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Don't Tread on Me: Anti-Americanism Abroad
Don't Tread on Me: Anti-Americanism Abroad
by Carol Gould
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 12 Dec. 2009
This is a 21st century J'Accuse against the growth in anti-Americanism and its vile, incestuous sibling - antisemitism. The book is so much more than that, though. It is also a personal celebration of all that is great about America and Americans, a charge-sheet against the hypocrisy and envy that underpins the prejudice against them and a personal journal of a brave, plucky woman in strange times.

I think what I enjoyed most about Don't Tread On me is that Carol is not content to merely disprove the lies about American people. She goes to the next stage and proudly celebrates their pluckiness, their work ethic and all the other qualities that make them such a great people. I've read countless American non-fiction and fiction books but this is the one that in my opinion best captures the admirable spirit of the people. Informative, entertaining and above all damn right, it is a brilliant read.


Saving Israel: How the Jewish People Can Win a War That May Never End
Saving Israel: How the Jewish People Can Win a War That May Never End
by Daniel Gordis
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.99

8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An important and powerful book, 3 Mar. 2009
Saving Israel is not like any previous Gordis book. Though he has lost none of his thoughtful eloquence, here is a more direct, steadfast Daniel Gordis than we encountered in his previous tomes.

Gordis has no illusions about the many threats to its future that Israel faces. However, he shows that much of what needs to be done to save it from those threats can be done internally by Israelis themselves. Israelis, he believes, need to reconnect with the original purpose of the Jewish state in order to guarantee the state's future. He passionately restates that purpose and vividly re-evokes the pioneering spirit that took the dream of Zionism and turned it into reality. He's on breathtaking form in these passages as he laments the `withering of Zionist passion' and shows how it can be - and must be - reawakened.

Then he turns to the issue of Israeli Arabs and the more steadfast Gordis begins to show his hand. He addresses the issue with humanity, but also unflinching honesty. When he turns to the many external threats to Israel's future, Gordis is again admirably frank. He shows once and for all the true intentions of Israel's enemies and then powerfully shows why - contrary to the views of some diaspora Jews - winning and fighting wars is not antithetical to Judaism. Sweeping deftly through Jewish history, this chapter is overwhelmingly powerful.

Much as I adored his previous books, there was an occasional tendency for hand-wringing in their pages. In Saving Israel, Gordis is far more partisan and route-one. This is not to say that he has lost any of his thoughtfulness and charm. Similarly, while this is a less personal book than his previous efforts, there are still some occasional insights into his family's life. (Once again, they leave you thinking: `Oooh, he sounds like such a great Dad!')

And such a great thinker, too. I hope this book is read very, very widely. Not only will those who take the time to read it be entertained, informed and inspired. They will also emerge from the experience all the more able to do what must be done to save the Jewish state and take it to new heights.

In one section of Saving Israel, Gordis calls for the reinvention of the `new Jew' of Zionism. Well, he walks it like he talks it. In this brilliant book we meet a new Daniel Gordis who has - in an entirely humane and appropriate way - taken the gloves off. Long may he spar.


The Raymond Delauney Emails
The Raymond Delauney Emails
by Raymond Delauney
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully funny and clever, 1 Oct. 2007
This is the funniest book I've read for many years. Raymond Delauney is a genius and a flipping hilarious one at that. Bravo.


House of Meetings
House of Meetings
by Martin Amis
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's sort of everything and nothing, isn't it?, 3 Jun. 2007
This review is from: House of Meetings (Hardcover)
Not his best effort but worth a look.


When I Lived in Modern Times
When I Lived in Modern Times
by Linda Grant
Edition: Paperback

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Loved it, 3 Jun. 2007
A great account of the birth of Israel with great characters and most of all a fantastic pace. Every page has a wonder of its own.


Israel: A History
Israel: A History
by Dr Martin Gilbert
Edition: Paperback

7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate account of a great nation, 3 Jun. 2007
This review is from: Israel: A History (Paperback)
Never before have I sped so quickly and enjoyably through such a dense history book.


The Emperor's Children
The Emperor's Children
by Claire Messud
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.53

2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping and brilliant, 3 Jun. 2007
This review is from: The Emperor's Children (Paperback)
This is one of the best novels I've read in years. The characters are fantastic and it all goes along at a nice pace. The ending is a slight letdown but I would heartily recommend this moving and engaging read.
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