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Gregory S. Buzwell "bagpuss007" (London)
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A Case of Hysteria (Dora) (Oxford World's Classics)
A Case of Hysteria (Dora) (Oxford World's Classics)
by Sigmund Freud
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 31 July 2013
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These days, as we stumble onwards into the 21st century, it's difficult to imagine just how ground breaking psychoanalysis must have seemed when Freud first began publishing his work. We take psychoanalysis for granted now, and we all fancy ourselves able to discern the underlying meanings and causes lurking behind the conversations and actions of our close friends and family. Wind things back just over a century however and we would have had a very different set of skills with which to analyse and untangle the behaviour of those around us.

A young girl suffering from breathlessness, coughing, a habit of telling tales about a male family friend (or is she rather telling the truth?) and a weariness regarding life is brought to Freud for treatment. Over the course of the next few months he listens to her story, analyses her dreams and begins to piece together the root causes for her physical and emotional maladies. A Case of Hysteria, more commonly known as the Dora Case, reads like a novella - 100 pages of family intrigue, telling symbolism and brilliant character analysis. It's difficult to keep in mind that the events portrayed are largely real - although that's one of Freud's points: how 'real' are events related by a sometimes unwilling patient who is repressing some memories and unconsciously filling occasional gaps in her recollection of events with false memories all interpreted by a man with a limited knowledge of the wider family picture and using an often controversial form of analysis? Add to this the detail that Freud wrote up his case notes after the patient had left (taking notes at the time of the sessions would have, understandably, put his patient off somewhat) and we're clearly moving ever further away from concrete, incontrovertible, unarguable fact. As Dora tells her story, and as Freud adds his layers of interpretation, the 'genuinely real' and the 'believed to be real' perhaps do not always occupy the same space. But that is largely the point.

The Dora Case is fascinating on many levels. It tells us a lot about Freud's brilliant methods of analysis and it tells us a great deal about the attitudes of the time (for example Freud, not surprisingly given the social structure of the era in which he lived, tends to see the men in Dora's tale as largely respectable and reliable while the women, including Dora herself, he regards as more prone to flights of fancy). It's an interesting book, and interesting as much for the story it relates as it is for Freud's insights into the human psyche. Recommended.


The Dark Half
The Dark Half
by Stephen King
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Pulp Horror, 6 July 2013
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This review is from: The Dark Half (Paperback)
The Dark Half is, appropriately enough given its subject matter, one of those novels where the author's life and the author's work overlap. Stephen King published a few early books under the name Richard Bachman and then, when the secret was out, he 'retired' Bachman from service. In The Dark Half novelist Thad Beaumont publishes literary works under his own name and violent pulp thrillers under the name George Stark. When a needy lowlife stumbles across the secret Thad decides to kill Stark off anyway and avoid the possibility of blackmail but the trouble is Stark refuses to stay dead.

I think the premise behind The Dark Half is about as good as a horror novel can ever hope to have - a respected novelist with a wife, kids and a comfortable lifestyle in staid middle-class America who finds himself pursued and threatened by a violent alter ego who really shouldn't exist. I sense King had great fun with the idea himself and the result is a fantastically over the top homage to Jekyll and Hyde and The Picture of Dorian Gray on the one hand and the pulp EC Comics - notably the Tales from the Crypt series from the mid-1950s - on the other. The tag-line for the novel is 'George Stark. Not a very nice guy' and Stark's insane murder spree as he bumps off interfering cops, nosy journalists and literary publishers before targeting Thad and his wife is as accomplished and unpleasant a piece of pulp noir writing as you'll ever find. It's to the book's benefit that even though Stark is an abomination it's impossible not to have a sneaking admiration for him. He may have no right to exist but having crawled into reality from the dark-side of an author's imagination he's going to have a damn good stab at staying there.

I'd argue that King has written deeper and more complex novels (It, The Stand and The Shining to name but three) but he hasn't written many in possession of a greater narrative drive than The Dark Half. George Stark is a terrific creation - there's something almost Terminator-like about his ability to target and take-out his victims - and the way he physically decays over time is a nice touch and a great means of adding another layer of visceral horror to the story. Similarly the way King has his lead characters investigate the nature of fiction, the weaving of fact and experience into stories and the means by which the process of writing is carried out from initial idea to final draft is fascinating. It's a good book about an individual nightmare made manifest. George Stark. Not a nice guy .... You can say that again.


Selected Poems (Oxford World's Classics)
Selected Poems (Oxford World's Classics)
by John Wilmot Earl of Rochester
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Love and Life, 29 Jun. 2013
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John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester, has a reputation (quite deservedly so, as it happens) for writing extremely racy verse. Schoolboys throughout the ages have delighted in his poem 'On Mrs Willis', which contains a reference to male genitalia in its first line and female genitalia in its last while holding up to the light and examining all sorts of shabby vulgarity and bawdiness in the lines between. It is, even to a 21st-century eye remarkably crude but it is also, and this is what saves it, genuinely very funny. This leads to the second point that needs to be made about Rochester - namely that he was a truly excellent poet with a peculiar gift for making the crudest of comments in the most perversely beautiful and witty of fashions . For example, just to name one of his strengths, few if any writers in English have been better at the rhyming couplet than Wilmot.

The reign of Charles II was not noted for its shy and retiring ways but, even in an age awash with lewdness the Earl of Rochester rather stood out as perhaps the most brilliantly dissolute individual of all. The introduction to the new Oxford Classics selection of Wilmot's poetry puts the man, and his behaviour with all its excess and brilliance, within the context of the times. As ever to understand the writer it is necessary to understand the age in which he or she lived and this the introduction to the volume does superbly well. Better still, however, the volume gives readers the chance to own a scholarly and very reasonably priced edition of some of Rochester's finest poems. When it comes to brilliant, entertaining bawdiness the Earl of Rochester really was in a class of his own. A true original, and a poet to cherish.


Salem's Lot
Salem's Lot
by Stephen King
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Horror, 23 Jun. 2013
This review is from: Salem's Lot (Paperback)
Salem's Lot, Stephen King's second published novel, is a tale of small town America being assailed by supernatural evil. It is also the book, I would argue, that first showcased so many of the characteristics and themes that came to typify King's best qualities as a writer - in particular his ability to propel a story onwards at a pitch-perfect pace; his ability to create believable characters and, perhaps best of all, his gifts for writing on a grand scale.

The novel begins in a very low-key fashion. Characters are introduced, foremost among them being Ben Mears a successful author simultaneously escaping his recent past and returning to his childhood home, and Susan Norton, the all-American girl trying to escape the constraints of small-town life. And then King does something brilliant - he introduces the town itself. A working day in the life of 'salem's Lot is portrayed with all its quirks and peculiarities, its oddball characters, its sleazy ordinariness of furtive affairs, petty crimes and lazy policemen on the one hand and its respectable hard-working doctors and inspirational teachers on the other. The good, the bad and the ugly of small-town America is laid bare and quietly brooding over it all on its distant hilltop is the Marston House, complete with its mysterious new occupants - the creepy Mr Straker and the never-seen Mr Barlow. Once the scene has been set King slowly introduces the weirdness - a dog is brutally killed and a child disappears, and then amidst outbreaks of a flu-like illness, strange tales begin to circulate about vampires.

'Salem's Lot has been described as Peyton Place meets Dracula: a weird intermeshing of slightly sleazy small-town drama with supernatural horror. As a shorthand description of the book it's not bad but it doesn't really do King justice. In the hands of a lesser writer the novel could have come across as faintly daft but King carries it all off with aplomb. You genuinely believe that this sleepy little town with its ordinary inhabitants is slowly being reduced to a haunted landscape of supernatural nightmares. Some of the set-pieces are striking: - a corpse coming back to life on the undertaker's table, for example; a vampire writhing and blistering in the sunlight, or a school bus being infested by Nosferatu-like schoolchildren. Also, and this is a great strength of the book, it is in no way predictable. The good guys don't always make it back into the light and some of the worst atrocities are inflicted by people, not vampires.

I first read Stephen King back in the mid-eighties, racing through perhaps a dozen novels and collections of short stories in as many weeks. But then as university and adulthood loomed I moved on to other things and other authors. Recently, though, I've got back into King's work and it has been a revelation. Of course he can tell a great story - that has never been in doubt - but he is also a genuinely accomplished and talented writer, one who can handle a large cast of characters and make pertinent observations about American life ('salem's Lot has a lot of interesting things to say about sleepy Nowheresville towns in the US). Back in the 80s 'salem's Lot was the first King novel I read and, having just reread it thirty years on, I still think it's a fine novel. Big sales and decent writing, as 'salem's Lot proves, can go together. Recommended.


Joyland (Hard Case Crime) (Hard Case Crime Novels)
Joyland (Hard Case Crime) (Hard Case Crime Novels)
by Stephen King
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'The last good time', 16 Jun. 2013
There is, at the best of times, something a touch sleazy and a bit creepy about funfairs. The Joyland of the title is a 1970s funfair, independently run and fighting a losing battle against the big corporations, in which Devin Jones gains a summer job in order to earn a little money and, more importantly, to make the pain of a broken heart fade away in the bustle of new adventures. While there he makes new friends, learns quite a bit about himself and gets to play Howie the Happy Hound (the park mascot and, as is mentioned in the story, a bit of a nod and a wink to Scooby Doo - the best-loved Scooby Doo story was, after all, the one set in a 'haunted' funfair). Devin also becomes intrigued by a real life ghost story - the spectral presence of a murdered girl said to make occasional appearances at the Horror House, the parks only 'dark ride'. Add to the mix a Gothic Victorian mansion that Devin passes of a morning and the beautiful woman and her wheelchair-bound son who sit out on the lawn; a fortune teller who knows more than she should and a repeated meditation on the idea of good things happening for 'the last time' and you have all the ingredients for a mesmerising tale.

Joyland is quite a difficult book to categorise. On one level it's a detective story (who killed Linda Gray, the girl whose ghost haunts the funfair?); on another it's a tale of the supernatural (Linda's isn't the only supernatural presence - second-sight abounds in more than one character) and on a third it's a coming of age novel (will Devin's broken heart be healed by the beautiful Erin Cook who works at the funfair or by the beguiling mother of the ill child, or simply by the passage of time and the inescapable mess of experience and daily life?). King, like the great story teller he is, takes time to develop his characters and he makes you care about them so when the dark clouds gather (this is a Stephen King novel - of course the dark clouds gather) you have a direct emotional engagement as events unfold. You come to like the characters, you care about them.

The novel is just over 280 pages long and it rattles forwards at a terrific pace. All the same I restricted myself to reading just fifty or so pages a day because I didn't want the experience to flash by too quickly. There are plenty of themes to explore - the inevitable pain of a broken heart (we've all been there); the growing sense that maybe life will carry on even after the loved one has walked into the sunset with somebody else (we've all been there too, eventually); the gaining of new friends and the realisation that there really are more things in Heaven and Earth .... Stephen King is one of those rare authors who can pace a narrative to perfection. Just like the Joyland funfair he describes the book contains fast rides, slow rides, thrilling rides and scary rides and King knows how to carry them off like a true professional. Joyland is an entertaining, moving and memorable read. Up there with the great man's very best.


Vathek 2/e (Oxford World's Classics)
Vathek 2/e (Oxford World's Classics)
by William Beckford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oriental Gothic, 14 Jun. 2013
William Beckford was an interesting character. Wealthy, flamboyant, frequently mired in scandal, the genius (or lunatic) behind the architecturally improbable Fonthill Abbey and the author of one of the first Gothic novels - Vathek, which was first published in 1786. Vathek took many of the typical themes of the Gothic novel such as the desire to provoke feelings of awe and wonder in the reader, not to mention the thrill of terror, and added a colourful twist in the form of a beautifully described oriental setting. The story itself is a variation on the Faustian tale in which the Giaour, an unpleasant-looking supernatural being with streaked green teeth, promises the tyrannical Caliph Vathek a sight of his awe-inspiring underground kingdom in return for, amongst other things, the sacrifice of the fifty most beautiful youths in the Caliph's dominions. The deal is sealed, and Vathek's wilful march to damnation begins.

What sets the novel apart from so much early Gothic fiction is not only its use of an oriental setting but rather the quality of the writing. Beckford wrote his book in French so as to set it apart from the tawdry pieces written in vulgar English. The French text was then translated, under Beckford's watchful eye, by Samuel Henley. Between them the two men ended up with a very elegant short English novel. In particular the descriptions of the strange events such as Vathek's witch-like mother burning noxious substances at the top of a tower in order to please the Giaour have a dream-like intensity. Similarly humour is used to lighten the mood such as when the beautiful and nubile Nouronihar runs rings around one of Vathek's elderly and dusty advisors. The whole work is an endlessly surprising mix of the surreal, the weird, the exotic, the playful and, ultimately, the horrifying.

The most famous part of the book is the conclusion with its description of the Giaour's subterranean palace of Eblis. It's a nightmarish and yet strangely beautiful creation - like something from a fevered opium dream and reading the account of Vathek's tour through the halls and environs you can easily see why the book held such a fascination for people such as Byron. It's a sublime piece of work. All in all I thoroughly enjoyed Vathek. It is written in a more elegant prose style than much of the Gothic fiction that had gone before and it uses its beautiful and terrifying landscapes to great effect. It has panache and verve and, at times, I was reminded of some of Coleridge's more vivid and feverish poetry. It's sublime and awe-inspiring in equal measure - exactly what a good Gothic novel should be.


The A303: Highway to the Sun
The A303: Highway to the Sun
by Tom Fort
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars On the Road, 9 Jun. 2013
Tom Fort's 'A303' is a curious book. On one level it's a simple hymn to a particular and quintessentially English road but, on another, it's an exploration into landscape, history, myth and, of all things, successive government failures to devise and implement a coherent policy towards roads and transport. The way the book ranges across so many different subjects is part of its charm, but it also makes it an occasionally frustrating read. Every twenty pages or so you'll come across something absolutely fascinating but, like an interesting view at the side of a road, the book will frequently zoom past it all too quickly. For example Fort writes at one point about the site of Fonthill Abbey - an improbable Gothic pile built by the deliciously eccentric William Beckford - but no sooner does the story become interesting than we're off, shooting further down the road to look at something else.

Where the book is good, however, is when Fort lets fly with his own personal opinions on something. He has a lot to say about the ubiquitous Little Chef restaurants dotted along the A303; and he has a good eye for the quaint pub selling decent food and a fine pint but it's when he has a dash at the lumbering policies of successive governments towards transport that he's at his best. No government of any colour comes out of this at all well and as Fort travels down the A303 he uses the ill-conceived / never built / promised but not delivered town bypasses and road-widenings to validate his arguments. Just as the route of the A303 acts as a shorthand for a particular strand of English history then so it also acts as a reminder of broken promises by politicians of all parties. Stonehenge, of course, features large in the account - a focus for all that is sublime about the landscape and all that is wrong about the way we look after it.

In conclusion if you travel regularly on the A303 then Fort's account is well worth a look. He's great at pointing out the strange buildings and odd stories lurking within a few miles of the road as it winds down towards Devon. In particular, on a personal level, Alfred's Tower near Stourhead looks well worth a look the next time I'm passing; as does Montacute House and the little breakfast bar at the end of the road. The pairing of the A303 and the people who delight in travelling along it constitutes a very English love affair and Tom Fort has produced a very English book to go with it. Light, lyrical, a touch bright and breezy perhaps but great fun and informative all the same. Recommended.


The Chill (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Chill (Penguin Modern Classics)
by Ross Macdonald
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Twisted Genius, 2 Jun. 2013
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Ross Macdonald's crime novels featuring the private detective Lew Archer tend to follow a pattern. There is usually, somewhere in the mix, a wayward son or daughter traumatised by the seedy behaviour of their parents. Similarly there is often a doctor - sometimes good and sometimes not - who knows more about events than he lets on. Finally there is nearly always a murder far in the past that has a bearing on present day events. These themes are all present and correct in The Chill and yet the familiarity doesn't matter at all - Macdonald's prose and his eye for character never once, in my experience, let him down and there are enough fresh twists and turns in The Chill to make it one of his finest novels.

The book begins with a mysterious case of a missing bride. Archer soon tracks her down but in the process he finds himself thrown into the murky world of American academia and campus politics with snooty lecturers, frustrated tutors and a whole snake pit of seething rivalries and passions. In particular Archer finds himself involved in the frustrated world of Helen Haggerty, a new lecturer with an opaque past into which it is possibly best not to look too closely. Threats have been made to Haggerty's life but Archer doesn't take them especially seriously. But then, not long after, events unfold that prove him disastrously wrong.

The Chill seems to occupy something of a curious place in the ranks of Macdonald's novels. It's frequently cited as the best of the lot and yet, to other readers, it's regarded as over-complex and implausible. True, the plot is deeply twisted (in the best possible sense of the word) and it folds over upon itself in fascinating and elaborate ways but while the ending was (to me at least) massively unexpected Macdonald does play fair with his readers. The clues are all there - I just didn't see them coming and recognise their significance at the time. Besides, I would argue that the real beauty of the Lew Archer books lies not so much in the plots as in the character of Archer himself - always hopeful of finding decent qualities in people in spite of years spent disentangling their shabby, selfish behaviour - and in Macdonald's prose. There are hard-boiled noir lines in the Archer books that Chandler would have envied: 'The front of her blouse curved out over her desk like a spinnaker going downwind', for example, may not win any prizes for political correctness, but it's a perfect example of a prose style that was just made for 1950s and 1960s down-at-heel American detective fiction with its ice-blondes and spivs and low-life crooks. I've read quite a few of the Macdonald Lew Archer series now and they have all been superb - ideal reading to take your mind off the pressures of work and the routine of daily life. The Chill, I'd say, is right up there with the best in the series. Recommended.


Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other Writings n/e (Oxford World's Classics)
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and Other Writings n/e (Oxford World's Classics)
by Thomas De Quincey
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bliss and Oblivion, 27 May 2013
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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, first published in 1821, lurks behind an impressive array of authors, novels and autobiographies that to one degree or another owe it a debt of gratitude. The link between drug use and creativity is now a well-trodden path (think of all those books about The Beatles and the change in their output between, say, With the Beatles and The White Album as the experimentation with various Category A substances took hold) but De Quincey got there first, and he did it as well as anyone.

Confessions is a book which splits into two components. In the first half De Quincey tells of his escape from school (his rebellious streak was there from an early stage) and his subsequent life on the road or else holed up in London. He meets interesting people, he befriends prostitutes (who seem, as is probably the way of these things, a whole lot more likeable and interesting than the men who frequent them) and he slowly and haphazardly moves on in life. Then, in the second part, we get his by turns blissful and nightmarish encounters with opium. Opium, in the form of laudanum, was the drug of choice for the Romantics and the Victorians and the step between 'used for medicinal purposes' and 'addicted' was all too easy to make. I suspect much of Coleridge's output, for example, owes some of its other-worldly quality to laudanum and a few years further on many of Wilkie Collins's novels clearly owe a debt to a spot of artificial creative enhancement. De Quincy, however, addresses the subject head on. It isn't the brilliant creative side effects that form the subject of his book but rather the reality of day to day opium addiction itself. Initially De Quincey finds the experience of opium taking delightful; it allows some of the freedom from one's own personality granted by alcohol but with a much greater clarity of mind: everything becomes clearer, brighter, more vivid. Ultimately however there is a price to pay in the form of massive lethargy on the one hand and some horrific visions on the other. At one point De Quincey describes a scene in which he feels as though he is bobbing about in a sea of heads - a literal endless grey ocean of chattering, gibbering human heads - an image Dante would have been delighted with when describing the inner circles of hell. De Quincey survived his addiction and had the intelligence to make sense of it all. Many others were neither so fortunate nor so gifted. The Confessions are certainly cautionary, but he doesn't shy away from the initial bliss of the experience. He describes opium taking as a very dangerous, but very beautiful two-sided coin.

The Oxford edition also contains two other pieces - Suspiria de Profundis (an extension and reworking of Confessions) and The English Mail-Coach (an odd, discursive but brilliant piece on, among other things, grief and reflection) as well as an excellent introduction to De Quincey and his work. The notes at the back of the volume are useful too. De Quincey was ferociously intelligent and barely a page passes in the Confessions without a Biblical reference or a dash of Greek or Latin. Without the notes I for one would have been lost. In conclusion Confessions of an English Opium-Eater is an important book, and one which has a lasting influence not just on literature but on the whole human artistic and creative process as enhanced, disturbed or destroyed by mind-altering substances.


The Aspern Papers and Other Stories n/e (Oxford World's Classics)
The Aspern Papers and Other Stories n/e (Oxford World's Classics)
by Henry James
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Art and the Artist, 19 May 2013
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For Henry James the act of writing was very much an artistic endeavour: the tale was one thing but the manner in which it was told and the ability of the prose to capture nuance and sensation was just as important. The four tales in this volume all deal with the relationship between an author and those who read and admire his work and in each one it becomes difficult to divorce James the author from the story being revealed; the divide between the tale and the teller becoming blurred and opaque.

The most famous tale included here, The Aspern Papers, is perhaps the best. A nameless narrator tracks down an elderly woman, once the lover of the famous American poet Jeffrey Aspern, and her niece in a secluded area of Venice. The narrator believes, although without absolute proof, that the woman has in her possession letters from the poet and in an attempt to obtain them he becomes a lodger in the crumbling palazzo, at first behaving like a perfect guest but always on the search for the elusive letters and always ready to stoop to any depths - including toying with the affections of the reclusive niece - in order to obtain them. The story is a fascinating meditation on the nature of fame, desire, obsession and deceit. The narrator, someone who is at heart a good man, becomes blind to the consequences for those around him of his all consuming passion to discover the letters. In addition to the human element the story also contains many beautiful descriptions of Venice with its endless reflections of the sunlight from the water and its air of fading grandeur. In his later work James pared down his descriptions and concentrated fully on capturing the emotions and thought-processes of his characters but here he creates gorgeous impressionist pictures ranging from the views across St Mark's Square to the bouquets of flowers the narrator presents to the painfully shy young girl he, albeit for his own purposes, befriends.

The other stories in the volume - The Death of the Lion, The Figure in the Carpet and The Birthplace - all address different aspects of literary fame. The Figure in the Carpet, for example, focuses upon a critic and his intense search to discover the secret of a particular novelist's greatness. Close readings of the novels and discussions with the author only lead the critic into ever greater spirals of tortured mental endeavour and anguish. The Birthplace meanwhile tells of a couple who look after the birthplace of the nation's greatest poet (never named but clearly Shakespeare), guiding the tourists through the rooms but always aware that the dramatist only really exists in his work, and not in the physical location where he was born and raised.

Henry James is an elusive author. His later works (of which The Birthplace is one) can be subtle to the point of obscurity while earlier tales such as The Aspern Papers reveal him to be - at his best - perhaps the most elegant prose stylist in the language. If you're new to Henry James then The Aspern Papers is an excellent place to start. The other stories in the volume (particularly the excellent The Figure in the Carpet) make for an delightful bonus.


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