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Reviews Written by
Bobby Smith (United Kingdom)
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Handheld Shower Head in Chrome with 5 Showers Modes for Bathroom
Handheld Shower Head in Chrome with 5 Showers Modes for Bathroom
Offered by Saienfeng Directly
Price: £15.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Stylish Looking Head., 13 Jun. 2017
This is a very nice looking and functional shower head. It is of a good quality and should last for many months, depending on usage. It has five variations on the water; massage, spray, rainfall, circular massage and rainfall plus massage. However, each of the settings is fine. The main plus side is the easy action of the settings – as you just move the lever at the bottom of the head. I should also mention that this is probably the most beautiful head I have ever had – as the blue looks so nice. Unlike some heads I have had over the years this is very lightweight and so will not cause too much of a strain on your bathroom fittings. Overall this is a fab product that gits my shower perfectly - see picture. In short, this is a decent shower head that should appeal to most.
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BOGI Cooling Towel For Instant Cool - 100cm x 30cm - Soft Cool Bamboo Fiber - Use as Scarf Headband Wristband Bandana for Yoga Workout Fitness Travel Climb Golf Football Sports Heat Relief (BE Blue)
BOGI Cooling Towel For Instant Cool - 100cm x 30cm - Soft Cool Bamboo Fiber - Use as Scarf Headband Wristband Bandana for Yoga Workout Fitness Travel Climb Golf Football Sports Heat Relief (BE Blue)

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cool and fab., 28 May 2017
If, like me, you hate the heat, then this is the ideal product, as you merely soak it in water and then apply to hot skin. Personally I find it is best suited when very wet and wrapped around the neck – so the water slowly drips down my belly. Of course, if you prefer, you can just wring it out so it is merely damp. In addition, you can wrap it under your clothes, around your arm or as a fancy piece of headgear. After about 20 or so minutes it is best to soak again to enjoy it at maximum capacity. Handily it comes in a little carry holder that makes it easy to transport. A nice touch was a little leaflet showing you how to wear it - just in case you could not work it out! In short, a great idea and now a summer essential.
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Lapasa Men's CUPRO Performance T-shirts - ADVANCED ANTI-ODOR TECHNOLOGY - Running Gym Top Wicking Sports Tee (XL, Blue)
Lapasa Men's CUPRO Performance T-shirts - ADVANCED ANTI-ODOR TECHNOLOGY - Running Gym Top Wicking Sports Tee (XL, Blue)
Offered by ASAS-UK
Price: £13.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Looks great and feels fab., 25 May 2017
If you are a fan of jogging or other bodily improving habits, then I heartily recommend this t-shirt as the material – 9% spandex - soaks up sweat like a chamois leather sponge. I ordered the extra-large size and it was loose enough to be worn comfortably, albeit with little room for expanding into extra extra large. The material has a nice smooth feel to it and it is very light weight, even when drenched in sweat. Like other clothes made of spandex it dries very easily when washed and is therefore ideal for those who have a hectic and fast lifestyle. The underarm has a mesh type fabric that enables air to circulate pleasantly round the body. Personally, I would have preferred it to have had a deeper neckline, to aid ventilation even more, but you cannot have everything. The only odd thing with it is that the initial smell – when the packet was opened - was that of cheese and onion crisps! Have no fear, though, as this wore off after a couple of minutes. In short, a good shirt that should encourage more to get fit.
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CMYK GU10 LED Bulbs, 40W Halogen Bulbs Equivalent, 3W, 350lm, 120° Beam Angle, 2200K Warm White, MR16, LED Light Bulbs, Pack of 6 Units
CMYK GU10 LED Bulbs, 40W Halogen Bulbs Equivalent, 3W, 350lm, 120° Beam Angle, 2200K Warm White, MR16, LED Light Bulbs, Pack of 6 Units
Offered by AlanTan
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Very bright., 21 May 2017
Although this is a new company for me I found this product to be very useful, seeing as how you get no less than 6 GU10 bulbs for the relatively cheap price of £8.99. The bulbs themselves give off a strong beam and they are ideal for using in ceiling recesses. As ever, with such bulbs, they are easy to install – simply twisting and slotting into the socket. One of the major plusses is that they do not get hot when in use – a problem I often had with the cheaper type bulbs. The low energy factor is very desirable and the design of the bulb is easy on the eye. It came well packaged and with each bulb in its own small cardboard slot. In truth, I do not know what is not to like about these; they look good, save you money and are cheap. A nice bulb that more than does the job intended.
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On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century
On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century
by Timothy Snyder
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not his finest hour., 21 May 2017
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I have always enjoyed the writing of Timothy Snyder, finding him well versed on the subjects of genocide and man's inhumanity to man. Therefore I was looking forward to his latest work. Oh dear, what a let down, for it is nothing more than a none too subtle rant about Donald Trump - for page after page. Now, while I can see his point - that the personality cult of tyrants needs combating on all levels - as a work of art it lends itself to boredom as there are only so many times you can suggest that he is a dangerous and egotistical man. As a result, the end product is a pamphlet that can be read in an hour and one that fails to engage the more cerebral parts of the brain - surely the very same parts we need in these volatile times? A disappointment.
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20 Jahre Popperklopper
20 Jahre Popperklopper
Price: £9.83

5.0 out of 5 stars Not to be missed., 20 May 2017
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This review is from: 20 Jahre Popperklopper (Audio CD)
This is a best of of one of the very best Deutschpunk bands - who sound a lot like 'Alle Gegen Alle' period Slime. The CD is chock full of classics but the best thing is the live DVD, as it features the most amazing sound quality I have ever heard of a live concert on disc. A must buy for all punks.


The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam
The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam
by Douglas Murray
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.91

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Culture v Religion., 20 May 2017
If you read only one book about immigration and the problems that having a rapidly growing Muslim community brings then I heartily recommend this book, as it is so well-written. To start with Mr Murray describes, in often heart-rending detail, the difficult journeys that migrants into Europe face, at the mercy of both people smugglers and the cruel sea. And, once here, they then face another lengthy trek before the bulk of them end up in Germany, by dint of Merkel’s open invitation. Somewhat surprisingly the author is quite balanced on Merkel, seeing her constrained by the Nazi past of Germany and the desire to be seen as doing the right thing, aside from the obvious moral choice she made. Of course, the rest of Europe was not consulted over her decision, leading to tensions throughout other member states of the EU – notably Hungary. Murray then proceeds to show us how Islam is not compatible with the Western way of life, although, as he points out numerous times, our leaders tend not to know what our ‘Western’ cultural values are. This, then, is the crux of the book, how we balance our benign versions of culture and a declining Christianity against the Islamists.

Of course, there is a risk that a discussion of this nature may well stir up racial hatred but why should the population not be allowed to discuss issues, such as mass immigration and the perhaps inevitable cultural ‘death by diversification’ that such a flow of people brings. Surely normal people, who genuinely want a world where people are judged by their character as opposed to their skin tone, can see that everyone benefits by opening up the debate. Anyhow, I would argue that not discussing such issues brings with it even more danger of racial hatred, as people notice the streets changing in front of their eyes more than blinkered politicians.

Murray’s main ire, though, is for the leaders who continually mislead us as to the benefits of ‘diversity’ and ‘positives’ that mass Muslim immigration brings. He clearly shows how each European country is struggling to integrate millions of people and paints an often nightmarish picture of the world in 60 or so years. Although I tend to share his worries, I personally feel it is too soon to write off the possibilities of a new togetherness being forged across the religions. Certainly, when I sit and swap stories with my Muslim colleagues, I feel a sense of optimism that we can forge a better future, together, rather than apart. Then again, that might just be the liberal optimist in my heart overcoming the pessimist conservative in my brain.

Where Murray is spot on, however, is where he shows how our politicians have blatantly lied to us about numbers and integration strategies – basically because they haven’t got any. His anger is most definitely not directed towards migrants – apart from those who behave in a bestial manner. No, his main targets are the organisations that get themselves twisted up into knots when it comes to the unmentionable negatives of immigration. Almost unbelievably the book contains a bizarre letter written by a German anti-racist woman who had been raped by three immigrants in Germany. Quoting her words at length Murray shows how she was more worried about the anti-immigrant hatred that might be stirred up, by dint of her being raped, than the actual crime committed against her. I just could not get my head round this at all.

In another very good chapter Murray laments the absence of thinkers in society at large and I reckon he is definitely onto something here – as I too often despair at the inane conversations that fill our TV screens, not to mention our pubs and shopping centres. He then elaborates by highlighting our diminishing Christian faith and the lack of confidence in our Western ideologies – our ‘tiredness’ as he aptly puts it. By way of contrast, the incomers, courtesy of their ‘strong’ religion, have an ideology that is rock solid by comparison. Surely, though, the way around this is for us to tell migrants into Europe that many of their cultural practises, such a nonsensical ‘honour crimes’, are barbarous acts that are culturally inferior – a word that many do not like to use for all the obvious connotations regarding superiority complexes. Of course, the colonial guilt our leaders often display will render this hard, if not impossible to achieve.

Another way to do this is to demonstrate more confidence in a shared European cultural outlook – ironically at a time of Brexit – to show incomers that our cultural values are as important to us, as their religion is to them. Indeed, just about the only area where I disagree with Murray is where he sometimes confuses religion with culture, as I would argue it is cultural practises, especially with regards to the way women are treated by North African men, that led to the mass sexual assaults on German women in 2016, rather than a religious motivation. Unfortunately, as it stands at the moment, European leaders seem to view European culture as being like an empty pizza base, desperate for something stronger, tastier, to put on it – the much heralded diversity we are all supposed to value. What, though, if the topping gets too heavy and cracks appear in the dough?

Who knows, perhaps the flow of Eastern European Christians and Catholics, recently flocking to our shores, will turn out to be our ‘saviours’ – our version of the Prussians rushing to Wellington’s aid at Waterloo. Whether our farmhouse remains standing by then, nobody knows, as ‘we’ have already given away the keys to our house.

Murray has assumed that Europeans will continue to allow their culture to be eroded, the so called death by a thousand cuts. What, though, if a resistance movement starts up in years to come – and I don’t mean street protestors like the EDL. Children who are 18 or so today, having grown up on a constant drip drip effect of news stories about ISIS atrocities, both here and abroad, might openly defy their leaders and riot on the streets. As the parent of an eighteen-year-old I already hear at first hand anti-Muslim sentiment from youngsters, inadvertently caught up in the propaganda war currently raging. How do we keep such ideas from taking hold on our own youth, with perhaps their own radicalisation only a generation or two away?

Overall, I found the tone of the book to be depressing especially for those of us who put a high price on European cultural values, built up over countless centuries – all seemingly at risk of being dominated by a ‘new’ religion impinging on our way of life. As someone who has personally benefitted from past immigration to the UK – my wife of twenty years is the daughter of a Nigerian immigrant – I found myself desperately wanting to disagree with Mr Murray and the terrifying vision he describes. However, the quality and thrust of his arguments are just too hard to dismiss out of hand, and I found myself nodding my head at virtually every page.

Nobody can predict the future with certainty but it might turn out - perhaps in 80 years or so – that we have to import millions of child-bearing West African Christians to balance the demographic time bomb in our midst – if one takes this to extremes.

How long will it be, for instance, before European homosexuality is deemed illegal once more – given that it goes against one of the strongest parts of the Muslim faith? What is equally puzzling is why the Left are so quiet on this subject, as the book correctly points out. The Socialist Worker types seem to have given up on causes that once took their attention – anti-Semitism and gay rights - in the belief that Islamophobia trumps all in the victimhood stakes. As a result, the usual victims will come to the fore again; Jews, women and gays – disproportionally the targets for the extremist Islamist mind-set, here in Europe. Is that really what the ‘anti’ racists and assorted left-wingers want?

To conclude, the confusion of our governments – so well-highlighted in this book – shows that all of them have put their trust in the idea that a new ‘Westernized’ version of Islam will take hold, with the unpleasant negative parts airbrushed from history. This might, eventually, come to pass but what if it does not?
Do we have a Plan B?


Laune Der Natur: Special Edition
Laune Der Natur: Special Edition
Price: £20.14

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars German punk rockers in nod to the past., 11 May 2017
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First up the Hosen CD is the typical Hosen sound: crunchy guitars, rasping vocals, not to mention catchy sing-a-long choruses that stick in your head for weeks afterwards. The fast songs are fab to listen to but the album is let down by a clutch of slow numbers, that fail to get this old punk rockers pulse a racing. However, the additional CD of English punk cover songs is an absolutely killer album as it shows complete respect to those who first put down the three chord battle-cry of youth. The interesting thing here is the sheer diversity of material, ranging from well-known songs, such as Teenage Kicks, to more obscure tracks, like Johnny Moped. Of course, I remember tears ago reading an interview with Campino, in the pages of Sounds (which dates it), when he said that to Germans all English punk is on a par - rather than the big three of the Pistols, Clash and Damned. As a result, The Adicts and Peter & the Test Tube Babies share the same platform as the Buzzcocks and The Ruts. So well done to the Hosen for once again proving their punk roots.


Tomons Wood Swing Arm Desk Lamp, Designer Table Lamp, Reading Lights, Study Lamp, Work Lamp, Office Lamp, Bedside Nightstand Lamp, LED Bulb Lamp - Green
Tomons Wood Swing Arm Desk Lamp, Designer Table Lamp, Reading Lights, Study Lamp, Work Lamp, Office Lamp, Bedside Nightstand Lamp, LED Bulb Lamp - Green
Offered by Inateck
Price: £59.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for bedrooms., 14 April 2017
If you like all things IKEA make then you will love this wooden reading light, as it has more than a touch of the Swedish retailer look to it – by dint of the product’s gorgeous wooden arm. Although it does require a small amount of self-assembly – the arms and bolts need to be screwed on – this is easily accomplished within around five minutes. Overall it is a light product and gives off a more than suitable beam, useful for when doing homework or reading books. It has a slightly old-fashioned feel to it, although this has never been a problem for me. It does come complete with an LED bulb so you have everything you need to get it up and running. The wooden design is its main selling point, I think, and it looks lovely in my daughter's bedroom. In short this is a quality product that adds class and sophistication to a room – or so my daughter tells me.
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Tom Ross: The Game's Gone
Tom Ross: The Game's Gone
by Anneli McLachlan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Geography., 8 April 2017
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I thought Alan Partridge came from Norwich?


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