Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for teh_beabler > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by teh_beabler
Top Reviewer Ranking: 937,147
Helpful Votes: 38

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
teh_beabler "teh_beabler"

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Karrimor X Lite Running Sports Backpack Rucksack Accessories Black One Size
Karrimor X Lite Running Sports Backpack Rucksack Accessories Black One Size

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A good initial design ruined by some cheap components that simply don't last, 7 Oct. 2016
The zip is too fragile and splits open too easily; once it's done it once, it'll keep doing it until it just doesn't close. I had to replace it with a more chunky zip which does a far better job; a poor choice of zip in the original design.

The coating on the the inside of the bag started to flake off after a few months, meaning that every time I open it a few scraps of the inner coating fall out. Presumably that coating is there for a reason; looks like it might be a bit of waterproofing.

Basically, it was just made to too low a budget; cheap zip, cheap coating. A shame, as the structural design is good; straps in good places, lightweight, good shape bag for sitting on the back.


Practical Lock Picking: A Physical Penetration Tester's Training Guide
Practical Lock Picking: A Physical Penetration Tester's Training Guide
by Deviant Ollam
Edition: Paperback
Price: £21.07

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good content let down by shoddy quality of the bookbinding., 31 Dec. 2015
The contents are as other authors say; but it's wrecked for me by the shoddy bookbinding. Pages are just falling out of this book as I turn to them. It really ruins the reading experience. A bad run maybe, but a serious publisher shouldn't suffer this kind of thing.

I give it two stars for that reason; I don't like it. The shoddy bookbinding actively damages my reading experience, drawing my attention from the content to the low quality of the physical product.


Lobachevski Illuminated (Spectrum)
Lobachevski Illuminated (Spectrum)
by Seth Braver
Edition: Paperback
Price: £63.00

5.0 out of 5 stars For the newcomer to Lobachevski's "Theory of Parallels", reading this is better than reading "Theory of Parallels", 6 Sept. 2015
This is a gem; it does exactly what it suggests. It's Lobachevski's "Theory of Parallels" interspersed with very helpful commentary, additional diagrams, extra proofs and discussion. While Lobachevski's original work is a marvel of brevity, it can be a bit opaque and (with no critique of Lobachevski intended) some of his methods are not so clear as they could be; some of Lobachevski's original diagrams (recall that he was writing a century and a half ago, and was constrained by the publishing technology of the day) are not as clear as one might like. Braver starts at the beginning, runs through to the end, and at all times adds illumination. Particularly helpful were cases where Lobachevsky presented his proofs and stopped, but Braver added some important words about why it was so ground-breaking and important.

Containing the entire text of Lobachevski's work as it does, if someone were coming fresh to it, I would recommend reading this rather than just Lobachevski's original. The only downside is that a copy of Lobachevski's "Theory of Parallels" can be picked up for pennies, but this is a lot more expensive.


The Islamist Phoenix
The Islamist Phoenix
by Loretta Napoleoni
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ISIS is not just another terror group, or even an insurgency. They're something new, and this explains why., 22 Aug. 2015
This review is from: The Islamist Phoenix (Paperback)
This book is short, clear and to the point. It's an excellent starting place, and manages to present the undeniable fact that ISIS is not just another group of terrorists. This book makes clear how and why ISIS is building their own country (NOT by simply taking over an existing one, as an insurgency would, but by carving it out of failing states around them), how they see fit, through military force and the subsequent creation of state functions; where they occupy, they become the legitimate government. Not "legal", in that they're an occupying force, but when you're running the courts and the power and the police and the welfare, you become the legitimate government for all practical purposes. It's part of the plan and Napoleoni explains why.

I didn't agree with all of Napoleoni's conclusions (which is itself a good sign that this is not some happy-clappy one-sided view, like some of the other books about ISIS - Sekulow's "Rise of ISIS", for example, is basically a rant about Israel that talk radio listeners will love but carries zero information), but the broad message that they are trying to build a nation (and ultimately legitimacy) and in doing so managing to appeal to a lot of people both within and without their ever-changing borders needs to be understood. ISIS is not just another terror group; they're something different, and it needs to be understood. This short book packs a lot of information in a well-written style, and of the books I've read on ISIS so far, I would recommend this one as a good starting point.


Creating Global Opportunities: Maersk Line in Containerisation 1973-2013
Creating Global Opportunities: Maersk Line in Containerisation 1973-2013
by Chris Jephson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £51.30

4.0 out of 5 stars Not just a history of Maersk, but a view of how shipping modernised and got serious., 30 July 2015
It starts almost in 1874 with Captain Peter Mærsk Møller applying for a Master's ticket, and hoofs on through to 2013. How the company was financed, how they selected their routes, how they adapted to the containerisation revolution. Of particular note is their long history of superior communications; right up until the ubiquity of the internet, their own global communications networks left their competitors in the dust. How they commoditised shipping, making it a routine event to know to the hour when your goods would leave and arrive. The breaking up of the shipping lines that they took advantage of, out-competing many of the shipping companies that simply no longer exist. They bought their own ports, their own depots, set up their own education programmes, and ended up the biggest container shippers in the world.

It's not a quick read, but it's got a good set of pictures, plenty of sidebars, and as the decades roll by guest spots from the economist to remind the reader of that decade's major political, social, economic and technological events to set the context. If you want to understand global container shipping, understanding how Maersk became the big player is part of that.

Intermediate level, four hundred pages and definitely a good one. It's quite possible to read this one in bits, picking out chapters of interest, rather than going cover to cover.


The Three-Body Problem
The Three-Body Problem
by Cixin Liu
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A really engaging first half ruined by the very disappointing reveal., 26 July 2015
This review is from: The Three-Body Problem (Hardcover)
It is good. It is. If you're an SF buff, well worth reading. Sadly, the latter half of the book just doesn't live up to the promise of the first half, and it becomes very disappointing.

The real historical background of the cultural revolution that some of the novel is set against is an engaging, colourful backdrop, and the rising mystery of how some of the laws of physics appear to be changing, with the very foundations of our scientific universe no longer fundamental truths but instead temporary laws that we can't trust to continue either in space (does the universe work differently over here to over there?) or time (will the universe work differently tomorrow?) promising something really grand to come; which is then snatched away and replaced with something far less interesting and trite.

I will read the next book in the trilogy when the English translation is published, but to some extent in the hopes that it will become grand SF again, rather than continue as it ended.


Rise of Isis: A Threat We Can't Ignore
Rise of Isis: A Threat We Can't Ignore
by Jay Sekulow
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.09

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not a serious book about ISIS; a thin excuse for another dull entry in the ongoing U.S. political bunfight, 20 July 2015
This book is a disappointment, and a wasted opportunity. There's very little account of the rise of ISIS; where they came from, anything like that. The book quickly becomes another tiresome part of the endless U.S. political bunfight, although this one does have some breathtakingly laughable lines. One that stuck out particularly was the assertion "The U.N. and the international left often want to see terrorists prevail." That should give some idea of the real agenda here, and it also explains why the book spends half the time talking about Hamas; it would be difficult to talk about Israel, since ISIS haven't reached that far yet, so this is a way to shoehorn Israel into the conversation.

The writing style is simple, which is often a good thing, but in this case the content is also simplified, and frequently lines of text are repeated, in bold, right next to each other. I wish I was making that up, but I'm not. Page 59 of the copy I have to hand has a set of eight lines, repeated word-for-word, one following the other.

If you actually want to know about ISIS, don't waste your time with this book. The previous book on the subject I read, Pat Cockburn's "The rise of Islamic State" was far more informative; if you actually want to know about the subject, try that instead.

This book is a thin excuse for one side of the boring, unhelpful U.S. political bunfight to talk about Israel and decry the United Nations and the current U.S. administration again.


Singapore Swing
Singapore Swing
by John Malathronas
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another view of Singapore, 1 Jun. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Singapore Swing (Paperback)
Singapore is difficult to get a grip on. Turnbull's History of Singapore presents a broad (and excellent) overview of the Lion City, and Malathronas' travelogue complements that with a set of contemporary social encounters; it's possible to even visit Singapore and not see much beyond the squeaky clean public persona, but Malathronas' encounters give an account of a more social side of Singapore.

It is what it is; it doesn't pretend to be a guide book, or a social study. Malathronas met some interesting people and went to some interesting places during his trips to Singapore, and here they are.


The n00b Warriors (Book One)
The n00b Warriors (Book One)
Price: £0.00

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It's really not very good., 2 Jun. 2012
A germ of an idea is not enough to hang a novel on; the germinal idea here, training children using games (which is itself mentioned only in passing) and then sending them to fight a war, has been fleshed out far better elsewhere. At times the author does manage to express the necessary childishness of the protagonists, but such events are few and far between. The rest of the book is a mass of text in dire need of a good editor; the plot struggles to express anything beyond the sightline of the characters, and the insanity of the President is not so much hinted at as brutally hammered into the reader with an overly clumsy metaphor, and at times the plot becomes so bad and heavy-handed that the reader is forced to confront it; death sentence of narrative.

If you're looking for children being trained to fight a war, read "Ender's Game". Actually, read that no matter what you're looking for. If you want the futility of a pointless war that makes no sense, try Haldeman's "The Forever War".
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 26, 2012 4:33 PM BST


The OpenAL Programming Guide (Charles River Media Game Development)
The OpenAL Programming Guide (Charles River Media Game Development)
by Eric Lengyel
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Never put into print, 2 Feb. 2009
This book was never put into print.

Source: conversation with Eric Lengyel.


Page: 1 | 2