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AJ Ward (UK)
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iPhone 6s Screen Protector, JETech 2-Pack [3D Touch Compatible] Premium Tempered Glass Screen Protector Film for Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s Newest Model 4.7
iPhone 6s Screen Protector, JETech 2-Pack [3D Touch Compatible] Premium Tempered Glass Screen Protector Film for Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s Newest Model 4.7
Offered by JEDirect UK
Price: £5.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not really suitable for iPhone 6s, 10 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The screen protector isn't quite wide enough for an iPhone 6s. We're talking a fraction of a millimetre, but it means that when you look at the phone side-on you can see that, on either side, the product isn't covering everything that lights up. It also doesn't cover a lot of the glass at the top and bottom of the screen, but as per other reviews that's probably because of the phone's rounded edges.

Also, the dust removal sticker supplied with the product isn't the full size of the screen (looks to be about the size of the previous generation phone) so is pretty useless.

The instructions should tell you to have the phone screen lit for application, because if you don't and you just line it up with the lock button / earpiece holes chances are a tiny slither of the lit screen will be left totally exposed. I ended up using both protectors because once you've committed and got one stuck it will never go on again without an air bubble in the corner you pealed it from.

The product edge is quite raised from the screen, and I wonder if it might catch on pocket edges.

I bought this product after seeing it's high rating. It appealed to me because it was a good price and includes two protectors - even with the best of these sorts of products I know that air bubbles can be a problem, or user error in applying them, so I like to have at least two chances at getting it right. I'm sure it has a high rating for a reason but if you have an iPhone 6s the chances are you'll find yourself disappointed.


Transition
Transition
by Iain Banks
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Transition, 18 July 2012
This review is from: Transition (Paperback)
I re-read this book recently after getting to thinking I must have missed something the first time round. The central idea of the novel is ambitious and impressive, dealing with multiple characters across a myriad of realities (the "many worlds"). Tackling the multiverse was never going to be easy, and I'm surprised by some of this novel's brighter reviews in the national press.

The page-to-page experience of the novel is generally a good one. Banks is an excellent writer, and there are some brilliant pieces of description and ideas. The characters, however, are not well formed. Adrian Cubbish is the worst of these. He's from up north but has set himself the challenge of playing a barrow-boy-banker. The sections of the book written from his viewpoint are the most stereotypical and predictable. Lots of "know what I mean?" and "But I was the golden boy, wasn't I?"

Although the central theme is impressive, the plot doesn't hold together in the slightest. Ideas are set out and then rubbished, and the `rules' that seem to apply to those with the ability to transition between the many worlds are all eventually forgotten, giving way to a confusing narrative where anything is possible (which makes for very dull storytelling).

This comes to a head towards the end of the novel, which has set up the premise that to visit an alternative reality there must be human bodies there which travellers can take up as hosts. Two of the main characters visit a world where an accident caused by a "gamma-ray burster" left the planet "devoid of humans". The visitors seem to have use of human bodies whilst they are there, but there is no explanation as to how. Similarly, just after setting up the premise, the central character hypothesises about transitioning into mid-air from an aeroplane and falling to his death: impossible, unless transitioned into the body of a skydiver intent on suicide. For this to happen to him there would have to be someone in mid-air over the Atlantic for him to take up as a host. These and similar inconsistencies make the whole thing a bit of a waste of time.

The novel's many worlds and characters could have been interesting. Indeed, some of the ideas continue to intrigue me. Banks sets up a great premise, and then explores about four percent of it. The inadequate characters, of which there are so many, are under explored. They never visit or come across alternative versions of themselves (wouldn't you be tempted?) and it's never quite clear what happens to host minds when they are displaced, or the original bodies of the travellers when they are left unattended (we know they are functional, but seem to lack personality - they are described as "husks" but seem to look after themselves, therefore retaining an identity (character) of some kind that isn't acknowledged). In a book with so many characters, it would be nice if some had approached the subject matter, and the central plot points of the novel, from a few more angles.


The End Specialist
The End Specialist
by Drew Magary
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3.0 out of 5 stars The End Specialist (The Postmortal), 15 May 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The End Specialist (Paperback)
The premise of this book is an exciting one. Magary's concept of a dystopic world where everyone has the potential to live forever after a cure for aging is developed is rich in its potential.

The novel starts off well: I admired the initial set up of blog / diary entries, and the non-fiction feel to it. The main characters eventual occupation (End Specialist) is a choice one, and the story moves quickly over a number of years. The implications of over-population are explored in scenes which are reminiscent of Harry Harrison's Make Room! Make Room! (Penguin Modern Classics)

However, the concept is not manipulated successfully, and the novel gives too much page space to clunky dialogue, questionable decisions made by the protagonist and descriptions of the world I can describe only as `blokey'. (Someone else pointed out that women only exist as an extension of men.)

I won't talk about the things that I most took issue with: there are two of them, and to they happen quite late on. However, I will mention that there are a fair few typos (well, missing words in the middle of sentences) that tripped me up here and there. In fact, an overall lack of attention to detail and consistency, particularly in the novel's third section.

In his acknowledgements Magary mentions, seemingly with some surprise, that Byrd Leavell of the Waxman Agency read his book four times. "I can't read any book four times," he says, "even if one of them happens to be my own." I hope for his sake that he was joking - The End Specialist would have benefitted from a couple more redrafts before it hit the shelves.


The Godless Boys
The Godless Boys
by Naomi Wood
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A writer to watch..., 16 May 2011
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This review is from: The Godless Boys (Paperback)
Naomi Wood is a talented new voice. Set in a richly conceived world, this debut novel is one of immense power. Wood cuts to the bone of the story - it is about the people, the environment - and she doesn't get distracted by the complexities of her alternate history.


The Invention of Everything Else
The Invention of Everything Else
by Samantha Hunt
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Difficult to get into..., 17 Jun. 2009
I'm usually a quick reader, but it took some time for me to finish this book. The upsides are the poetic language and unique description; the downside is a story that is a bit something of nothing. The novel tries hard to be quirky, ending up being slightly confusing. I started reading on a long train journey and got about halfway through, after that I struggled to pick it up again and read the remainder of the novel in ten page bursts. I thought the ending might redeem some of the earlier confusion, but it does not. I had read that people who like 'The Time Traveller's Wife' will like this, however, apart from the time travel theme, I can draw very few parallels and was a little disapointed.


The Hour I First Believed
The Hour I First Believed
by Wally Lamb
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Strong but lengthy, 27 May 2009
This is a lovely book that - if you've got some time to spare - is well worth reading. The story of Caelum Quirk and his extraordinary family is an eye opener, and there are some really delicate moments that have stayed with me long since. Contemporary issues (gun violence, the criminal justice system, spirituality) are dealt with with tact and prowess and a real empathy is allowed to develop between the reader and the central character.

However, I've only given it three stars. This is for a number of reasons. Firstly, the book is very long, perhaps uneccessarily so. From page one it goes into great detail on so many things, some of them trivial. This is stylistic, and fine until the last few pages, where numerous momentous events are summarised. It's as if what Lamb could have made into an 200 extra pages of story is paraphrased into about 5 - I'm not saying there should be 200 extra pages, but it feels as though there is a lack of consistency in the weight of detail placed on certain events. The ending lacks something for me. Perhaps I'm a slow reader, but I felt like I'd invested a lot of time into reading the book for it to kind of fizzle out. It's a theme led, rather than plot led, story.

Secondly, there were some annoying punctuation issues that I found distracting. Lamb has a habit of using question marks at the end of sentences that are not questions. A lot of this, if not all of it, happens in speech and I understand that he is trying to get across a particular way of talking. However, I found it tripped me up as I read - it's a bit like someone speaking with an upward inflection on the end of every sentence. Also, there is an overuse of italics which dictate the places where the reader should place emphasis. I found this a bit controlling, even patronising.


Engleby
Engleby
by Sebastian Faulks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading, perhaps, 18 May 2009
This review is from: Engleby (Paperback)
'Engleby' is a predictable, overcomplicated novel. The story is told from the perspective of Mike Engleby, who starts out as an undergraduate at Cambridge university and later becomes a journalist. The blurb tells us "with the disappearance of Jennifer ... the story turns into a mystery of gripping power". For me, it takes too long for the novel to reach the point when Jennifer disappears, and when she finally does I was relieved that something had actually happened. The mystery really isn't much of a mystery either, when the narrator has admitted early on that he has suspicious gaps in his memory.

The disappearance of Jen, the main storyline, isn't strong enough to keep the novel engaging, although the interesting outlook of Mike encouraged me to keep turning pages. The novel offers much insight into the mind of the sometimes interesting, sometimes dull main character and provides an excellent example of an unreliable narrator. The trouble is that we know he is unreliable from the first page. We keep waiting for a twist that will shock us or surprise us, but, alas, it never comes.

Some of the topics the novel talks about are really appealing, although many are over explored. The nature of memory and its bearing on what is and isn't real was an interesting one for me, and something which is explored to just the right degree. Much of the story is filled with unnecessary, over explained description and very little dialogue. The central character is built up beautifully, in the style of Ian McEwan, and we occasionally find ourselves caught up in his world.


The Handbook of Written English
The Handbook of Written English
by John G. Taylor
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A neccessity, 24 Jan. 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Anyone who needs to write whether it is as part of their job or as a student, needs this book. It's set out as a reference guide but there are some interesting things to learn just by flicking through. Taylor surprises us by rationalising those things, as writers, we come to trust our instincts for. Putting into words the things you never think about. Continue to trust your instincts and when you're stuck, trust this book.


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