Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for N. Pemberton > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by N. Pemberton
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,066,547
Helpful Votes: 27

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
N. Pemberton (Portsmouth UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Le Silence De La Mer
Le Silence De La Mer
Dvd
Price: £0.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you love beautiful black & white photography & startling camera angles ..., 27 Oct. 2014
This review is from: Le Silence De La Mer (Blu-ray)
I won't go into the plot, such as it is, suffice to say if you're remotely interested in French New Wave cinema you'll want to check out this highly influential debut feature by cult director Jean Pierre Melville (Le Samouri etc). If you love beautiful black & white photography & startling camera angles you could do worse than this film. If you're happy to let a movie wash over you & to move you & to lodge itself in your brain for days afterwards check this out.
The central performance by Howard Vernon as the German officer is wonderful, it's such a shame he never hit these heights in movies again, usually to be found in the exploitation films of Jesus Franco as a baddie.
I hope you enjoy this film as much as I did.


To the Devil a Daughter (Wordsworth Mystery & Supernatural) (Tales of Mystery & the Supernatural)
To the Devil a Daughter (Wordsworth Mystery & Supernatural) (Tales of Mystery & the Supernatural)
by Dennis Wheatley
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok(ish) Romp, 16 Feb. 2014
Typical Dennis Wheatley satanism story, lots of details of satanic rituals, heroic good guys, evil satanists. Nice Riviera & Essex locations too. My problem with Wheatley's writing is that it always feels slightly padded out, there's an awful lot of dialogue with characters describing what they're going to do & what they've done & what's going on, lots of telling, not showing. There are some good set-pieces such as what the villain has hidden in a crypt & an exciting climax too, but it'll be a little while before I pick up another book by this author.
Incidentally, my wife was reading another famous Dennis Wheatley satanism book, The Devil Rides Out, having loved the movie version, & found the same problems with narrative pace, lots of explaining, not a whole lot of action, she's now more or less given up with it.


Mystery Mile
Mystery Mile
by Margery Allingham
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Madcap Golden-Age Adventure, 1 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Mystery Mile (Paperback)
My 2nd Margery Allingham after Crime at Black Dudley, also Ms Allingham's 1st & 2nd in the Albert Campion mysteries.
I enjoyed this book though these early Campion mysteries are pretty lightweight compared to her slightly later output, still very readable though.
In this book we are introduced to Campion's factotum, Lugg, combined servant, assistant, nurse-maid & all-round expert in the ways of the underworld, I'm looking forward to seeing more of him in future books.
The basic premise of this book is that Campion is helping an American judge, Crowdy Lobbett, to hide out from the dangerous Simister gang many of whose members have been sent to jail by Judge Lobbett back in the States. He thinks he has a clue as to the true identity of the shadowy head of the gang & his life is now in jeopardy. Will Campion succeed in keeping the judge safe on a small Suffolk island or will he become another victim of Simister?? You will have fun finding out in this early example of Golden Age crime writing.


Cul-De-Sac
Cul-De-Sac
by John William Wainwright
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Find yourself in a Cul-de-Sac, 31 May 2013
This review is from: Cul-De-Sac (Hardcover)
Picked up this book in a charity shop, knew author's name vaguely through a friend who was a fan. Emblazoned on the back cover was a long rhapsodic quote from Georges Simenon, one of my favourite psychological crime novelists, creator of Maigret. Instantly I was intrigued.

The book starts in the form of a diary of John Duxbury, a successful small-business man in a northern town, who has decided to dedicate this diary to his grown-up son in order to explain certain things about John's long, unhappy marriage. Events take a tragic turn & latter parts of the novel involves an investigation by a highly individualistic, remorseless policeman.

Full of ambiguity, this book really stood out to me as something different from the norm. The author spent 20 years in the police force before retiring to become a full-time writer, penning around 80 books in just under 30 years before his death in 1995, which is why I'm pretty impressed by the intelligence & unusualness of this novel, one of about 3 he wrote in 1984 alone.

Fully deserving indeed of Georges Simenon's praise. Highly recommended.


Dead Man's Rock
Dead Man's Rock
by Quiller-Couch
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Rip-Snorting Yarn, 2 May 2013
This review is from: Dead Man's Rock (Hardcover)
I picked this book up in a charity shop not knowing anything about its author but intrigued by the adventure story element reminiscent of Robert Louis Stevenson. What I discovered on the internet was that this was the author's first novel, published in 1887, and that it was the start of a long series of 'Tales & Romances', mainly set in Cornwall where Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch was born & lived for a large part of his life.

His stories include adventure, comedy, historical novels, all of which were very popular in their day but largely forgotten now. The author was also a very distinguished literary critic and compiler of the Oxford Book Of English Verse 1250-1900.

Dead Man's Rock is a fairly naive 1st novel, a romance in the vein of Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, with hidden treasure, tragedy, romance & a cunningly evil villain. The story is fast-paced though heavily reliant on incredible coincidences & is patently ridiculous, but at the same time utterly charming & enjoyable. The author himself in his forward of this 1928 edition rates the book as not terribly good but is fond of it as a first effort. Indeed, in 1898 he completed Robert Louis Stevenson's unfinished novel, St. Ives.

I would recommend Dead Man's Rock to anyone out there who loves an old-fashioned, rip-snorting ripping yarn!


Hawk Moon
Hawk Moon
by Ed Gorman
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Not Gorman's Best, 7 Jan. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Hawk Moon (Paperback)
This is the second in the Robert Payne mystery series, the first of which was Blood Red Moon. That book was a surprising, dark mystery with horror overtones, this second book doesn't quite come up to its level. The prose is crisp & easy to read, in fact I read the book in 2 days, but the central mystery didn't really engage me the same way Blood Red Moon did.

The main protagonist, Payne, a retired FBI profiler, is an engaging one & some of the dialogue is enjoyably sardonic & hardboiled, a staple of Ed Gorman's mystery stories & I have already purchased the third in this series, Harlot's Moon, in the hope that the story is as good as the first book.

Lastly, don't be fooled by Headline's marketing attempts to make this look like a horror novel, from the cover art to some of the blurbs, it's most definitely not.


Never Somewhere Else (William Lorimer)
Never Somewhere Else (William Lorimer)
by Alex Gray
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Disappointing Read, 5 Jan. 2011
I'm sorry, I really wanted to like this book as it's a first effort & the start of a series (& I'm always looking out for a good new series) but unfortunately only managed to read 100 pages before casting it aside in frustration. I found it all terribly cliched & old hat, the lead cop who's not classicly handsome but has the most startling blue eyes, the begrudging working relationship with a psychologist, stilted dialogue I can't imagine anyone speaking, etc etc. I'm surprised to find that the author is a former English teacher as the prose is pretty poor.

I'm so fed up as well with every Scottish crime writer being compared to Ian Rankin in reviews & blurbs, this book is vastly inferior to any of the Rebus series, these painted a vivid portrait of Edinburgh but I got no impression of Glasgow at all from this book.

Sorry to be so harsh in my criticism, I'd been looking forward to reading this book & feel somewhat let down.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 19, 2015 10:42 AM BST


Whisper in the Dark
Whisper in the Dark
by Robert Gregory Browne
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping & Unusual, 14 May 2010
This review is from: Whisper in the Dark (Paperback)
I am prompted to write this brief review after reading the one star one & feeling amazed that this cracking, unusual, well written wholly original bullet of a book should only get one star. I lent this book to several friends who enjoy crime & who really enjoyed it too. Give it a try & you'll hopefully be pleasantly surprised.


Dead Sleep
Dead Sleep
by Greg Iles
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okayish...., 20 Feb. 2010
This review is from: Dead Sleep (Paperback)
It's interesting that a lot of the favourable reviews for this book are by people who say they don't normally read thrillers but really enjoyed this. I guess it could be because it's not very thrilling! That's not to say it's not easy to read, it is, very. Unfortunately it's not terribly well written in the 'she looked into the dark eyes of his soul' school of writing & ever so cliched. As another reviewer has said it ticks all the genre boxes, tough central character with haunted past, poetic artistic villain, hunky troubled FBI hero etc.

The main problem for me is after a fairly thrilling though extremely implausible first few chapters the novel just settles into a tedious round of interviews of suspects, back stories, a little romance & no suspense. I stated skimming pages, something I almost never do, just because I wanted to know what happened at the end but was pretty bored with the journey.

Overall, not terribly impressed, this was the first Greg Isles I've read & it'll will be a while before I read another.


REQUIEM MASS
REQUIEM MASS
by Elizabeth Corley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed, 15 Jan. 2010
This review is from: REQUIEM MASS (Paperback)
I was looking forward to reading this, I enjoy series crime novels & I was hoping for a gritty realistic detective thriller. Unfortunately what I got was a rather clunkily written police procedural with dated chatacterisation, a bit like a very early Ruth Rendell Wexford book. The main policeman a Detective Chief Inspector no less, is rugged, his sidekick sergeant looks up to him in an adoring if occasionally baffled manner & it's all terribly British. I think this would be a good book for readers who enjoy fairly cosy crime fiction with the odd bit of salaciousness thrown in but unlike another reviewer I found no resemblance to Mark Billingham's infinitely more thrilling Thorne novels. Worst of all I found myself skimming pages to try & finish it in order to start something better.


Page: 1 | 2