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Llonya "Llonya" (Virginia Beach, Virginia)
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Maigret and the Man on the Boulevard (Inspector Maigret Mysteries)
Maigret and the Man on the Boulevard (Inspector Maigret Mysteries)
by Georges Simenon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.31

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Walk along the street of sorrow, The boulevard of broken dreams, 4 April 2011
Where gigolo and gigolette
Can take a kiss without regret
So they forget their broken dreams." Harry Warren/Al Dubin.

Georges Simenon was prolific in both his literary and public life. Simenon turned out hundreds of novels and his obsession with writing caused him to break off an affair (he was prolific in this area of his life as well) with the celebrated Josephine Baker in Paris when he found he could only write twelve novels in the year they were involved. Although perhaps best known for his Inspector Maigret detective novels, Simenon also wrote over a hundred novels that he referred to as `romans durs' (literally "hard novels"). These hard stories typically involved a person's descent from normality (or a life that seems to bear the appearance of normality) into nihilism and despair. NYRB has reissued a number of hard stories and Penguin has republished quite a few Maigret stories.

When Louis Thouret is found murdered just off the Boulevard Saint-Martin Inspector Maigret is called to investigate. Maigret thinks of this as a run-of-the mill stabbing that occurs but when Mrs. Thouret is asked to identify the body she seems shocked by the fact that he is not wearing the same clothes (including some shockingly racy brown shoes his wife would never have permitted him to wear) he had on when he left for work that morning but his wallet contained far more money than he normally carries. These oddities pique Maigret's interest. What brought Thouret to this Boulevard? What caused him to wear a second set of clothes and those fancy brown shoes? How did Thouret manage to acquire the hefty wad of cash found in his wallet? As the plot develops Maigret seeks to unravel the mystery of Thouret's murder and also the explanation behind what appears to be Thouret's double-life as it played itself out on and around the streets and alleys near the Boulevard Saint-Martin.

The tone and style of Simeon's hard stories differ significantly from his Maigret mysteries. In "Maigret and the Man on the Boulevard", however, we have a character, Thouret, whose dual life seems to mark him as someone who could have been the subject of a hard story. Here, it seems as if Maigret appears just when the hard story ends, and his investigation takes a look back in time to discover how this life ended the way it did. I enjoyed this connection between the two types of Simenon stories. I always enjoy the Maigret mysteries but this walk along a boulevard of broken dreams was, for me, one of Simenon's best Maigret efforts.


The Man on the Boulevard (Penguin Red Classics)
The Man on the Boulevard (Penguin Red Classics)
by Georges Simenon
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Walk along the street of sorrow, The boulevard of broken dreams, 4 April 2011
Where gigolo and gigolette
Can take a kiss without regret
So they forget their broken dreams." Harry Warren/Al Dubin.

Georges Simenon was prolific in both his literary and public life. Simenon turned out hundreds of novels and his obsession with writing caused him to break off an affair (he was prolific in this area of his life as well) with the celebrated Josephine Baker in Paris when he found he could only write twelve novels in the year they were involved. Although perhaps best known for his Inspector Maigret detective novels, Simenon also wrote over a hundred novels that he referred to as `romans durs' (literally "hard novels"). These hard stories typically involved a person's descent from normality (or a life that seems to bear the appearance of normality) into nihilism and despair.

When Louis Thouret is found murdered just off the Boulevard Saint-Martin Inspector Maigret is called to investigate. Maigret thinks of this as a run-of-the mill stabbing that occurs but when Mrs. Thouret is asked to identify the body she seems shocked by the fact that he is not wearing the same clothes (including some shockingly racy brown shoes his wife would never have permitted him to wear) he had on when he left for work that morning but his wallet contained far more money than he normally carries. These oddities pique Maigret's interest. What brought Thouret to this Boulevard? What caused him to wear a second set of clothes and those fancy brown shoes? How did Thouret manage to acquire the hefty wad of cash found in his wallet? As the plot develops Maigret seeks to unravel the mystery of Thouret's murder and also the explanation behind what appears to be Thouret's double-life as it played itself out on and around the streets and alleys near the Boulevard Saint-Martin.

The tone and style of Simeon's hard stories differ significantly from his Maigret mysteries. In "Maigret and the Man on the Boulevard", however, we have a character, Thouret, whose dual life seems to mark him as someone who could have been the subject of a hard story. Here, it seems as if Maigret appears just when the hard story ends, and his investigation takes a look back in time to discover how this life ended the way it did. I enjoyed this connection between the two types of Simenon stories. I always enjoy the Maigret mysteries but this walk along a boulevard of broken dreams was, for me, one of Simenon's best Maigret efforts.


The Outlaw
The Outlaw
by Georges Simenon
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Make a new plan, Stan, 4 April 2011
This review is from: The Outlaw (Hardcover)
Georges Simenon was prolific without ever being prolix. He wrote hundreds of novels, most notably his Inspector Maigret mysteries. But some of Simenon's best work in my opinion can be found in what he called his "romans durs" ("hard stories"). In those stores you typically find a middle-aged male, leading a middle class life or a petty criminal living life on the edge of society. In each story the protagonist hits a bump in the road (often of his own making) and this slight bump takes him off his normal life path and puts him on a wild downhill road to the depths of darkness.

Simenon's Maigret stories and romans durs are enjoying something of a new life with new issuances by Penguin (Maigret) and New York Review of Books Press (romans durs). However, many more remain to be reissued and I've read all the reissued Simenons. As a result, on a recent trip to my public library I couldn't resist picking up two `older' Simenons, "The Outlaw" and The Rules of the Game that have not yet found their way into a new edition. "The Outlaw" is a good example of Simenon's hard story format and is well worth reading.

Stanislas Sadlak, (Stan), is an illegal immigrant from Poland living in Paris in the late 1930s. He has fled Poland rather than face criminal charges for murder. He is not a likeable character at all and as the book opens he and his girl-friend Nuschi are down and out and on the edge of starvation. Stan botches an attempt to rob a taxi driver and in desperation reaches out to the Paris police. He offers to rat out a violent gang of Polish criminals living in Paris in return for enough cash to get him and Nuschi back on their feet again. After this `introduction' Simenon takes us on the rough bumpy ride that flows from Stan's decision to turn informer.

There is a lot to like about "The Outlaw". Simenon does a very good job of portraying Stan as a very unsympathetic character. Nothing that has ever happened to Stan has been his fault. Nothing. In fact, none of the characters in the book, even the police, have much in the way of redeeming or appealing character traits. Simenon is not one for false empathy or redeemed criminals. Life is tough in the demimonde and so are the villains and the police that go after them. There is no one to root for and, so, the reader is left with nothing but the story. But in the hands of Simenon the story is more than enough. As I mentioned at the outset, Simenon was prolific. However, the writing in each of his books is sparse and free of adornment. The story begins, it moves quickly, and it ends. If you are looking for tortured, complex sentences and deep musings on the meaning of life, Simenon is probably not for you. He tells a story and leaves the musings to the reader, not his characters. The story was enough and it was both satisfying and absorbing.

I'd recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Simenon or just an interest in good, dark stories. L. Fleisig


Omon Ra
Omon Ra
by Viktor Pelevin
Edition: Perfect Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everyone's gone to the moon, 1 April 2011
This review is from: Omon Ra (Perfect Paperback)
Victor Pelevin's "Omon Ra", written in 1994, tracks the career path of Omon Krivomazov from his childhood as a stargazing child who wants nothing more than to fly in space, through his acceptance into the Soviet space program, his training as a cosmonaut where he is selected to be a standard-bearer of Soviet science and exploration. Omon Ra (as he comes to be called) is chosen to be the first Cosmonaut to be sent to the moon. But the devil is in the details and Omon quickly finds that life and his travel plans are not quite what he may have expected when he joined the space program.

A lot of the pleasure from Omon Ra was from the twists and turns of the plot and the various revelations along the way and it would do harm to reveal more than the bare bones of Omon Ra's journey to the moon. Suffice it to say - the bare outline mentioned about does no justice to a book that is brilliantly subversive, funny, and thoughtful.

I think the most memorable aspect of Omon Ra for me is Pelevin's style. I know that many people, when they think of Russian and Soviet literature think of dark foreboding where despair is the norm and where ones existence is set out in great detail in dense tortured prose whose many threads require all one's concentration to untangle. Pelevin is having none of that and in fact his writing style is fluid, easy to follow and most of all, humorous. To that extent he is more similar to Vladimir Voinovich than to any other Russian/Soviet writer I can think off.

Pelevin's satire and his prose style is what make him, like Voinovich, so subversive. His story does not bang the reader over the head with a hammer (or sickle) to rail against the empty promises and fake myth-building upon which his nation is built. No need for that when making the reader laugh at the lunacy that passes for science and governance. Pelevin is more Swift or Twain than Zola or Dos Passos.

Some may see this book as a parable limited in its application to the USSR. There's certainly something to be said for that idea. The book is, after all, written by a Russian about life in the USSR. I think people reading Omon Ra will come away chuckling at the absurdities of life in a now-extinct regime. However, I think they may also come away thinking that behind the myths any nation creates for itself there may lie an Oz-like man or group screaming "pay no attention to the man behind the curtain." More often than not - where there is smoke there is also mirrors.

Omon Ra was a pleasure to read. Highly recommended. L. Fleisig


Omon Ra
Omon Ra
by Victor Pelevin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everyone's gone to the moon, 1 April 2011
This review is from: Omon Ra (Paperback)
Victor Pelevin's "Omon Ra", written in 1994, tracks the career path of Omon Krivomazov from his childhood as a stargazing child who wants nothing more than to fly in space, through his acceptance into the Soviet space program, his training as a cosmonaut where he is selected to be a standard-bearer of Soviet science and exploration. Omon Ra (as he comes to be called) is chosen to be the first Cosmonaut to be sent to the moon. But the devil is in the details and Omon quickly finds that life and his travel plans are not quite what he may have expected when he joined the space program.

A lot of the pleasure from Omon Ra was from the twists and turns of the plot and the various revelations along the way and it would do harm to reveal more than the bare bones of Omon Ra's journey to the moon. Suffice it to say - the bare outline mentioned about does no justice to a book that is brilliantly subversive, funny, and thoughtful.

I think the most memorable aspect of Omon Ra for me is Pelevin's style. I know that many people, when they think of Russian and Soviet literature think of dark foreboding where despair is the norm and where ones existence is set out in great detail in dense tortured prose whose many threads require all one's concentration to untangle. Pelevin is having none of that and in fact his writing style is fluid, easy to follow and most of all, humorous. To that extent he is more similar to Vladimir Voinovich than to any other Russian/Soviet writer I can think off.

Pelevin's satire and his prose style is what make him, like Voinovich, so subversive. His story does not bang the reader over the head with a hammer (or sickle) to rail against the empty promises and fake myth-building upon which his nation is built. No need for that when making the reader laugh at the lunacy that passes for science and governance. Pelevin is more Swift or Twain than Zola or Dos Passos.

Some may see this book as a parable limited in its application to the USSR. There's certainly something to be said for that idea. The book is, after all, written by a Russian about life in the USSR. I think people reading Omon Ra will come away chuckling at the absurdities of life in a now-extinct regime. However, I think they may also come away thinking that behind the myths any nation creates for itself there may lie an Oz-like man or group screaming "pay no attention to the man behind the curtain." More often than not - where there is smoke there is also mirrors.

Omon Ra was a pleasure to read. Highly recommended. L. Fleisig


The Queue (New York Review Books Classics)
The Queue (New York Review Books Classics)
by Vladimir Sorokin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps better suited for the stage?,, 30 Mar. 2011
Jean Cocteau wrote that a line is life and that "[w]ith the writer, line takes precedence over form and content." In his first novel, "The Queue", Vladimir Sorokin, takes a different sort of line and manages to have the life of that line take precedence over the form and structure of a traditional novel. The result is a moderate success.

Set in Moscow during the Brezhnev era a random group of strangers form up in a line to purchase some unknown sort of consumer product and spend more than a day waiting in line to purchase the unknown product. The book plays out as a series of random conversations along the line. People come and go, they fight over their place, complain about the sales clerks and the apparatchiks who jump the queue, flirt, sleep, and complain some more. As noted by Sorokin in an afterward to this edition, "an era can be judged by street conversations", and that is exactly what he sets out to do.

The snippets of conversation are funny, ironic, and revealing. They reflect very well, in my opinion, an era in which the desire for consumer goods outweighed the ability of the USSR to produce and sell them. The result was a society in which lines were ubiquitous and an accepted (if grudgingly so) fact of life.

The concept and structure of the book was fascinating to me. The snippets of conversations sounded authentic and were often both humorous and subversive. However, the very structure which made the book sound so intriguing also served to diminish my enjoyment of it. The characters were anonymous and the ebb and flow of conversations were a bit hard for me to track. As often happens when you are on a line you often come into the middle of a conversation, or hear only snatches of it, and can only grasp at the whole meaning. That's not a bad thing and is a natural enough occurrence in `real life'. However, the disjointed nature of the text was a bit jarring to read. I could keep track of the various anonymous characters that pass along the line for the most part but I often found myself scrolling back to place some of the text in context.

I did enjoy reading "The Queue" but I kept thinking as I turned the pages that this is dialogue that would work better on a stage where it can be heard and seen. I think a staged production of this book could be excellent. Ultimately, I think of The Queue as an experiment in form that didn't quite work. However, the writing itself was witty and insightful and did paint a pretty evocative, satiric picture of life in Moscow during what Sorokin (and others) refer to as the period of stagnation. Sorokin's Afterword is a valuable addition to the text and I wonder if it wouldn't serve the reader to be read as a preface rather than an afterword.

I do recommend this book even though I think the work itself would be better performed than read. It does require some concentration but there are enough brilliantly written `snippets' to make the experience worthwhile. I think The Queue would be of particular interest to those with an interest in Soviet literature and history since I think they are more likely to `get' many of the asides and self-referential jokes made in the text.
L. Fleisig


Ice Trilogy (New York Review Books Classics)
Ice Trilogy (New York Review Books Classics)
by Vladimir Sorokin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "He casteth forth his ice like morsels. Who can stand before his cold?", 30 Mar. 2011
Psalm 147:17

The ice gets cast forth like rice at a wedding in Vladimir Sorokin's dark, Russian fantasy, "Ice Trilogy". Sorokin's work is well-known in Russia and the subject of much controversy. One of his earlier books, Blue Lard, was the subject of a lawsuit brought by a Russian nationalist group claiming that his depiction of `intimate relations' between a clone of Stalin and a clone of Khrushchev was pornographic and defamed the Russian people. Not unexpectedly the suit resulted in a tremendous increase in sales. Similarly, in the recently-released Day of the Oprichnik, Sorokin looks at a futuristic Russia and sees a world where violence and brutality are the norm.

In an interview with Spiegel, the German magazine, Sorokin has stated that "[a]s a child I perceived violence as a sort of natural law. In the totalitarian Soviet Union, oppression held everything together. It was the sinister energy of our country. I had that sense by as early as kindergarten and grade school. Later on I wanted to understand why human beings are unable to do without violence. It's a mystery I haven't solved to this day. Yes, violence is my main theme." I think this bit of background is essential to any review of The Ice Trilogy.

Written as three separate volumes and sold as one book by NYRB, Ice Trilogy has an almost biblical story-line. Part 1, "Bro", starts off with what can be called the book's Genesis: the Tunguska Event. On June 30, one of the largest meteorites ever to enter the earth's atmosphere struck down in the middle of Siberia. Scientists have estimated that the blast hit Siberia with the same force as a 15-megaton nuclear blast. At the same time, and not coincidentally, Alexander (Sasha) Snegirev, the trilogy's Adam, was born to a well-off family. Sasha's quiet idyllic childhood and his family are shattered by World War I, the Russian Revolution(s), and the subsequent Civil War. Abandoned and alone, Sasha makes his way through to University and from there he gets himself seconded to an expedition to Siberia to search for the site of the meteor crash. It is in Siberia that Sasha meets his destiny. The meteor is made of ice and Sasha hurls himself upon it and finds `salvation'. The ice speaks to him. Every planet in the universe is composes of 23,000 rays of light. The earth was a mistake and as the planet evolved the peace and harmony of the planet was ruined by humans. Sasha, now known to himself as Bro, hears the ice tell him to find the remaining 22,999 rays of light lying dormant in human bodies and wake them up. Once awake the 23,000 brothers and sisters together can return the earth to its original condition. One can only be woken by being struck in the heart by ice from the meteor. The rest of Bro sets up the beginnings of this organization of heart seekers.

Part 2, "Ice" is also born in violence. This volume was released independently in 2007 and, in the interests of brevity; the reviews there provide a decent summary of this volume. See Ice (New York Review Books (Hardcover)) Part 3, 23,000, takes us to the possible fulfillment of the heart-seekers' mission of releasing the light.

I was entranced by the book for a number of reasons. Bro surprised me in that it is mostly set out as a straight-forward narrative. This is very unlike Sorokin's other work and I sometimes wondered if this were the same Sorokin. Bro is a bit slow to develop and this may disappoint some who like their `fantasy' to start off in high gear and stay that way. However, once Sorokin sets up his structure, and it takes most of Bro to do so, the book takes off in classic Sorokin fashion.

Volume 2, Ice, goes back to my original notion that there are biblical overtones to this trilogy. You can see Sorokin taking us through this particular looking glass darkly. Like many sects, religions, ideologies, and so on the heart seekers motives are pure. They speak of seeing the light and speaking the language of the heart. They speak of a utopian destiny in which all the sins of the earth, of humanity, are subject to a great cleansing. But at the same time we read with some horror (a horror brought on by a sense of familiarity) at how these seekers of light seek go about achieving their brand of nirvana. Driving ice stakes into the heart of every blond haired blue eyed person they can get their hands on, even though they know only one in millions is part of the 23,000 they are studiously unconcerned for who gets hurt. The fact that these truth seekers are quintessential Aryans is disturbing to say the least. Taking on upper-level positions with the KGB and SS allows them to operate with impunity while they go ahead with their divine mission even though this means they participate in all the horrors known to the world as the Gulag and the Holocaust. Seeing non-heart-speaking humans as merely `meat-machines' not worthy of consideration completes this picture. There is no analysis or question of the ends justifying the means. There is just "the ends". There is no earthly morality, just a divined and total amorality. Sorokin paints a very grim picture of the heart seeks and in so doing paints a pretty grim and I would say pretty accurate picture of those who see salvation (be it through Marx or Jesus) and care not a whit about the totalitarian impulses that drive them to brutal violence. Walt Kelly's character Pogo is famed for saying "we have met the enemy and he is us". Sorokin's Ice Trilogy takes this concept to its outer limits.

I've seen some reviews that compare Sorokin to Gogol and others to French-author Michel Houellebecq. I think that the comparison to Houellebecq is the more apt. They each do an excellent job of painting a grim picture of individuals and societies as an example of both moral and physical decay. Sorokin manages to explore these issues while at the same time telling a pretty exciting story that stands on its own as a well-written piece of fantasy. Grim though the undertones or message may be the story is far from dull. It was gripping and engaging.
The Ice Trilogy comes in at just under 700 pages. It didn't feel that long to me. It was well worth the investment and well worth reading. L. Fleisig


The Very Best Of Otis Redding
The Very Best Of Otis Redding
Price: £7.24

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It IS the Very Best of Otis !!, 27 Mar. 2011
How do you like your soul? Haunting and mournful? Otis does that - in Pain in My Heart and I've Been Loving You Too Long. Do you like it raw and powerful? Otis does that in Respect and Satisfaction. Love songs? Try My Lover's Prayer. When I first looked at the CD - I wondered why Dock of the Bay was not the last song. It just seemed fitting that the CD would close with Otis' posthumous hit. But I've Got Dreams to Remember serves, in my opinion, as a more apt closing track. We've got Otis to remember - and this CD does a great job of helping people discover and/or rediscover a remarkable talent.


Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim
Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim
Price: £5.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It whispers music to the weary spirit, 27 Mar. 2011
I purchased this album because the author (and Sinatra aficionado) Pete Hamill claimed in his book "Why Sinatra Matters" that it was one of Sinatra's best. Nevertheless I was skeptical because quite often a record producer or performer will get the idea that creating a `super group' or pairing two very talented musicians will create a record that is even greater than the sum of its parts. That usually doesn't happen. The usual result is one in which each `diva' takes a turn showcasing his or her talents. "Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim" is a rare and very pleasant exception. Although not a 50-50 blend, this album really showcases Sinatra performing the great Jobim's music, the result is virtually flawless.

Sinatra & Jobim was released during the height of Brasil's bossa nova invasion. Performers such as Jobim, Joao Gilberto and Astrud Gilberto, enjoyed tremendous influence on U.S. pop music and jazz. Stan Getz, Charlie Byrd, Ella Fitzgerald and others all absorbed or collaborated in the bossa nova boom. This album and the later "Sinatra and Company" mark Sinatra's footprint in the bossa nova genre.

The CD opens with an excellent cover of The Girl from Ipanema with Sinatra taking verses in English and Jobim in Portuguese. As others have noted, Sinatra's voice is quiet to the point of whispering. Those used to swing era Sinatra and his other full throttle vocals may find is quiet, spare renditions different to say the least. It happens to work in the context of this and other tracks such as Dindi, Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars and Meditation. Sinatra always had a great feel for interpreting a song and I think his approach to Jobim's songs is dead solid perfect. Similarly, the three non-Jobim songs arranged by the very talented Claus Ogerman, "Change Partners", "I Concentrate on You", and "Baubles, Bangles and Beads", fit in nicely with Jobim's in terms of the mood and the music.

All in all this is an excellent CD and is one that I often turn to when I want music to whisper to me instead of shout. Highly recommended.


The Definitive Collection & Timeless Love
The Definitive Collection & Timeless Love
Offered by stevecaptainkirk
Price: £14.90

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Yester Love to Timeless Love: Priceless Smokey, 27 Mar. 2011
Smokey Robinson really had a "hold on me" back in the day. Smokey Robinson was one of the pantheons of soul sensations that exploded onto the American music scene courtesy of Motown Records. Going to a Go Go, Second That Emotion, Tracks of My Tears, and Tears of a Clown were just a few of the hits that kept Smokey and the Miracles on top of the pop and soul charts in the 60s. Smokey's new CD, Timeless Love, is a look back but not to the 1960s. Rather, Smokey has gone back even further and put together of what may be called American standard love songs.

Other recording artists have tried this crossover before. Some, like Linda Ronstadt (What's New and Lush Life) and Willie Nelson (Stardust) have produced classics in their own right. Others, (Rod Stewart and Michael Bolton come to mind) have not been nearly as good in my opinion. Fortunately, Smokey has done exquisite justice to a group of wonderfully written love songs and has crafted a CD that can join Ronstadt and Nelson in my own must-have collection.

Smokey's choice of material is excellent. Cole Porter, the Gershwins, Jimmy Dorsey and Sammy Cahn are well represented here. He has not attempted to imitate those performers who have covered these songs before. Rather, he has stayed true to his own musical style and put his own imprint on them. At age 67 Smokey's range is still good and he can still hit the high notes I could never hit even when I was a boy soprano. Robinson shifts tempo and tone throughout the CD and those shifts create some surprising new takes on the songs. Robinson, for example, takes the temp down a notch in Our Love is Here to Stay and in doing so makes the song sound more intimate than I recall in earlier versions. He does something similar in Tea for Two, a song that I never particularly cared for in its upbeat (happier sounding) presentation and adds a layer of wistful longing that I haven't heard in earlier covers.

Although the orchestration here is excellent the centerpiece of the CD is Robinson's singing and the lyrics and music. This stands in some contrast to Ronstadt's Lush Life and What's New in which Nelson Riddle's arrangements shared center-stage with Ronstadt's vocal interpretations but both Ronstadt's and Robinson's choices in that regard resulted in a great performance.

So, if you are a fan of Smokey Robinson, a fan of classic standards, or simply want a CD that you put on when you want to put the lights down low and set a cozy romantic setting for a night in with your `significant other', Robinson's Timeless Love is as good a place to start as any other.


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