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Chris Sampson "ChrisSampson87" (London, UK)

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One pack of 20 Zensect Bouchard Moth Proofer Balls with a New & improved formula and a Lavender Fragrance. These moth proofer balls protect all fabrics for up to 3 months and leave no stains. Efficient & safe for all the family including and efficiency indicator to let you know when to change.
One pack of 20 Zensect Bouchard Moth Proofer Balls with a New & improved formula and a Lavender Fragrance. These moth proofer balls protect all fabrics for up to 3 months and leave no stains. Efficient & safe for all the family including and efficiency indicator to let you know when to change.
Offered by S Household
Price: £3.37


Betron BT1010 Wireless Bluetooth Headphones Earphones for Sports
Betron BT1010 Wireless Bluetooth Headphones Earphones for Sports
Offered by Betron Limited ( VAT Registered)
Price: £29.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sturdy running headphones, 7 Mar. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought these especially because they looked well-made and durable. They are, so I'm pleased. The battery does run out a bit sooner than I'd like, but this isn't a problem once you get into the habit of charging them when you're at a computer. Because of this, they might not be ideal if you don't spend a lot of time at a computer. They charge very quickly though. Setting them up was very easy on both my Nexus 4 and Nexus 10, and I like the feature whereby the headphones read the number to you when you're receiving a call. The sound quality is fine, though they don't sit particularly well in my ears which allows for too much ambient noise. If I can figure this out then I may return to give 5 stars. I like wearing them when running and the clip is usually sufficient to stop the controls bouncing around in my face.


The Cost Disease: Why Computers Get Cheaper and Health Care Doesn't
The Cost Disease: Why Computers Get Cheaper and Health Care Doesn't
by William J. Baumol
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The rising cost of healthcare is a global phenomenon. ..., 6 May 2015
The rising cost of healthcare is a global phenomenon. Why? Because the relative productivity of labour intensive industries inevitably - and inexorably - declines. Computers get cheaper; healthcare doesn't. It's a simple idea, now proven by historic data and in need of appreciation. The cost disease allows - encourages, even - affordable increases in spending on health. Though incisive, Baumol's book inevitably labours this central argument. But to understand trade-offs in public spending you need a firm grasp of the cost disease. This book provides a means to that end, and delivers important context for any discussion about healthcare, education, economics and politics.


Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies
Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies
by Richard Layard
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better mental health care is a no-brainer, 13 Jan. 2015
Mental illness reduces national income by about 4%, and yet we only spend about 13% of our health budget and about 5% of our medical research funds on tackling the problem.

As an economist who writes a fair bit on mental health, I regularly trot out statements like this about how costly mental health problems are to society and how the under-provision of services is grossly inefficient. To some the point may now seem obvious and trite. As evidence grows ever more compelling, government policy slowly shifts in response. One success story is the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative, which has greatly improved the availability of evidence-based treatment for some of the most prevalent mental health problems in the UK. Yet in many cases we still await adequate action from the government and decision-makers. Two key players in getting IAPT into government policy were Richard Layard – an economist – and David Clark – a psychologist. In their new book Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies, Layard and Clark demonstrate the need for wider provision of cost-effective mental health care in the UK.

The book starts with a gentle introduction to mental illness; what it is, who suffers, the nature of treatment. This will give any reader a way in, with an engaging set-up for what follows (though with one third of families including someone with a mental illness, most people will find the topic relatable). The opening chapters go on to dig deeper into these questions; do these people get help, how does it affect their lives and what are the societal impacts? These chapters serve as a crash course in mental health and though the style is conversational and easily followed, on reflection you’ll realise that you’ve absorbed a great deal of information about mental health. More importantly, you’ll have a deeper understanding. This isn’t simply because of the number of statistics that have been thrown at you, but because of the personal stories and illustrations that accompany the numbers. This forms the first half of the book – ‘The Problem’ – which encourages the reader to start questioning why more isn’t being done. Economists may at times balk at the broad brush strokes in considering the societal ‘costs’ of mental health problems, but the figures are nevertheless startling.

From there the book continues to build. In the second half – ‘What Can Be Done?’ – the authors go on to explain that actually there’s a ton of effective therapies available. We know what they are and who they work for, but they aren’t available. There’s no doubt that the view of the evidence presented is an optimistic one, but it isn’t designed to mislead; where evidence is lacking, the authors say so. The book seems to be written with the sceptical academic in mind; no sooner can you start to question a claim than you are thrown another baffling statistic to chew on. Various therapies are explored, though the focus is undeniably on depression and anxiety and on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Readers with CBT bugbears may feel alienated by this, but should consider it within the broader scope of the book.

Readers would do well to stop after chapter 14. Things go sharply downhill from this point and could, for some readers, undermine what goes before. This would be a great shame. In all seriousness, chapters 15 and 16 would be better off read at a later date, once the rest of the book has been absorbed, understood and – possibly – acted upon. In the final chapters Layard and Clark make distinctly political proposals about how society should be organised. The happiness agenda takes centre stage. In places, mental illness is presented as simply the opposite of happiness. This is an unfortunate and unnecessary tangent. I have some sympathies with the happiness agenda, but for many I expect these chapters would ruin the book. The less said about them the better.

It is a scandal that so many people with mental health problems do not have access to the cost-effective treatments that exist. Layard and Clark demonstrate convincingly that the issue is of public interest. Thrive has the potential to instill in people the right amounts of sympathy, anger and understanding to bring about change. Many will disagree with their prescriptions, but this should not detract from the central message of the book.


Harry's Last Stand: How the world my generation built is falling down, and what we can do to save it
Harry's Last Stand: How the world my generation built is falling down, and what we can do to save it

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Personal stories for political action, 21 July 2014
An emotive defence of the society denied to us by neoliberalism. Tales from Harry’s 91 years are woven into a fact-of-the-matter narrative of today’s status quo. From upsetting accounts of a hungry childhood in the Great Depression to triumphs of love against the odds. Parallels are drawn between our brutal past and today’s social malaise, with striking effect. Harry’s angry and disturbed, but most of all he’s worried. Is society so inflicted by the wilful myopia and amnesia of government that Britain’s post-war progress will be completely undone? Harry’s seen this before, and we should listen.


Quack Policy: Abusing Science in the Cause of Paternalism (Hobart Papers (Paperback))
Quack Policy: Abusing Science in the Cause of Paternalism (Hobart Papers (Paperback))
by Jamie Whyte
Edition: Paperback

1 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Weak, 5 Nov. 2013
I found this IEA publication very difficult to read, because almost every paragraph is flawed; sometimes logically, often evidentially and at times morally. The book takes what any undergrad might learn in Econ101 and applies it to current challenges and policy responses in health and climate change. All with gusto and arrogance. Whyte has little regard for the policy context, or for much of economic thought from the last 40 years. Most arguments depend on false analogies, which are painful to read. In the author's own words: "Science progresses by ignoring mere opinion, expert or otherwise". Thank goodness for that.


Dead Language
Dead Language

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As good as Cavalcade, 23 Oct. 2013
This review is from: Dead Language (MP3 Download)
At first listen you may think that the new album from The Flatliners lacks the heat of their last, but in a few spins you'll realise that Dead Language lacks nothing. The variety of tempo and style demonstrated on Cavalcade is replaced by an assured step towards a more consistent and measured sound, which does cause the album to sag as we approach the climactic closers. Still, Chris's growl has developed into a roar and ensures that none of the tracks feel weak. The album hosts some of the band's best songs to date and I, for one, am relieved.


The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run or Ruin an Economy
The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run or Ruin an Economy
Price: £4.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Room for a follow-up, 23 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Tim Harford brings us some macro. For me, a less interesting topic than those of his previous books. Nevertheless, he's a great writer with a knack for simplifying tricky concepts and, as with his previous books, this is an enjoyable read. Harford only really dips his toe into the complexities of macroeconomics, but I was still able to gain a better perspective on the current debates; the different arguments being stripped - as far as possible - of the politics that envelop them. The book is exhaustively researched and the reader is treated to plenty of interesting factual and historical tidbits throughout.


The Humble Economist: Tony Culyer on Health, Health Care and Social Decision Making
The Humble Economist: Tony Culyer on Health, Health Care and Social Decision Making

4.0 out of 5 stars Valuable lessons, 17 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A collection of 21 abridged essays summarising Tony Culyer's most important contributions. Fellow health economists may have already read the book's constituent parts, but much can be gained from digesting them in this form. The book presents Culyer's work as a cohesive set of ideas, woven together in his unmistakable style and approach; best characterised by the book's title. For non-economists interested in health research, the book disarms economics of its alienating features that lead to confusion and misunderstanding about what economists actually do and why they do it. For economists, herein lies an exemplar approach to your discipline.


Never Again?: The Story of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 - A Study in Coalition Government and Policy Making
Never Again?: The Story of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 - A Study in Coalition Government and Policy Making
by Nicholas Timmins
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Not boring, 25 Sept. 2013
I increasingly find politics a bore, even in relation to health and economic policy. Timmins's Never Again? precludes my usual reaction, providing a lucid and engaging narrative. The story guides us through the Act's conception, rejection, amendment and assent, identifying the key players from academia and Westminster along the way. The book enables you to leave your political inclinations at the door, and at times I found myself sympathising with Lansley! It also provides a nice overview of the ultimate nature of the Act at the end of its tumultuous journey; something I struggled to figure out at the time.


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