Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle New Album - Foo Fighters Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for Philip Ashbourn > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Philip Ashbourn
Top Reviewer Ranking: 6,854,930
Helpful Votes: 6

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Philip Ashbourn

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Roads Were Not Built For Cars: How cyclists were the first to push for good roads & became the pioneers of motoring
Roads Were Not Built For Cars: How cyclists were the first to push for good roads & became the pioneers of motoring

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN EXCELLENT READ, 9 Jan. 2015
An excellent read - essential not only for all interested in transport history but for those motorists who think that they alone have the divine right to use the roads. The book covers the development of the cycle and how especially the pneumatic tyre and the Rover safety bicycle made road improvements necessary. It points out that it was the work by these early cyclists that literally paved the way for the roads of today, enjoyed by millions of motorists, but which has been mainly written out of history. it was the early cyclists who had the necessary engineering skills to go on to develop the motor vehicle and even aircraft. The book lists in great detail the large number of today's household names in motor vehicle manufacture that were founded by cyclists.

Today, apart from motorways, our roads are open legally to all and should be designed on this basis. Sadly our road engineers, aping their American cousins, mainly design roads only for motor vehicles and all other users risk their lives using them. Carlton Reid deserves our thanks for this book.


Pedalare! Pedalare! A History of Italian Cycling
Pedalare! Pedalare! A History of Italian Cycling
by John Foot
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars COMPULSORY READING, 19 Jun. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is should be compulsory reading for all cycle racing fans. The book highlights the golden era of Coppi and Bartali from the late Thirties to the middle Fifties as well as covering Italian cycle racing, particularly the Giro, before and after. What makes this book different is that the author relates the racing to the politics of the time - the war and the immediate aftermath when divided loyalties had lasting effect. The role of the Catholic church and the political parties in this mix is explored.

The author blames the growing use of motor cars and scooters, television and doping scandals, which combined to remove the close links to the sport from a population that used the bicycle as the main form of transport, for the demise of cycle racing as Italy's number one sport. Sadly, the author sees no return to those days. I am old enough to have lived through the Coppi and Bartali era when their racing epics were well recorded in the continental cycling magazines we were then able to buy even in small Lincolnshire towns. My big regret is that I had a ticket for the Coppi track appearance at Herne Hill but chose instead to support a clubmate in a local 25.

The author occasionally slips up on the technicalities of cycle racing but this is a only a minor quibble for a well researched and written book.

Highly recommended.


Page: 1