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Rehso

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Landvo L200 5 Inch Andriod 4.2.2 Smartphone MTK6582W WIFI Quad Core 1.3 GHz 1G+8G 3G Cellphone Dual Cameras (8.0 Mega + 2.0 Mega) GPS Bluetooth FM Radio G-Sensor Browser YouTube (Black)
Landvo L200 5 Inch Andriod 4.2.2 Smartphone MTK6582W WIFI Quad Core 1.3 GHz 1G+8G 3G Cellphone Dual Cameras (8.0 Mega + 2.0 Mega) GPS Bluetooth FM Radio G-Sensor Browser YouTube (Black)

3.0 out of 5 stars Cheap, reasonable for the price, 17 Jun. 2015
It's cheap. It's reasonable for the price, but, don't expect it to last. The battery isn't good, and overheats (too small?), and the screen quickly starts to have drop-off and uneven results. I paid £90 for it, but now a lot less. Useful for a temporary mobile, or where you're afraid one might be lost, but beware of this mobile too. Camera was never good, and takes far too long to focus.


Lost in the Haveli: The tale of a trapped soul
Lost in the Haveli: The tale of a trapped soul
Price: £0.00

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent paranormal story about contemporary India, 27 April 2015
I must admit that I debated internally for a long time as to the right score for this book. The problem is that this book really needs good editing, and some expansion. Indeed, I found it frustrating because I yearned to learn more. Speaking with an experienced reviewer, she once pointed out that if you care about the characters then the writer has done a good job. Conversely, internally, I decided that I must review based upon what I read, not what the book could be. Simply put, some good editing, a slightly better ending, and some character expansion, not much really, and book would be, under my scoring, a 4 (above average). However, Amazon uses a more generous system, where 4 indicates like, rather than above above average.

Now for the shocker, this book, significantly expanded, with the points from above, has the potential to be a 5. As I rarely give 5, that can be taken as high accolade indeed. In truth, I really liked the book, and, seeing through the flaws, loved the story. Actually, with some changes, it could be nice film.

The story is basically told mostly in contemporary India, in a small village, with some reference to modern Britain, and some flashbacks to India pre-WWI. Lovely descriptions of Indian village life is given, and whilst one can't confirm that it's accurate, it certainly feels so, and as such, is a wonderful way to see what life is like there.

The story is basically that of a spirit who is confined to a small area, her family's mansion and the neighbouring village. Her existence has been stable for many years, until she befriends some people from the village. Slowly we begin to understand who she is, why she hasn't passed over, and secrets, whilst a chain of events are set off that will have profound consequences on many people.


The Men And The Girls
The Men And The Girls
by Joanna Trollope
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful tale of two couples in early 1990s Oxford, 7 April 2015
This review is from: The Men And The Girls (Paperback)
The story, from 1992, is that of two Oxford based couples, James & Kate, and Hugh & Julia. Both the men are around 60, both the women in their mid 30s. Life is content for all, but age is beginning to leave it's creeping mark. Into this mix two elements are thrown. For James it's a minor accident with a woman, Miss Bachelor, of approximately his own age; for Hugh it's the slow decline of his career on television.

As a novel, there is confidence in the writing. Trollope doesn't see the need to shock, or to jolt the story, to gain the readers attention, which so often is the way of writers unsure of themselves, and neither does she spend far too long on characterisations. It can be said that, for the most part, the book doesn't dwell too long on character build up, sans to emphasise a point, simply because we know these people. James, the semi-retired teacher and writer, who leads a comfortable life, for example, is someone who we can easily imagine. Of course, the characters do talk about themselves, and each other, which greatly aims in the understanding them, and their motives.

For a younger audience, the book might seem slightly alien. A central aspect is the telephone, which, for 1992 of course, is landline only. Quite a bit of the story would need to be re-written for 2015. Likewise, the description of driving, and indeed parking, in Oxford, would be risible today (Oxford is extremely anti-car, making parts of the story untenable, and indeed, untellable, today). Clearly too, American style food, seems slightly alien then, in a way it wouldn't be today.

I can highly recommend this book to both more mature readers, but with a historical context, to younger readers too.


Missing Gretyl: You Only Love Twice (comedy drama)
Missing Gretyl: You Only Love Twice (comedy drama)
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Frustratingly close to being very good, but needs more work, 31 Mar. 2015
I wanted to give this book more, in some ways it deserves a 4, but it just can't quite get there. The characters seem to move out of character sometimes, and the plot sometimes jumps too much. It also seems that the writer has just tried that little too hard. A slightly slower pace, with more development, would have helped this, and some loose threads kept more in order. It also does have the feel of a script. This then is the frustration, because it's close to being good, even very good. There are also some minor grammatical errors, which in one exchange in particular forced me to read it a few times, as, as written, didn't make sense.

Yet, for all that, the plot was mostly good, the key characters nicely drawn, with interesting scenarios, and some interesting scenes. Plenty of farts too, which is always fun!

I fully expect this work, with some editing, to be made into a rather good television comedy.


May it Please Your Lordship
May it Please Your Lordship
by Toby Potts
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A nice way to spend an afternoon, 29 Mar. 2015
A nice, light, and funny read, with some interesting insights into the legal world.The book basically consists of a series of legal confrontations, in the life of Toby Potts, from newly qualified as a barrister, to several years later. Aside from the occasional foray into his personal life, especially at the beginning, and increasingly after the middle, the rest is the life, apparently, of a barrister, one would guess, although undated, from a few decades past.


Hausfrau
Hausfrau
by Jill Alexander Essbaum
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.78

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grows into a unstoppable, masterful, work. Outstanding., 28 Mar. 2015
This review is from: Hausfrau (Hardcover)
I struggled initially with this book. The first third of the book I kept on reading out of determination, and with a feeling that Anna, the heroine of the book, is just someone I wish to kick up the rear end and say to get on with it. Yet, this book is like a basin being drained. At first nothing much seems to happen, but a gradual whirlpool grows, and then, before you know, you're sucked in, and everything spins around, and around. The plot twists around, and interest grows.

The story is that of Anna Benz, a housewife, from America, living in a small Swiss town, with her Swiss banker husband, her 3 children, and her mother-in-law nearby. The descriptions of Swiss life, and those of ex-pats, are interesting, and from friend's experience, accurate.

The language of the book is wonderful, although it requires some adjust. I must admit that at first I disliked it, with the disjointed effects it had, but once I had read a while I found that from annoying it turned into delightful. Indeed, I'd recommend skimming the start of the book again, once finished, for now the start seems to have the colour it initially missed.

I'm giving this book 5, on reflection, where I had intended initially to award 4. Re-reading the book, and seeing the colour at the start, and indeed, clues to the rest of the book, I realised what a masterful work this really is, and indeed, what depth is in it. The amount of work, and I suspect love, that is apparent, made me realise that this is a 5, and I'd highly recommend this book to anyone.

As an aside, I didn't find the sex scenes so frequent or descriptive as some say. Indeed, I found the descriptions of her daydreams of certain sex acts to be liberating, in that, it's not common to read a woman talking about such things, when clearly women do.


Me Blackberry Fool, You Apple Tart
Me Blackberry Fool, You Apple Tart
Price: £1.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not quite there, 28 Mar. 2015
This book is frustrating, simply because there is a semi-decent story buried in it, but the way it's told is just not conducive it being told. The book is in the form of email exchanges, with the exception of a few text exchanges, between two London women. This format is one that either can work brilliantly, or can fail, and in this instance, the latter is the case. The main reason is that the style of the exchanges simply isn't one that is used in emails, of which the length of each email is the biggest issue. Leaving that aside, all supporting characters seem to be flawed and the two main ones are simply doing their best, although to be fair, in email exchanges that can be case. The boyfriends are talked about in a way which makes you wonder why they're still the boyfriends, and the love interest is rather badly drawn, as a mix of two different people/professions it seems. The other issue with this book is that the author is clearly far more comfortable describing the life of the lawyer.

Yet, for all that, the book has some fine comic and interesting moments. The descriptions of the legal life are interesting, and I suspect accurate, and the comic moments are actually quite funny. It's for this reason I say that the book is has a potentially story which is buried in it.


Retribution
Retribution
by Richard Sotnick
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Good legal thriller, recommended, 16 Mar. 2015
This review is from: Retribution (Paperback)
The book started a bit slow, but many do, as the background is being set. However, it quickly picked up it skirts and began to run. The author at times gives more background on people than necessary, but actually, he stopped before going too far, and interrupting the flow. In style thus, the book reminded me of Leon Uris's classic: QB VII, crossed with a John Grisham, with a dollop of Tom Clancy for good measure. The pace is good, the plots are interesting and intriguing, and the twists are fun. The end scene is a cliche, but, as a famous director once said 'the story is told', and so the end is just a coda to tidy things up.

There some plot holes however, which is normal, as there is only so much that can be explained away, especially in such a complex subject matter. The author is also delightfully erudite, and I found his excursions into varied areas interesting. I also learned a lot about aspects of the legal system, which was delightful. For me, I'd have liked more of the legal story to have been told, that is, more writing set in the courtroom, as this part was fascinating.

In short, I'd recommend this book


New Zealand. A Practical Guide for Getting Around New Zealand (Second Edition) (Incredible World)
New Zealand. A Practical Guide for Getting Around New Zealand (Second Edition) (Incredible World)
Price: £0.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A personal and practical guide to a tour of NZ, 23 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The book is sub-titled a practical guide for getting around New Zealand. I think a better sub-title would be a a personal and practical guide. This doesn't detract from the book, and indeed, as Zemel says early on, this is meant as an adjunct to the usual guides (she quotes Lonely Planet as a good guide), not a replacement. This bit of refreshing honesty sets the tone for the book. The books deals with two subjects: firstly Zemel's advice to travellers, which is quite clearly based on personal experience; and secondly her trip itself. Both are nicely written, sans excess prose, and give you a nice insight into her travels and experiences. Much of the advice is of a nature that a friend might tell to another friend, and indeed, the tone is that of a friend offering advice about where to shop, sleep, eat, et al. This informal style is rather nice, and whilst the major guides deal wonderfully with the regular items, this is, as the writer says, meant to complement, not replace them. More importantly, being written in this style makes it easier to read cover to cover, rather than dipping in here and there.

I would therefore highly recommend this book for anyone thinking of a tour of New Zealand, even if some sections might be relevant for all.New Zealand's Stars Shine Brighter! A Practical Guide for Getting Around New Zealand (Incredible World)


Israel in The World: Changing Lives Through Innovation
Israel in The World: Changing Lives Through Innovation
by Douglas Davis
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Success upon success: the mouse takes on the world!, 22 Mar. 2005
At a time when Israel is still fighting for it's existance, along comes a book which dramtically shows how Israel has grown from a tiny country, with few natural resources into a world beater. It would shock many, especially those who are anti-Israel, to know just how dependant the world is on Israel. That's what this book does. It's not a dry read, but neither is it political.
Instead, in a style reminiscent of Reader's Digest, it shows how in field after field, Israel has developed new technologies which has made it top in that area. In some areas, it's so far ahead, that there is no competition. For example, cameras incorporated into pills, which as they pass through the body, take 50,000 images, giving doctors the ability to see inside the body.
In short, it's a patriotic flag waving exercise. For those who love Israel, it's an ability to smile, as they see the sucess of this little country. For those who take a broader interest in business and technology, there is much to learn about how to utilise a country's brainpower and the way things are going.
Comments on Israel come from Tony Blair, Bill Gates, Christopher 'Superman' Reeve, and Bill Clinton; with an introduction by Rupert Murdoch. Highly recommended!


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