Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle New Edition - Sgt. Pepper Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for Warrior Cat > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Warrior Cat
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,408,751
Helpful Votes: 6

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Warrior Cat (UK)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Skarsnik (Warhammer Heroes)
Skarsnik (Warhammer Heroes)
by Guy Haley
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A mixed effort, in terms of warhammer fiction it probably falls somewhere in the middle, 13 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you are reading this review chances are that you already familiar with the name of the titular character. If not suffice to say Skarsnik is one of the most famous goblins in the warhammer setting, a warlord who dominates the ruined dwarf hold of Karak Eight Peaks. This book is his life story, or at least one version of it - as I shall explain the matter of who is telling the story is not straightforward.

The book itself is presented as the work of one academic publishing the work of another academic who in turn interviewed a playwright who in turn got the story from Skarsnik in person. This level of multi-level story telling can sometimes be confusing and there are certain passages that don't really fit to the person supposedly relating them. Also you are never clear whose voice you are really reading. There are parts of the book where the author captures the wicked malicious character of the goblins really well but at other times I felt Skarsnik's own account comes across a bit too honest, frank and for want of a better word: human. At such times the tone is less that of the self-aggrandizing tyrant and more that of the modern celebrity memoir. On the upside though the author does create a decent cast of supporting characters and gives a good flavoured account of the tribal workings of the night goblins and the trappings of the underworld in which they live.

Sadly, as usual with Black Library publications, I must point out that the book description given on the cover is full of mistakes. Either the editors don't read the books properly or they simply cut and paste a copy of the author's original pitch - regardless of any changes that later occur during the writing process. In this case there is no 'greenskin horde threatening the border of the Empire', the setup is simply that a nobleman from Averheim has some estates over in the Border Princes so he wants to know more about greenskins.


Death's Legacy (Warhammer:  Blood on the Reik)
Death's Legacy (Warhammer: Blood on the Reik)
by Sandy Mitchell
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A depressing end to the series, 8 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the 3rd and final instalment of the Death on the Reik series. As with the other titles in this series the cover art bears no relation whatsoever to the content of the book. Having left Marienburg at the end of the previous book the main characters are now heading to Altdorf. Slightly annoyingly this is in the opposite direction to where they started in book one and so involves some backtracking past areas where they've already been.

I must say I had found the previous instalment in this series a disappointment, it was only the fact that this was the last book and belief that the author must eventually be going somewhere with this series that kept me reading. While I did find this book slightly better in terms of plot development I was nonetheless left very disappointed. For one thing the true climax of the book comes several chapters before the finish, leaving things to trail off toward an unsatisfactory ending. But the real disappointment was with the characters, with the author having established them reasonably well initially in book one I felt that neither Rudi nor Hanna was given the chance to develop in the way they should have been. Personally I wasn't satisfied with the ending given to either of them. Furthermore it felt at the end as though the outcome for each of them was predestined from the very start and that neither character had any power to avoid it or change it. To sum up: tedious and depressing.


Death's City (Death on the Reik)
Death's City (Death on the Reik)
by Sandy Mitchell
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Whoever chose the cover should be sacked, 8 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Whoever chose the cover should be sacked. I hate to start like this but it really annoyed me that much. For the unaware the cover shows a chaos warrior of Khorne. However there are no chaos warriors in this book whatsoever.

As other reviews have mentioned this is the 2nd instalment in the Death on the Reik series, continuing the story of Rudi and Hanna now joined by Fritz. The trio escape from the camp of the witch-hunter who had captured them at the end of book one, but not before he places a mark on Hanna's forehead to block her magical powers. The trio then continue their journey to Marienburg arriving there a few chapters later with most of the book set inside the city itself.

Frankly I found the story painfully slow and drawn out, with a lot of time devoted to the three country kids gawping at all the large buildings or all the wide canals with long bridges. In parts it felt more like a roleplay sourcebook than an actual novel. Given that Rudi came to Marienburg to find answers he does not exactly hurry to try and find them. In fact quite the opposite, when important characters try to offer him information he simply shouts things like "I'm not listening to you". At other times he comes across the activity of what are obvious chaos followers and even hears them plotting but is still too stupid to register them for what they are. Obviously these are the author's ways of teasing things out, but in the process he makes his main character come across as a complete idiot. When the penny finally drops at the end it's something we as readers worked out two books earlier. In fact beyond the opening chapter where they confront the witch-hunter the novel offers very little in the way of plot-advancement at all, there's one scene where Rudi finds an important plot-clue written on a piece of paper but that's about it.


Wild Kingdoms (Warhammer)
Wild Kingdoms (Warhammer)
by Robert Earl
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A nice story that covers new ground, though could have gone further, 7 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a sequel to The Burning Shore and involves the same pair of main-characters namely the Brettonian adventurers Florin and Lorenzo. Although there are some references to past events it is not actually necessary to have read the previous book. The story revolves around the fate of a young girl called Katerina. At the beginning she is travelling with her father in a merchant caravan that is attacked by goblins. She is rescued by an ogre mercenary but everyone back home assumes she died along with the rest of the caravan. Then ten years later her mother hears news that she is still alive and living with the ogres in the ogre kingdoms, so she recruits Florin and Lorenzo to go and fetch her back.

What I liked about this book was that it covered new ground in the sense of taking you outside the Old World to areas that have not previously been written about very much. The other thing I really liked was the character of Katerina, of all the plot-ingredients it was her story and character that really kept me interested.

On the negative side I would say that I found the final third of the book a bit dull, the main reason for that is that I found the ogres somewhat one-dimensional, as portrayed they are a fairly brutal and nihilistic lot: all they really care about is eating stuff or fighting each other. The author attempts to paint a distinction between the 'good' ogres and the 'bad' ogres but to me one lot were not much better than the other. On the positive side though the goblins in this book, who are in effect the book's second set of villains, are portrayed extremely well with plenty of dark humour.

One other issue I had was that aside from making the actual journey to the ogre kingdom Florin and Lorenzo, the supposed main characters, don't really get given much to do. The early section of the book sees them being guided to their destination by other characters, while the final third of it really sees them as little more than bystanders to wider events in which they hav no control nor influence. Also we only really get to visit one ogre town near the edge of the mountains, being critical I actually would have liked the author to take his characters deeper into the mountains and explore the various ogres kingdoms a bit further.


Headtaker (Warhammer Heroes)
Headtaker (Warhammer Heroes)
by David Guymer
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting subject matter but never quite delivers, 24 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In the opening prologue a skaven thief witnesses an orc raid on the dwarf hold of Karak Azul, led by the infamous warboss Gorfang Rotgut ( an established event many warhammer orc fans will already be familiar with). We then fast-forward fifteen years to the present day where the Skaven Council of Thirteen are annoyed that the dwarfs of Karak Azul are supplying other dwarf holds with weaponry and decide that the hold must be taken. The warlord chosen to perform this task is Queek Headtaker. Meanwhile the dwarfs themselves are preparing for war against the orcs. Although Queek is the titular character the story is told from multiple perspectives with roughly equal amount of time devoted to the dwarfs and the skaven. Needless to say the skaven characters spend a lot of time plotting against each other.

For me personally this was a part of the warhammer world I was pleased that they decided to explore further. The first issue for me with this book however is that the plot seemed to contain quite a few holes. Another issue was with the character of Queek and how he was presented, aside from being a good fighter he is really quite clueless when it comes to leading an army or indeed doing anything that doesn't involve killing with his own paws. Thirdly the author had a habit of continually putting his characters in scenarios where any form of survival seems largely implausible then letting them avoid death in ways that don't feel realistic, meaning that by the end of the novel there are several characters who by rights really should have been dead several times over. Finally the ending itself is a mess of unresolved loose-ends.

If you want to read about dwarfs and skaven then yes this book has it's moments, but for me personally it's also a case of a plot-potential that is never quite fulfilled.


Grudge Bearer (Warhammer)
Grudge Bearer (Warhammer)
by Gavin Thorpe
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Reasonable rather than spectacular, but dwarf fan-boys will probably still like it, 4 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This story follows Barundin the new king of Zhufbar and his attempts to lead his people while also settling grudges for past wrongs done against them and fulfilling an oath made by his father.

I found the writing standard basic but adequate. And much the same with the plot. The story while unremarkable in itself does give you a good insight into the workings of dwarf culture in warhammer. It also establishes the king of Zhufbar as a character within the setting and gives that particular hold a sense of background. On the downside there were a few moments in the plotline that I did not find convincing, in particular the ending - though I won't spoiler it.


Death's Messenger (Warhammer)
Death's Messenger (Warhammer)
by Sandy Mitchell
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A promising start but..., 8 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
First off let me start with a couple of minor complaints. First the book's cover art bears no resemblance to anything in the story whatsoever, I am guessing here the publishers were too tight to commission fresh art so instead they just pulled up a random stock-image out of their archive. Second having read the book start to end I am not really sure what the title stands for either.

Having got both those off my chest I must say that found this book to be an interesting read. To summise the plot the two main characters are a young youth called Rudi, the son of a forester, and also a girl of similar age called Hanna. They are both living in a remote village in The Empire when a series of events causes both of them to fall under the suspicion of a witch-hunter. Fleeing the village they make their way across the countryside toward the city of Marienburg where they hope to find safety. Along the way they have various further encounters and also get to know a bit more about each other.

Here I should add the cover-blurb product-description provided by the publisher is totally inaccurate in terms of both actual events and how it describes the motive of the main protagonist. Beastmen are a threat in the background however no beastmen actually attack the village. Rather it is a strange outbreak of disease and the machinations of local chaos worshippers which set the events in motion. Secondly Rudi is relatively happy living with his father and has no desire to leave the village until the decision is forced upon him.

On balance I liked this book for the way it set up the mystery surrounding the main characters and the mystery of the events unfolding around them. However even though I liked it I would still caution against it because in my mind the two sequels that follow it are simply not as good.


Warcraft: Lord of the Clans: Lord of the Clans No. 2
Warcraft: Lord of the Clans: Lord of the Clans No. 2
by Christie Golden
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent read - especially for all Warcraft players, 5 May 2003
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the story of Thrall, a yong orc slave who is trained as a gladiator by human masters but escapes in order to seek out his own people and lead them to freedom. The storyline gradually reveals more about the culture and history of the orc clans, interesting for those already familiar with the Warcraft games. After their total defeat in the wars the orcs are looking for a way forward, which involves rediscovery of their identity and a return to their honourable shamanistic traditions of the past.
Thrall's story has echoes of Sparticus and Conan the Barbarian. As a reader you can empathise with the chatacter as he goes through a series of harsh ordeals before finally emerging as Lord of the Clans.


Page: 1