depiction).


A House Near Luccoli
A House Near Luccoli
Price: £4.58

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautifully written historical novel, 7 Sept. 2012
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From the opening lines, this beautifully written historical novel effortlessly transports the reader into the very real world of the `forgotten' 17th century composer, Stradella, and his relationship with the vividly imagined fictional protagonist, Donatella.

In turns moving and exhilarating, sad and joyous, the author moves dexterously from scene to scene: from exquisitely rendered intimate and searching conversations between Stradella and Donatella to the pace and excitement of the final scenes at the Carnevale, leading to a dénouement that is both an ending and a beginning. The novel has no longueurs or loss of pace; its skilfully constructed momentum makes for a compelling read.

Accurately rendered historical details (the novelist's light touch belies the in-depth research that she must have undertaken) and convincing characterisation and plot development lie at the heart of this fascinating and rewarding novel. And as with any skilled writer and artist, the author provides insights not only into a long-neglected musician and the specific time in which he lived, but also addresses questions that are as relevant today: what it is to be gifted and what it is to be ordinary, and the hopes, disappointments, griefs, yearnings and joys that are the markers of what it is to be human.

This novel would make a great film! I hope the author receives the recognition she deserves for this impressive achievement and I sincerely hope she continues to write.


Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
by Sue Hamilton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.99

11 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Have the words 'accessible' and 'lucid' been redefined? I must have missed that meeting..., 2 Mar. 2008
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Richard Gombrich of Oxford University describes this book as 'lucid' and Damien Keown of London University describes it as 'accessible'.

Really? By page two I am reading (or should that be 'trying to navigate') a 96-word sentence, complete with parentheses, two semicolons and two uses of the phrase 'and/or'.

By page three, I am reading:

"We also know that at least part of what is not-God is both plural (all the individual souls)and everlasting. Less abstractly, this last point tells us something important about the nature of human beings, in themselves a part of reality that might be comprised in any of a number of ways. And in addition to this, we know that some kind of system of causation links present behaviour to an unknown future mode of existence."

I'm afraid that beginning a sentence with the words "Less abstractedly" does not render what follows less abstract.

Overall, a disappointing book that definitely doesn't do what it says on the tin. I gave up and my largely unread copy is now for sale on Amazon Marketplace. I don't recommend it to you.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 6, 2008 5:49 PM BST


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