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Library Mice (Somerset)

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Angelina Ballerina
Angelina Ballerina
by Katharine Holabird
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A must for little ballet fans!, 15 Jan. 2009
This review is from: Angelina Ballerina (Paperback)
My 3 year-old daughter has just started ballet and what better tale to accompany this new experience but this wonderful picture book which is 25 years-old this year!
Angelina is a little mouse who loves to dance. She dances at home, at school and even in her dreams! Unfortunately, all this dancing gets in the way of all the other things she should be doing, like tidying up, doing her homework and being helpful at home. Angelina's parents decide it is time for her to start ballet and send her to Mademoiselle Lily's lessons. Angelina turns out to be a gifted dancer and becomes a very happy mouse and eventually a great ballerina.

What I particularly like about this story is the positive message it send about children (or mice!) being happier if they take part in some kind of physical activity. What my daughter particularly likes about it is that it is all about ballet, and that Angelina wears a pink tutu! So everybody is happy!


Tokyo Mew Mew: v. 1
Tokyo Mew Mew: v. 1
by Mia Ikumi
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A real fun manga, 14 Jan. 2009
This review is from: Tokyo Mew Mew: v. 1 (Paperback)
Ichigo is visiting the endangered species exhibition at the museum with Masaya, the boy she is infatuated with, when a odd-feeling earthquake puts an end to their date. What she does not know yet is that during the odd incident, her DNA has just been merged with the DNA of an almost extinct animal,the Iriomote cat. Soon after the incident, she meets Ryou and Keiichiro, who tell her the truth of her new condition. Her new powers will be put to good use; she will protect the Earth from invading aliens . But her first assignment is to find the four other girls who have been also affected ; Café Mew Mew, which Keiichiro manages, becomes their headquarters. Although she is enjoying her new life, she is also struggling to juggle it with her normal life and especially with seeing Masaya.

This is a real fun manga. I found the layout a bit messy at times, and as I am still a bit of a novice as far as manga-reading is concerned so it was a bit frustrating at times but I still really enjoyed it. The characters definitely have the cute factor, and like Sailor Moon we are definitely in the "magical girl" type of story. The characters are endearing, and despite its lack of originality, you'll definitely be drawn into wanting to read more, I know I did, I am on the 3rd volume now!


Rita and Whatsit! (Rita and Whatsit) (Rita & Whatsit)
Rita and Whatsit! (Rita and Whatsit) (Rita & Whatsit)
by Jean-Philippe Arrou-Vignod
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great little series which well worth discovering!, 14 Jan. 2009
It's Rita's birthday today and she is feeling a bit grumpy. She doesn't like any of her presents; they are either too small too big or too ... middle-sized: she doesn't know where to start .... until one starts leaping! Inside she finds a little dog who doesn't not liked to be bossed about! After a lot of chasing about, the dog settles down and Rita struggles to come up with a name that suits him. She finally settles for Whatsit and the dog's reaction surprises Rita. This is the first book of the adventures of this absolutely fantastic duo. Rita is very bossy an determined, and her dog-with-no-name is cool as cucumber and very philosophical. It has been incredibly popular in its native France and it is easy to see why: Tallec's minimalistic illustrations compliment perfectly Arrou-Vignod's humorous text.

Other titles in the series include: Rita and Whatsit at School, Rita and Whatsit at the Beach, Christmas with Rita and Whatsit , Rita and Whatsit at the Beach and Rita and Whatsit's New Friend.


Mr Peek and the Misunderstanding at the Zoo
Mr Peek and the Misunderstanding at the Zoo
by Kevin Waldron
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £10.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great discovery!, 14 Jan. 2009
This book got brilliant reviews and was listed in most of the main newspapers' summer reading lists. It looked like it would be good fun for my five year-old son and so it was! Every morning Mr Peek, puts on his favourite jacket and goes off on his round in the zoo. But this particular morning, the jacket feels a little bit tight and as Mr Peek mutters to myself as he walks around the zoo, a massive misunderstanding between him and the animals starts to develop. This is a brilliant book; the children loved the story, which they found hilarious, and the artwork is very original, very "retro".


The Graveyard Book
The Graveyard Book
by Neil Gaiman
Edition: Hardcover

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book, defintely one of my favourites of the year!, 14 Jan. 2009
This review is from: The Graveyard Book (Hardcover)
I'd never read anything by Neil Gaiman before; "Not my thing", I'd decided. Then I watched the film adaptation of Startdust and thought maybe I'd give it a try after all. But I never did. And then all the publicity for The Graveyard Book started appearing ... and talk about judging a book by its cover. As a school librarian I should be ashamed to admit it but I decided to read the book purely because of the magnificent cover by Chris Riddell! I probably wouldn't have bothered if only the David McKean cover had been available. And what a mistake that would have been! Because WOW, what a book!
Bod is only a toddler when his whole family is murdered by the Man Jack; narrowly escaping, he takes refuge in a nearby graveyard. After many discussions, the ghostly inhabitants decide to look after him and he is adopted by Mr and Mrs Owens. Under the watchful eye of his guardian Silas, Bod grows up as a living boy in a dead man's world, with all the abilities of a ghost. But the Man Jack cannot rest until he has finished the job and is still on the lookout for Bod.
This is a fantastic fantasy book and a great coming-of-age book. There is lots of action, plenty of twists (some of them I did not see coming!) and enough gory creatures to keep fans of this genre entertained. But most of all, it is an amazing love story. Gaiman writes so well you forget that Bod's parents are in fact ghosts and his guardian a vampire; what you take away from this story is the sheer feeling of devotion for a child (the last chapter was heart-breaking for me but I think that's just because I am a mum and the thought of "letting go" of your child is quite hard!).


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