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Earth: An alien enterprise
Earth: An alien enterprise
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A real page turner..., 30 Nov. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Superb book for a bargain ebook price and a real page turner. The UK's leading UFO authority Tim Good has written one of his finest books on the subject throwing caution to some of the more outlandish accounts whilst drawing much needed attention to some truly bizarre and disturbing incidents involving the US and UK military. Tim recently said that this may be his last book on the subject - I really hope that this isn't the case. This book is a must have for anyone who has a healthy interest in this fascinating subject.


Music Complete [Double Vinyl]
Music Complete [Double Vinyl]
Price: £21.99

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music Completely., 22 Nov. 2015
A large pro-Hooky part of me was dreading the arrival of this album prior to all the glowing ‘best album since Technique’ reviews.
On the very first listen, over the internet via Youtube (like so many tracks today in this sterile digital age), ‘Restless’ sounded lifeless, dull and predictable much like a Bad Lieutenant track. New Order on auto pilot and such a deflating and unimaginative comeback single and then the fan reviews began to appear on Facebook (where I now seem to spent too much of my life), as copies of the album began to reach people. There was genuine excitement coming from those who had the new album on repeat either on vinyl or CD or digital. People were citing different songs as their stand-out moments which was very encouraging and posting photos of their limited edition clear vinyl and without listening to digital spoilers (apart from the track ‘Plastic’ which I loved instantly), I quickly ordered the clear vinyl via the brilliant Juno Records.

‘Music Complete’ arrived on a sunny afternoon whilst I was off work and I ripped open the packaging eager to play this album in a careless manner where I almost damaged the record sleeve - a feeling that I’ve not experienced in many a year (and I never felt this way for ‘Republic’ or ‘Sirens’ during the first week of release and I shunned ‘Get Ready’ completely until a whole year after its debut).

I’ve been drawn into many recent debates with friends and colleagues concerning the yawn infested ‘CD vs Vinyl - analogue vs digital’’ debate that will probably drag on until the sun goes nova but within a minute of putting the needle on this stunning clear vinyl Mute pressing, the sonics on ‘Restless’ were astonishing. Just a few weeks on from that solitary digital stream play - ‘Restless’ was reaching the hooks and heights of 1993’s ‘Regret’. I’d rubbished the track on one one of the new EY updates and what an embarrassing u-turn in stating that ‘Restless’ is the finest NO single since ‘Crystal’? Modern CDs sound fine when mastered right but the thing with vinyl is the sheer power of the bass without compromising the top end - real drums sound vibrant - Stephen Morris could almost be in your living room as he drives this new anthem that the band will probably now use to open forthcoming live sets.

‘Singularity’ kicks off with an intro that harks back to another Mute act Depeche Mode circa ‘Playing The Angel’ with that Ben Hillier distortion effect over the guitars before it quickly settles into a Joy Division homage and a quick firing sequence or rapid electronic bleeps that were a trademark of ‘Technique’ gem ‘Mr Disco’ - it’s a very brief nod but one that raises a smile and it’s an early hint of how fantastically textured this album is and the sheer range of it’s influences whether it be JD/NO’s illustrious back catalogue or electronic music in general. ‘Singularity’ is a brilliant and deceptive track - the long intro is mainly guitar driven before it reveals itself to be the long lost sequel track to The Chemical Brothers 1999 stomper ‘Out Of Control’ that featured Bernard on guest vocals. This is hi-octane electro and incredibly instant - it really is the version of New Order that most of us hoped for prior to the release of ‘Republic’ in 1993 only to crushed by how digital and flat that album sounded on tinny CD.
A trilogy of fine tracks on side one concludes with ‘Plastic’ - a full-on electro foot stomper so brilliantly produced and mixed that I’m now tempted to fork out a further 60 squid for the deluxe boxset that features ‘Substance’ style remixes of every track. There’s a retro early PSB synth lead which cunningly acts as the main hook over a trademark Giorgio Moroder that graced many of his late 70 early 80s hits including Donna Summer’s genre defining hit ‘I Feel Loved’ yet it still sounds like classic New Order or a track that really should’ve featured on Electronic’s follow-up to their self titled classic of 1991. It is one of many moments on Music Complete where the listener is taken back to Electronic/Marr/Tennant collaborations that burnt so quickly but died so quickly - an era when they single handedly lifted the UK charts.
This stunning trilogy quickly becomes a quadruple of pure gems with the glorious titled ‘Tutti Frutti’ and the electronics and sequencing hark back to Electronic’s finest moments between 1991-1992 kicking off with an intro that’s a bit like Frankie Goes To Hollywood’s ‘Relax’ - this has to be New Order’s next single. There’s a fantastic bridge to the chorus where Bernard singles about being like ‘a setting sun’ and the chorus is pure Daft Punk - stupendously catchy and aided by the superb vocals of EY fave Elly Jackson whose voice blends perfectly with Bernard’s (who’s in fine voice throughout this new collection of songs - a career highlight for him as is the entire production on ‘Music Complete’). The funk is turned up a notch or two with the next track ‘People On The High Line’ which is pure Chic with a loving nod to the bass of Bernard Rodgers. It’s a song that New Order wanted as a single but Mute legend Sir Daniel Miller (who was the executive producer on this new album) stepped in and urged the band to save it for a summer release). The track also features those house piano chords that were so prominent on the Electronic debut - by no means a poor choice for a future single but there are far better ones to come.
Marmite track for many New Order fans is ‘Stray Dog’ that features legendary rocker Iggy Pop reading a poem by Bernard to a driving instrumental from The Other Two (Gillian & Stephen), it’s a tune that could have been lifted from the soundtrack of an imaginary gangster flick. Like the song before it, this is nothing like New Order of old but a pleasant surprise to see the band pushing themselves into new sonic directions which gives this album an edge over the other post-Technique releases. There is a real sense that Bernard and co. are really enjoying themselves at this point.

Familiar Bernard Sumner ground for ‘Academic’ which is no bad thing considering this man’s talent for perfect song structure and earworm choruses that are perfectly suited to get everyone waving their arms too in large arenas across the land. Mostly guitar driven with lots of nods to the melodic melodies of Johnny Marr, ‘Academic’ matches the heights reached by mid 90’s Electronic singles ‘For You’ and ‘Forbidden City’ - two singles that should have been massive had the record buying public strayed from their Oasis / Blur fixation for a moment or two. ‘Academic’ could well be a future single as could be the next tune on offer and one of my choice tracks ‘Nothing But A Fool’ complete with the deceptive Spaghetti Western Ennio Morricone score in the intro. Essentially a love song with Bernard urging you not to ‘let her slip away’, the track has a gorgeous chorus and it’s the first to feature real string arrangements by guest orchestra Stella Martyr. The electronics are back for ‘Unlearn The Hatred’, a slab of retro techno which has synth leads and melodies that hark back to 2002’s almost forgotten gem ‘Here To Stay’.

More fast and frantic electronics for The Game that build to a more reflective but euphoric chorus - a tune that will go down really well live - this is probably the weakest track on the album but only because the rest of the album is of such high quality but there will be people across the globe who’ll adore this track.

The grand album finale is a shamelessly full-on pop tune with guest vocals from The Killer’s Brandon Flowers and it’s the best thing hat he’s done since 2004’s ‘Hot Fuss’ or ‘Human’ a few years later (at a push). Without degrading this track in anyway, ‘Superheated’ wouldn’t sound out of place on one of those Tom Cruise movie soundtracks of the 80’s of ‘Electric Dreams’ but during the final third, a lovely string section from Stella Martyr lifts the track to a rousing climax before you rush back to the record deck to listen to the whole album all over again.

This album has been a total surprise and a huge delight -a perfect inclusion to the illustrious catalogue of Mute Records and an album that sits rather nicely next to the best pop efforts of ‘Goldfrapp’.

Music complete? Music completely.


Blake's 7 - Complete Collection (incl. bonus DVD) [Import]
Blake's 7 - Complete Collection (incl. bonus DVD) [Import]
Dvd ~ Gareth Thomas
Offered by brrsales
Price: £19.99

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishingly good value for money, 21 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If your thinking of revisiting this timeless BBC gem then you really ought to snap up one of these boxsets whilst they're still available. All 52 episodes are crammed into some nifty packaging along with a bonus disc of extras but perhaps the most surprising aspect of this release is that the picture quality and sound are far better than the BBC DVDs that were released here in the UK during the mid-noughties. The interior footage is crisp and very sharp with lush colours (especially evident during the scenes that were recorded within the Liberator flight deck). To my untrained eye, the grainy 16mm location footage also looks a lot better on this Dutch release.
Buy this box set and you'll find yourself watching five episodes a night as it all looks like it was recorded yesterday thanks to the excellent remastering. Highly recommended and a series that was light years ahead of its time.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 27, 2015 9:02 AM GMT


The Magic Whip
The Magic Whip
Offered by NextDayEntertainment
Price: £3.95

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest comebacks of all time..., 23 Jun. 2015
This review is from: The Magic Whip (Audio CD)
I should get the shocking admission out of the way first by revealing that I was never a huge Blur fan during their heyday in the 90's (Pulp were my main obsession during that decade) but since then, I've consigned all my CDs to a local landfill site and have become a vinyl junkie which in turn has led me to this rather brilliant new offering from Albarn and co following several recommendations. It has now been a week since someone lent me their vinyl copy urging me to give it a go and 'The Magic Whip' has rarely left my turntable bar the odd play of Hot Chip's equally brilliant 'Why Make Sense?' album. 16 long years may well have past since definitive Blur were dominating the music press but this new collection of tunes (which almost didn't leave the recording studio vaults) is astonishingly good and very instant. Haunting melodica and superb instrumentation (including some very nifty electronic soundscapes) are all present throughout on what is a very strong and consistent run of tracks. Isolation and TV manipulation are tackled in songs such as 'There Are Too Many Of Us' as Albarn sings; 'For a moment I was dislocated. By terror on the loop elsewhere. Flashing lights advocate it. On the big screens everywhere'. Another album highlight entitled 'If I Was A Spaceman' is epic Blur, possibly a nod to early Bowie as it slowly builds up to a magnificent finale. The production by recording legend Stephen Street is astonishing especially on headphones where every instrument and every layer is given room to breath. Some have question the high asking price for this album on vinyl but it is such a fine pressing and an album that you will play and appreciate over many months possibly even years. Let us pray that Blur release a follow-up in the next 16 years...


The Magic Whip [VINYL]
The Magic Whip [VINYL]
Price: £19.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blur's finest album..., 4 Jun. 2015
This review is from: The Magic Whip [VINYL] (Vinyl)
I should get the shocking admission out of the way first by revealing that I was never a massive Blur fan during their heydays in the 90's (Pulp were my main obsession during that decade) but since then, I've consigned all my CDs to a local landfill site and have since become a vinyl junkie which in turn has led me to this rather brilliant new offering from Albarn and co following several recommendations. It has now been a week since someone lent me their vinyl copy urging me to give it a go and 'The Magic Whip' has rarely left my turntable bar the odd play of Hot Chip's equally brilliant 'Why Make Sense?' album. 16 long years may well have past since definitive Blur were dominating the music press but this new collection of tunes (which almost didn't leave the recording studio vaults) is astonishingly good and very instant. Haunting melodica and superb instrumentation (including some very nifty electronic soundscapes) are all present throughout on what is a very strong and consistent run of tracks. Isolation and TV manipulation are tackled in songs such as 'There Are Too Many Of Us' as Albarn sings; 'For a moment I was dislocated. By terror on the loop elsewhere. Flashing lights advocate it. On the big screens everywhere'. Another album highlight entitled 'If I Was A Spaceman' is epic Blur, possibly a nod to early Bowie as it slowly builds up to a magnificent finale. The production by recording legend Stephen Street is astonishing especially on headphones where every instrument and every layer is given room to breath. Some have question the high asking price for this album on vinyl but it is such a fine pressing and an album that you will play and appreciate over many months possibly even years. Let us pray that Blur release a follow-up in the next 16 years...
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 6, 2015 1:44 AM BST


Left at East Gate a First-Hand Account of the Rendlesham Forest UFO Incident, Its Cover-Up, and Investigation
Left at East Gate a First-Hand Account of the Rendlesham Forest UFO Incident, Its Cover-Up, and Investigation
by Larry Warren
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the greatest and most thought provoking book on the subject I ..., 28 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Possibly the greatest and most thought provoking book on the subject I have ever read. Brilliantly written and hard to put down.


Blakes Heaven
Blakes Heaven
by John Davies
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.00

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much more than just an episode guide...., 28 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Blakes Heaven (Paperback)
For just four short years of my life, 'Blake's 7' appeared on prime time BBC-1 between 1978 - 1981 and despite the gloss and pure good vs evil of Star Wars, B7 was my passion. It was like nothing before (or since) - a dysfunctional band of freedom fighters/terrorists waging a pointless war against an all powerful totalitarian Federation that reached out beyond the frontier worlds. The BBC budget never bothered me and I still continue to find Blake's 'rabble' absolutely fascinating all these years on. The truth is that 'Blake's 7' still remains as the BBC's most subversive series to date though most people don't know this as it was set in the future (even the suits high up within the BBC saw it as cheap ratings grabbing fluff, oblivious to the messages B7 was sending out to an eager and impressionable audience). As a child watching this series, B7 was a warning, a wake-up call to what life would probably be like. Corruption and how absolute power corrupts absolutely. Even the main character of B7 Avon was lead (from series 3 onwards) by a stark realist who abandons the 'fight for liberty' in favour of stealing gold towards the final and fatal shoot-out. I've skipped so much of what made 'Blake's 7' so brilliant but much of it is captured within the pages of this book 'Blake's Heaven' - a collection of passionate essays from people scattered across the current Federation who all beautifully explain how this cult series captured their hearts. B7 merchandise is often forgettable, but this book will take you back to the days when you recorded B7 episodes on TDK audio tapes and will conjure up many other long forgotten memories from when the show was originally broadcast.


Why Make Sense?
Why Make Sense?
Price: £11.52

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Making perfect melodic sense..., 28 May 2015
This review is from: Why Make Sense? (Audio CD)
'Why Make Sense' - a wry nod to Talking Heads 'Stop Making Sense' is HC's first studio album since 2012's practically immaculate 'In Our Heads' - an album that many considered to be the best offering from this curious band of cheeky analogue knob twiddlers and in truth, I was slightly fearful of this new collection prior to release because 'In Our Heads' was so note-for-note perfect How could any new Hot Chip material ever live up to my ridiculously high expectations?

Side 1 begins in spectacular fashion with the glorious 'Huarache Lights' - everything that Hot Chip have done so brilliantly since 'The Warning' threatened to win the Mercury Prize in 2006 is infused in the Chip's circuit board. A baseline that will push your hi-fi speakers to their limits with overdubs to an electro mantra. The fact that this band can pull off a track like this 16 years on from their inception is astonishing and it is one of those Chip tunes that I kept on repeated plays via youtube (possibly more than 14 times in a row she the track premiered) prior to the release of this lovely vinyl edition from Domino Records. It has all the energy and innovation of a band who have just formed and have discovered how to use synths for the very first time - this is the enduring appeal of Hot Chip - they know how to twist those knobs.

Love Is The Future is the next track - it contains a string arrangement from Scritti Polliti legend and BEF collaborator Green Garstide - this all sounds great on paper especially if you consider that 2005 is the 30th anniversary of the brilliant ‘Cupid & Psyche’ album, a supreme lesson in ZTT influenced analogue sequencing. Hot Chip front man Alex recently revealed that he considered Green for a lead vox spin on this track and your kind of left thinking that this track really could have benefiting more from a pure nod to Scritti and if any band could have pulled that off then its this Chip bunch. Instead, we get a rapping interlude from De-La-Sol which is all very pleasant but this track lacks the punch of Huarache Lights.

Cry For You is a track that I could have down without. It’s fine if you haven’t heard ‘Flutes’ but this track practically rips off ‘Flutes’ chord changes except its all slowed down. I don’t mind hearing this track but rather frustratingly, there are four better tracks on the ‘Separate’ EP (on the deluxe CD version).

'Started Right’is a step on from the previous too tracks, its funky and analogue and fairly close to Daft Punk. I still prefer the ‘Separate’ EP tracks to this effort.

‘White Wine and Fried Chicken’ - brilliant title and a slice of analogue country & western with some nice bleeps half way through and a fave of the band. It is all fairly pleasant and a bit too safe by Hot Chip’s very high standards as I rush to the flip side of the disc…

‘Dark Night’ - a gorgeous and proper nod to the brilliance of Daft Punk that easily would have been a stand-out track on the shiny robot’s recent album ‘Random Access Memories’. This was the first track where I actually bothered to get out of my comfy chair in order to pick up the needle (a good 5 feet from where i was sitting) in order to play this track again and again and again. Sublime Chip - a definite single (thought the band will probably opt for something like ‘White Wine and Fried Chicken’ if past single choices from previous albums are anything to go by). ‘Dark Night’ is so deliciously close to the 2010 Kavinsky & Lovefoxxx gem ‘Night Call’ that was later used to such great effect in the 2012 film ‘Drive’ except moodier and full of love as opposed to the stalker-ish nature of Kavinsky tune. This ranks as one of the Chip’s finest ever tunes, it has become my soundtrack as I grapple with dysfunctional machines and an uncertain future.

'Easy To Get’ - funky with fat squelchy Heaven 17-ish basslines not too far removed from At The Height Of The Fighting (He-La-Hu) and the bassline gets even dirtier towards the final third of the track with funny little disco synth leads tripping above it all - the kind of effect that the PSB used to pull off without a hint of a smile - this is a delicious track and one that will become a live fave especially when it goes all early 90’s trance.

’Need You Now’ - Spine tingingly beautiful with a haunting sample from 1983 house hit ‘I Need You Now’ by Sinnamon but with lots of Hot Chip loveliness to reach out to all those who have ever lost a loved one. This is a genius track and in my own distorted reality, ‘Need You Know’ is number one all summer much like Frankie’s Relax in 1983 with permed hair girls wearing white t-shirts with ‘I Need You Now’ in big black letters.

'So Much Further To Go’ - a mid tempo slouchy wine bar track much like one of those haunting PSB Behaviour tracks with the programmed drum patterns. It’s good but nowhere near as good as…

‘Why Make Sense’ - disjointed synths play slightly out of time as Sarah Jones provides brilliant live drums that evoke memories of Stephen Morris best efforts on New Order’s 'Low Life' (try as hard as I can, I can’t air drum to Sarah’s drumming without missing several beats and getting it all hopelessly wrong). Drum machines are fantastic but conventional drums really pack a mighty punch on vinyl and this is partly where ‘Why Make Sense’ succeeds).

Separate EP

‘Burning Up’ - absolutely nothing to do with the Madonna classic from 1983 but this is set to a hypnotic melody before some gorgeously haunting fair ground synths descend like your spinning around in a waltzer at high speed yet still tuning in to the tune blasting out from the speakers above. I love this track and it should have been on side 1.

‘Seperate’ - another funky Chip effort with a few Grandmaster Flash synth moments that bubble above the D-I-S-C-O moments and then a glorious analogue lead kicks in as a lead to a very catchy chorus. I love the warmth of the synths on this one. The Chips were clearly in a very good mood when they recorded this one Again, it should have been on side 1.

'Move With Me’ - pulsating melodic Hot Chip madness! Another fat analogue bassline driving this pounding track. ‘Move with me’ sings Alex to rising analogue synths - all very hypnotic and at this point, you really don’t want this album to *ever* end. There’s even a brilliant bit of guitar -very reminiscent of how Heaven 17 used to mix all these contrasting instruments and styles. This track is over far too quickly..

‘Re-Harmanize’ - very slow build-up that gives very little away until the thumping bassline kicks in and you then know that you are heading into something very, very special. Some delicious guitar licks over some utterly gorgeous synth layers that goes all a bit truancy before the track slowly builds into an onslaught of electronic melodic beauty. This is the best track that Hot Chip have *ever* recorded…even better than ‘Flutes’ or ‘No Fit State’. Absolute ruddy bonkers how this tune was relegated to the final track of the ‘Separate EP’ when it could have been the real gem of ‘Why Make Sense’ but then I guess that an EP full of Side 1 tracks probably wouldn’t have worked.

Patient lovers of soundscapes will get much joy from repeated plays of ‘Why Make Sense?’.


Lp1
Lp1
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A future proof recording, 28 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Lp1 (Audio CD)
A touch of 'Dummy' era Portishead, mixed with plenty of early Kate Bush and for extra lovely topping 'LP1' takes a nod from Bjork's 2001 gem 'Vespertine - a delicious sonic mix for anyone with decent ears. A massive treat for any turntable, this sublime slice of ultra modern vinyl tests and pushes the limits of your speakers with unusually inventive frequencies on either end of the audio spectrum. I could waffle on for ages as to why this vinyl release is a *must-have', just trust me on this and snap up a copy (even if it you opt for the CD). Whatever format you choose to get 'LP1', you won't regret it. This recording is future proof.


Reflektor
Reflektor
Offered by A2Z Entertains
Price: £5.82

55 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here come The Reflektors..., 6 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Reflektor (Audio CD)
Arcade Fire? Just a band...and a hugely over hyped one at that which might go some way to explaining why this 'abstract' and 'difficult' 4th album has divided hard core fans and rock dullard music journalists.

My own personal hero worship of Arcade was a brief two year fling between 2005 and 2007 that ended once I had overplayed the rather brilliant 'Neon Bible' with its gorgeous deluxe CD boxset. By the time that 'The Suburbs' came along, I had totally lost interest, skipped that particularly album despite all the praise and nonsense written about it until a week or so again when 'Reflecktor' blasted out of the radio and lifted a sterile playlist full of Top 40 twerking junk.
Was this really Arcade Fire with a pulsating Giorgio Moroder bassline, deliciously offbeat vocal interplay within a indie disco stomper that was subversively altering the airwaves of Planet Pop? The title track was worthy of further investigation and after one play of both volumes, I was hooked once again by this curious Canadian band and giving the entire album another listen, followed by another listen.

The first thing that struck me about this album as a whole was its wonderful diversity - each track is so different and so brilliantly bonkers how they all build then wrong foot the listener with a nifty chord change or a curve ball in the form of a frantic finish within a clash of ideas. It is this unique brilliance across both volumes that inspires wonder with each play. LCD's James Murphy certainly adds something new and exciting to Arcade's already rich pallet of sounds but his input has been massively overstated by those who have rubbished the album.

'Reflektor' isn't the full-on electronic album that critics claim, nor is it a traditional Arcade Fire album but it is something that will reward patient listeners with a love for vinyl and soundscapes and 'Reflektor' has plenty of that. There's enough 'classic' Arcade to please long term fans on Volume 1 with tracks that flirt with everything including reggae and 'rock' as well as influences that evoke fond memories of Bowie's finest album 'Low' merged with early Talking Heads & Eno. Then there's Arcade's trademark life affirming choruses all sung and performed as though the band are close to breakdown - edgy yet violently happy.

For me, the best is all left for volume 2 that contains my current choice track 'Porno' with its minimalist new wave synths, stripped bare and free of bombastic production that enables the track to take on a hypnotic, twisted journey. Someone really needs to lock Arcade in a studio awash with classic Moogs and other collectable analogue keyboards because 'Porno' could well be a future blueprint for a band keen to embrace new sonic adventures.

Perhaps the biggest compliment I can give to 'Reflektor' is that with each listen, my fave track changes. One night its 'Porno', the next its 'Afterlife' (a track that will be *everywhere* soon trust me) and at the time of writing these words, 'It's Never Over (Oh Orpheus)' has crept into the scheme of things.

Some people think 'Reflektor' is 'too long'? Nonsense I say. It's not long enough.

I want volumes 5 & 6 and I want them now.

The 180g double vinyl is quite steep with a retail price of over 20 pounds but the sturdy cover and inner sleeves are printed on lush light reflective card. This provides a brilliant effect on the inlay of volume 2 which is covered with stylishly spooky phototgraphy from Depeche Mode's visual director Anton Corbijn. Grab this vinyl deluxe edition whilst you can before future pressings revert back to cheaper packaging.
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 30, 2013 8:14 PM GMT


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