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Tallulah Does Tea (France)

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Handmade Home: Simple Ways to Repurpose Old Materials into New Family Treasures
Handmade Home: Simple Ways to Repurpose Old Materials into New Family Treasures
by Amanda Blake Soule
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring stuff, 6 Oct. 2011
I am a follower of the Soule Mama blog and could not wait to get my hands on her new book. Amanda is a beautiful writer, plain and simple. Many of the ideas for projects in this book are not going to set your creative world alight, but the text, the dream, the family fun to be had, it will bowl you over!
I often pick up the book to get a dose of feel good inspiration, if you have kids and enjoy crafting for family and home, you will love this book.


Wee Wonderfuls: 24 Dolls to Sew and Love
Wee Wonderfuls: 24 Dolls to Sew and Love
by Hillary Lang
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.99

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy to follow patterns!, 29 Sept. 2011
This is such a sweet book. The first that struck me was the overall quality of the book, it is a harcover, the overall design is wonderful and it has lots of inspiring photography. I flick through it frequently just to enjoy the eye candy!
There is a good variation of patterns and if you're a beginner to making toys, then this book is a great start. The variety of projects allows you to hone new sewing and skills with which you can later develop your own variations of the patterns.
The patterns are clear and concise and very beginner friendly.
I loved the elephant bag and the selection of bears are especially delightful. Worth every penny and highly recommended for beginners and more experienced crafters.


Creating Sketchbooks for Embroiderers and Textile Artists: Exploring the Embroiderers' Sketchbook
Creating Sketchbooks for Embroiderers and Textile Artists: Exploring the Embroiderers' Sketchbook
by Kay Greenlees
Edition: Hardcover

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Book for the Beginner to Sketchbooks and Journals, 29 Sept. 2011
I bought this book on a whim, and I think I was expecting a more practical guide to sketchbooks for textile artists. This book has lots of lovely photography and some great ideas, but I was rather hoping for practical advice on how to add textiles to a sketchbook etc as this is something I struggle with, bits falling out, overall massive bulk and what not, ideas about the actual construction of sketchbooks rather than ideas about what to actually put in them. Even so, there are some lovely ideas in this book for what to include in your sketchbook, but nothing at all about putting it together from a literal perspective. If you are an artist who already understands the personal value of creating sketchbooks, you probably won't find this book very useful (as the book is mostly about this), there are much more inspiring books about for inspiration alone. If you are a student or beginner of textiles, then this is probably worth a read.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 19, 2013 7:58 AM BST


Baby-led Weaning: Helping Your Baby to Love Good Food
Baby-led Weaning: Helping Your Baby to Love Good Food
by Gill Rapley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.09

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 10 Dec. 2009
I bought this book after the birth of my third child. Both of my eldest two were weaned the traditional way (purees and spoon fed), and after reading about this book on Amazon, I was intrigued enough to buy it, it just sounded so easy.

15 months on, my baby is the best eater on the block. I self weaned her at 6 months, as per the instructions in this book (and it isn't rocket science - very much a case of give them food and let them get on with it).
Not only does my baby eat pretty much anything and everything, but because she eats herself we can all sit down and enjoy meals together, rather than one adult having to focus on feeding baby.

At first I was dubious, it was a good few weeks before I felt baby was getting any food in her (she mostly just played with it - but the author did say this is what would happen), but babie's like to copy and she soon clocked that everyone else was putting the food in their mouth's and followed suit.

My baby is now 15 months old, and uses a spoon and plastic fork, she has never used a sippy cup, just a normal plastic beaker, and whilst she does make a crazy mess, it is all part of the learning process and honestly no messier than weaning a baby the traditional way (it helps to have a greedy dog on standby to hoover up though).

I hope to have one more babe and will self wean again, it is just SO much easier. No faffing about preparing seperate meals, no seperate meal times, no filthy jars of ready made baby food at restaraunts. I think I have the only 15 month old in town who happily tucks into curry or fillet steak.

Perhaps it's self weaning, or perhaps being more relaxed with my third baby - either way, I am happy to trust her instincts and let her eat as she pleases, when she is hungry she eats, when she isn't she throws it on the floor and the dog gets fat. Ces't la vie.

If you have a fussy eater or are too lazy to puree, get this book.


Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain
Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain
by Sue Gerhardt
Edition: Paperback

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST for any parent, 12 Dec. 2008
I bought this book on a whim without really knowing in which context it was written, whilst I was surprised, I was not dissapointed.

This is not a wishy washy parents handbook with vague advice, it is a very thorough study into the development of babies based on the care given. It is no easy read, but certainly a worthwhile one.

I must add, that if you are reading it following the birth or impending birth of a second, third or fourth (and so on) child then prepare yourself for an almighty guilt trip! I was certainly never what a social worker might call a Neglectful Mother, but I had my children during a highly emotional and difficult time of my life, reading this book I saw the error of some of my previous ways and the discovery of how they may affect your child is quite a profound wake up call.

Every new parent should read this book!


Practically Perfect
Practically Perfect
by Katie Fforde
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dull, 2 Aug. 2008
This review is from: Practically Perfect (Paperback)
I always finish what I start, and so despite not enjoying this book a great deal I forced myself to read it all. It is the first book I have read by this author, and I won't be reading anymore from her.

First of all, one look at the cover and you would think you were getting a jolly good dose of youthful chick lit, the reality is quite different.
It took me a while to pin point what was irritating me about the book, until I realised that the main character, who must have been in her mid twenties, sounded more like someone in their mid 50's, this made more sense when I realised how old the author was herself. It became increasingly frustrating, plodding story line, boring romance, all written by a more mature woman who simply cannot pull off the thoughts, actions, language and ideas of a young twenty something.


The Name Book: Over 10, 000 Names: Their Meanings, Origins, and Spiritual Significance
The Name Book: Over 10, 000 Names: Their Meanings, Origins, and Spiritual Significance
by Dorothy Astoria
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dissapointing, 3 Mar. 2008
Whilst there are a lot of names in this book they are mostly Christian based, and even include a verse of scripture for each name.

Also, the names are not organised by gender, in fact, there isn't any indication at all as to whether or not a name is for a girl/boy/unisex, very frustrating if you know the sex of your baby, as you have to wade through all the names, rather than being able to only review the names suited to boys or girls.
I would have personally thought that names categorised by gender would be an obvious must.

As I said previous, this is a Christian driven publication with a lot of information about Christian meanings and even the introduction harps on about the History of names in Christianity.
If you are Christian, it's an ok book, if not, pass on this one.


The Life Laundry: How to De-junk Your Life
The Life Laundry: How to De-junk Your Life
by Dawna Walter
Edition: Paperback

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening stuff - but what about recycling?, 23 Oct. 2007
I bought this book, as though I have recently moved (and thus disposed of most of my junk) I am a complete hoarder and thought it might help me to keep on top of my new tidy and uncluttered home!

It is true to say that most of the advice is obvious, but of course cluttered homes are not created out of logic, and sometimes the obvious does need to be pointed out.

To my sheer horror, after reading this book I discovered not only had I not really de-junked my life properly when I moved, but also, that only 3 months after moving I am already slipping back into old habits, this book has helped me get back on top of things and gives good advice on how to keep up the good work.

My only gripe is that almost every other sentence says BIN IT, as a keen enviromentalist and recycler I think this is irresponsible advice. For a start, many of the items the book suggests you bin (such as old blankets, surplus towels and sheets etc) could be used again, and I don't understand why the author does not recommend these are items are donated to charity shops or other needy organisations, OR sold on ebay, which would perhaps generate some cash for much needed storage for those things that don't have a place.
It was the "Bin your Blankets" (cause we have duvet's and don't use them anymore) that bothered me the most, as woolen blankets are not readily available these days, and are in fact quite valuable, particularly if they are of an unusual design. If you can't be bothered to sell your junk at least let the charity shops benefit from your laziness!

I like this book a lot and believe anyone who has a cluttered home will benefit greatly from following it's advice, just be a little bit more eco friendly and money savvy in the process!


Fashion A History From The 18th To The 20th Century (Midi Series)
Fashion A History From The 18th To The 20th Century (Midi Series)
by Kyoto Costume Institute
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FIRST CLASS!, 31 Dec. 2004
If, like me, you like your fashion reference books to have oodles of pictures, with a full description of each item, with close ups and historical/designer info as well as info about coonstruction, then this is the book for you!
Every page is mouthwatering, with exquisite care and detail given to each photo and description, an absolout must have!


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