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Profile for M. G. Wilson > Reviews

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M. G. Wilson (Eastbourne)
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Sweet Defeat
Sweet Defeat
Price: £13.77

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Warning!, 30 May 2011
This review is from: Sweet Defeat (Audio CD)
I loved Jon Allen's debut album. If you did too, I suggest you listen before you buy. This could be a different artist. Someone somewhere - record label? - has decided his initial approach wasn't going to shift enough units. What we have here is schlock. Tastefully produced, but schlock nonetheless. Makes Paolo Nutini seem edgy. Deeply disappointing. Deeply depressing.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 12, 2011 11:21 PM BST


X-Men Origins: Wolverine [DVD] (2009)
X-Men Origins: Wolverine [DVD] (2009)
Dvd ~ Hugh Jackman
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £2.19

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sound and fury signifying nothing, 15 Dec. 2009
X-Men 1 and 2 were the best Marvel adaptations. X-Men 3 one of the worst. Which way would this go? Well sadly, it's just dull. In fact for all the racing about, fighting, explosions, mutating and general mayhem, the only thing that sparks any real interest or empathy is the love story between Wolverine and Kayla Silverfox. And clearly the love interest is not supposed to be central to a Marvel adaptation. Sad.


Crossing the River of Fire: Mark's Gospel and Global Capitalism
Crossing the River of Fire: Mark's Gospel and Global Capitalism
by Wilf Wilde
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Empire, Global Capital and Jesus, 12 Aug. 2009
Read following the collapse of the world's banking system in 2008/9, and in conjunction with Naomi Klein's 'Shock Doctrine', Wilde's writing is ahead of its time and unusual in combining politics and religion - a great taboo in polite english society. Its strength, is ultimately also its weakness. Wilde ranges over political, social and economic history, starting from the ancient greeks, and covering not just Europe, but South America, North America, Asia and Africa. From here he moves on to scriptural exegesis and theology. So the strength is in his wide ranging analysis, the elements of which may not be original, but the synthesis of which may well be. The weakness is that such a broad sweep can be dizzying for the non-specialist reader. Some may also be put off by the left wing sympathies of the author. That would be a shame as there is considerable food for thought here, in a book that is well worth the effort of reading.


The Gum Thief
The Gum Thief
by Douglas Coupland
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent Coupland, but not exceptional, 6 Dec. 2008
This review is from: The Gum Thief (Paperback)
Decent Coupland but not exceptional, which is to say that it's still pretty good by anyone else's standards. If you know you already like Coupland, worth reading, if you don't know, this wouldn't be the place to start.


Jesus: A Portrait
Jesus: A Portrait
by Gerald O'Collins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.95

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fails to deliver, 3 Dec. 2008
This review is from: Jesus: A Portrait (Paperback)
'There are many books about Jesus. But few attempt to tell us what he was actually like.' So says the blurb. Which would make a great book. But unfortunately, this is not that book. It's not a bad book as such - it's a solid middle of the road account of who Jesus was, what he did and what he said, but such books are not uncommon. O'Collins raises interesting questions: "what must Jesus have been like if he came up with these stories?" for example. But ultimately he fails to provide any answers.


Brasyl (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
Brasyl (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
by Ian McDonald
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars In another universe this is a better book, 30 Nov. 2008
This review is from: Brasyl (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
As other reviewers have remarked the high count of Portuguese words, real and invented, makes this tough to read, but the real problem is that story is just not as gripping as it should be (or rather that all three story lines are not gripping all of the time) and that the plot twist, when it comes, at the story's resolution is highly derivative, one part Dallas and one part The Matrix. Yes it was all a dream. In fact everything is a dream. Multiverse, quantum reality, the lot.


Original Sin - A Cultural History: 1
Original Sin - A Cultural History: 1
by Alan Jacobs
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.79

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast paced, engaging and entertaining, 26 Oct. 2008
It would be natural to expect any book on original sin to be dull, worthy, depressing and difficult. Alan Jacobs has pulled off a minor miracle in writing one that is fast paced, engaging and entertaining. Jacobs, a professor of English rather than a theologian, wears his learning lightly, and as result has produced an erudite work that is accessible to the general reader. As the subtitle indicates this is not a work of theology but rather the history of an idea, its proponents and opponents. An idea that despite many difficulties and unattractive features, has enormous explanatory power in answering the question: where does evil come from? Although Jacobs does not hide his own position, he writes as a storyteller rather than propagandist.

Highly recommended.


Pontoon: A Lake Wobegon Novel (Lake Wobegon Series)
Pontoon: A Lake Wobegon Novel (Lake Wobegon Series)
by Garrison Keillor
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ordinary lives in all their extraordinariness, 16 Oct. 2008
Pontoon is a book about stepping outside of what's expected, whether those expectations come from within or from others, and about leaving home, whether to start afresh, or simply to be able to return.

In this the latest episode of the gently comic soap opera that is Lake Wobegone, Keillor presents an enjoyable cast of new characters, with cameo roles for some old friends. Keillor's great gift is as an observer of ordinary lives in all their extraordinariness, detailing small town life, warts and all, and yet with a great affection and compassion. While perhaps lacking the charm and nostalgia of earlier episodes, this is still a fine addition to the Wobegone canon, written with a sure light touch that keeps the pages turning as the stories build to their laugh out loud climax.


The Enneagram: A Private Session with the World's Greatest Psychologist
The Enneagram: A Private Session with the World's Greatest Psychologist
by Simon Parke
Edition: Paperback

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Deeply flawed, 8 Oct. 2008
This is a deeply flawed book. I can't comment on how well it represents enneagram thinking, or whether as a result I have an accurate opinion. I can say that the author presents no empirical basis for the system, that the more detailed his descriptions of the nine personality types, the less any of them seemed to fit and that had I found a type that fit, the book would have been a poor guide to what to do with that knowledge or how it might be helpful.

And that's without mentioning the author's stilted style and the irritating plot device of writing a book from the perspective of an inanimate object (imagine a book by the talking paperclip).


Don't Do Anything
Don't Do Anything
Price: £12.66

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent, textured melodic pop, 26 Sept. 2008
This review is from: Don't Do Anything (Audio CD)
Sam Phillips has always embraced change, and some change was inevitable on this her first album without former husband T Bone Burnett. Don't Do Anything is warmer, more organic than many of her previous efforts. Intelligent, textured melodic pop, more accessible than before and a consistently interesting listen. Stand out tracks are 'Sister Rosetta Goes Before Us', already recorded by Plant and Krauss, and here darker and accented by wild gypsy violins, and 'Shake It Down' insistently rhythmic and reminiscent at times of Tom Waits.


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