Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for Nick Brett > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Nick Brett
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,159
Helpful Votes: 6365

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Nick Brett (Wiltshire, England)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Kings of the Wyld: The Band, Book One
Kings of the Wyld: The Band, Book One
by Nicholas Eames
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy romp, 23 May 2017
I started off a little frustrated as it felt too clever by half and I felt the ‘clever’ references to rock music were detracting from the story and the characters. But then I suddenly tuned in (hey, a musical reference) and the characters started to come alive and the daft romp became quite good fun. The author is having great fun and gently taking the micky out of fantasy heroics and tribute bands! But eventually this kind of worked pretty well, don’t expect anything serious, roll with it and you might be pleasantly surprised.


London Falling (Shadow Police series Book 1)
London Falling (Shadow Police series Book 1)
Price: £5.69

4.0 out of 5 stars Darkness at the heart of London., 23 May 2017
A small team in London’s Metropolitan Police find themselves tuned into a dark side of London and on the trail of a witch determined to do harm. So far, so very standard Urban Fantasy with cops thrown in. But this is much darker than the usual ones and with some clever ideas and twists. The cops are out of their depth and resort to standard policework to come to terms with their new situation but they have no real idea how to deal with the occult and a new perspective on their City.
I thought it was clever and inventive, took me a little while to tune in to it but I did end up rather enjoying it. No “Rivers of London” with a light touch, this is much deeper.


Red Sister (Book of the Ancestor, Book 1)
Red Sister (Book of the Ancestor, Book 1)
by Mark Lawrence
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £10.49

3.0 out of 5 stars Caught between YA and adult, 23 May 2017
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
First I must lay my cards on the table and state that I didn’t like the original Prince of Thorns book, the writing style just didn’t work for me and I did not engage at all with the characters.
But it has been a while, authors change, develop and improve, so I thought I would give this a go.
There are been a few “girl trains as a killer” books in the fantasy genre of late, so this had some stiff competition. Firstly the writing style was different, this was an easy read and felt YA almost in the approach. Young waif is brought to a convent where the training is unconventional and, as she trains as a Red Sister, her past and her enemies are catching up with her.
The reading is almost too easy with not quite enough to differentiate it. The dialogue was a little off, at one stage these are nine year olds who are talking like adults, not kids that they clearly are. There is a bit of politics and ‘bigger picture’ but keeps being dragged back to the young girls training. I surprise myself by saying it needed more of the bite from the author’s first book and less of the Harry Potter style boarding school type adventures (with added blood and gore).
After the Prince of Thorns I was clearly never going to read another in the series, but I might just pick up the next one in this series to see where he is going with it.


The Remnants: Dead Loss
The Remnants: Dead Loss
Price: £0.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Lacking something, 19 May 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Set in a post zombie apocolypse, this is an view of a young brother and sister hiding out in their isolated farm. A trio of bikers/looters visit the farm and the horrors of the new world are brought close to home.
It's well written but it lacks a sense of anchor to grab your attention and want to read more. Do I care enought to pick up the next 'volume' - probably not and therein lies the problem. Not enough to differentiate this and make you want more.


1000 Yards - A John Milton Short Story (John Milton Series)
1000 Yards - A John Milton Short Story (John Milton Series)
Price: £0.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Introducing John Milton.., 17 May 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Operative John Milton is sent into North Korea to extract revenge for an act of cyber-terror. Very current storyline indeed.
Helped by some locals he soon finds he has attracted the attention of the authorities and needs to complete his mission before they catch up with him.
A pretty good short story and character introduction and certainly in an unusual setting, the weight of the authoritarian regime feels 'cold war' like oppresive. There is a bit about Milton having some sort of PTSS issues with bad dreams and this didn't really work for me, and didn't really flesh out the character of MIlton to make him anything other than generic.

But not bad, not bad.


Wrong Turn: A Jack Nightingale Short Story
Wrong Turn: A Jack Nightingale Short Story
Price: £0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Access all areas, 15 May 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Jack takes a wrong turn and end up in a very strange convention. And he is expected.
This is both clever and fun, less of the occult in this, but Jack dealing with the wrong kind of people at a place for the wrong kind of people. Some surprising, er, "guest stars" and a very nice twist on conventions that will feel very familiar to anyone who has been to one.
Another brilliant short story in a series that just keeps giving.


Ice Station Nautilus: A Novel
Ice Station Nautilus: A Novel
Price: £4.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars cat and mouse thrills under the ice cap, 6 May 2017
Much mention of Tom Clancy in the style of this book. I had been looking forward to reading this and I was not disappointed. And the Clancy comparisons are well founded I have to say.
This is a thriller, mainly set on (and under) the polar ice cap. A cat and mouse game between American and Russian submarines has ended in disaster, with a limited time for rescue. What should be a complex but focussed rescue operation turns into something more dangerous than could be expected. The Russians have an agenda to hide secrets and grab some of their own, the only problem is that it means leaving no survivors.
Detailed to the degree that you will feel mildly claustrophobic, this is written by a veteran who knows his stuff and can make you feel part of the action. Wear something warm as you will feel the cold too.
Like Clancy this has detailed action but also the big picture politics and “world view” supported by a plot that works and has, within the bounds of fiction, credibility.
The author needs to give his characters a little more personality so you have more empathy for them (the two main US characters are developed, but the rest needed a little more fleshing out) to give a little more balance to his technical knowledge. But this is a minor quibble as the action does flow and you really are whisked along towards that polar ice cap.
Lots here to suggest not only an enjoyable techno-thriller but the probability of lots more good stuff to come from the author.


Soldier Spy
Soldier Spy
Price: £4.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An anti-hero but interesting in parts., 30 April 2017
This review is from: Soldier Spy (Kindle Edition)
There are mixed opinions as to whether this is true or not (if it is, I am surprised he was allowed to publish it), but I have to say that much came over as authentic.
The author is an ex soldier recruited into the Intelligence Service as a "watcher". Part of a team that would follow and log the behaviour of those deemed dangerous to the UK. He covers the training and some operational stories and I hope it is true, because I would like to hope there is a bunch of talented guys and girls doing this to keep our country safe. The tradecraft and training is intensive but nothing that you wouldn't really expect. They are not "tooled up", they are information gatherers, if there is an active threat then the professionals are brought in for support.
The author eventually had to retire with stress, but he does come over as a miserable loner and a little self obsessed. He has (had) a remarkable skill set in observational skills and the ability to blend in, but you wouldn't want to work with him and it does come over that his own team didn't really trust him to do as he was ordered.
So interesting in parts and I hope there really are people out there doing this on our behalf.


House Revenge: A Joe DeMarco Thriller (Joe DeMarco Thrillers (Hardcover))
House Revenge: A Joe DeMarco Thriller (Joe DeMarco Thrillers (Hardcover))
by Mike Lawson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.54

5.0 out of 5 stars Very clever series, 30 April 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a great series of political thrillers. Joe DeMarco is a laid back “fixer” for a slightly dodgy US Congressman. He does things in the background although he would much rather be playing golf or drinking Martinis. The author creates fantastic characters and weaves them into clever plots and I have enjoyed every book in the series and would recommend them to anyone even vaguely interested in political thrillers. I would stress that these tend to be slightly smaller picture rather than big stuff, but that is why they work so well.
In this one DeMarco is sent to Boston to fob off an elderly woman who is being threatened by developers who want her to leave her apartment. The Congressman doesn’t really care, but wants to be seen to be doing something and get some positive publicity. However, when the developer disrespects him, the congressman declares all-out war and tasks DeMarco to sort the problem.
This has DeMarco taking more responsibility than usual and (sadly) not much by way of an appearance of his friend Emma but this is clever stuff with some great dialogue.


Red Platoon
Red Platoon
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Modern day Alamo, 30 April 2017
This review is from: Red Platoon (Kindle Edition)
A true story of the defence of Camp Keating in Afghanistan in 2009. The camp was in a poor defensive position at the base of a valley (Like the bottom of a toilet bowl as the author describes it) where the Taliban could see everything going on and plan the attack they eventually made.
Told by one of the US Sergeants in “Red Platoon” this is an astonishing and visceral story, there was an overwhelming attack by a significant number of insurgents and the lack of sufficient defensive planning (a leadership issue) in such an exposed position could have been the end of the camp where it not for the sheer bravery and fighting spirit of the US soldiers based there.
Where this is different is in the honest telling and the way the author exposes you to the soldiers there and you do feel as if you know them. Likewise he also tells you of their failings and tactical errors as, bit by bit they are pushed back into a central bit of the base and have to fight for their lives. The map is useful as you can plot what happened as the attack develops. The soldiers here are ordinary troops, no special forces, they vary from the lazy to the dedicated, the scared to the heroic but their backs are up against the wall. Help is a long way away and hampered by lack of fuel and weather conditions.
A powerful slice of front line conflict and the story of some very brave men.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20