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Angus Jenkinson "angusjenkinson" (Cambridgeshire, England)
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Spotlight
Spotlight
Dvd
Price: £6.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A subtle and compelling masterpiece about real-life horrors, 20 Sept. 2017
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This review is from: Spotlight (Amazon Video)
To fully appreciate this film I needed to absorb not only its filmic mastery but the deep pervasive horror it inexorably exposes without sensationalism. It is an extraordinary work of drama. There are people who say it is dull. I hope none were set up to do that, because of course the story exposes the decades long systematic coverup of a scandalous perversion. What makes it so bad is not just the scale, not just the life changing and often life-destroying pain and shame and confusion it tells of, but the fact that this was done with the knowledge and deliberate coverup of an institution dedicated to holiness and care. This leads a thoughtful person to questions that go to the heart of our society. We can find some comfort in the dedication not just to truth but to the full truth that this story tells. There are masterful performances, beautifully paced plotting, raw emotion, intelligence. I applaud the way raw violence is exposed to the surface so subtly by passionate care.

The Church has acknowledged at the highest levels that it was horribly wrong. But our world will have future large scale abuses of human trust and dignity in different fields and by different institutions and networks – we have them now I believe – and we need more of what the newspapermen did. This is why we need great investigative reporters with resources and not just internet mashups.The film brought a horror story to life.


Magic Trip
Magic Trip
Dvd
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Authentic, raw and mad, world-altering escapade, 15 Aug. 2017
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This review is from: Magic Trip (Amazon Video)
OK, so this is not polished flmt making but that makes it profoundly authentic and brilliant as a testament to an extraordinary turning moment. This is folk legend, dream evocation, radical protest, the mad house, bacchanals, human search, love, curiosity, discovery, stupidity and genius and it helped fire the western world for a generation. Ken Kesey a best selling novelist about a 'cuckoo nest' psychiatric hospital) gathers a prankster band to drive across America to the World Fair in a painted bus called Further, and the further represents where they got to on acid. If you wrote it as a novel, no-one would believe it.


resistance loop bands,XHIVAR fitness exercise latex bands Set Of 4 with Bag,Each band measures 11.8 x 2 inches, Suitable for P90x, crossfit, yoga, pilates
resistance loop bands,XHIVAR fitness exercise latex bands Set Of 4 with Bag,Each band measures 11.8 x 2 inches, Suitable for P90x, crossfit, yoga, pilates
Offered by XhivarDirect
Price: £5.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Well packaged and a good exercise form, 9 Aug. 2017
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The type of exercise is very good and these are convenient and well packaged, but I thought they would benefit from one that was stronger. You can however put two or three together if you need that


High Grade - USB 3.0 Cable for Western Digital / WD / Seagate / Clickfree / Toshiba / Samsung Portable Hard Drive - USB 3.0 A/Micro-B Cable - AAA Products® (0.5m)
High Grade - USB 3.0 Cable for Western Digital / WD / Seagate / Clickfree / Toshiba / Samsung Portable Hard Drive - USB 3.0 A/Micro-B Cable - AAA Products® (0.5m)
Offered by MACRO.SUPPLIER
Price: £5.29

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 9 Aug. 2017
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Good price and worked. Sometimes that is all you need to say


The Mythical Organisation
The Mythical Organisation
by Graham Galer
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Profoundly sensible and passionately insightful account of organisation life, 9 Aug. 2017
Splendidly intelligent, uniting cultural, literary and business outlooks to give a refreshingly generative explanation of organisation amidst the sea of empty pap in business literature. One sentence by Betty Sue Flowers in the Preface is worth the price of the book and the accounts of major organisations do what myth does, make sense in a deeper way. If you are interested in society, the contemporary world, how organisations work, leadership, the function of literature, the power of imagination, in a word, life, then it is a book worth reading.


The Great Passage
The Great Passage
Price: £3.98

4.0 out of 5 stars Pleasant, upbeat, story of the creation of a Japanese dictionary., 8 Aug. 2017
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This review is from: The Great Passage (Kindle Edition)
Did you know there are about twice as many words in the major Japanese dictionaries as in the Oxford English? Intelligent, enjoyably sentimental, upbeat fictional narration of the creation of an exceptional Japanese dictionary. There were interesting sides to Japanese life and if you like words so does the book, and its characters - who also like food, love, friendship and commitment.

(An aside: I am intrigued though by the postmodern view that idolises words not merely as the medium of thought but its substitute. It seems there is a blind spot to seeing thinking itself - in the novel and its underlying philosophy. The book exquisitely shows thinking happening, and yet it seems the author does not know that.)


On The Road
On The Road
Dvd
Price: £6.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Watchable film of a classic curious creative Beat novel., 8 Aug. 2017
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This review is from: On The Road (Amazon Video)
Kerouac's strange classic was typed on a long roll of paper so that he would not have to stop to change sheets but could stay in the drug- and alcohol-fueled buzz of his stream of creativity, a refashioned semi-fictional account of himself and a group of legendary beautiful/crazy beats - the cultural creatives of the time and pioneers of the forthcoming hippy age. One was the poet Allen Ginsberg. Another the alternative hero of the hippies, Neil Cassidy, whose quest was a zen-like, drug-assisted, search for deeper reality in the very present moment (see The Electric Kool Aid Acid Test, film and book). The lovers match them in zest and wit but have to resign themselves to the restless spirits of the men. Brilliantly intelligent, lovers of wine, moment and jazz, it's a story of journeys, the quintessential road trips that are poetic symbols of a search for life, and the film is a very watchable, often intelligent, visually effective version, a good period slice of post-war America looking for its soul


4 Do it Wiser ® Compatible XL Toner TN-241 TN-242 TN-245 TN-246 for Brother DCP 9015 9017 9020 9022 CDW | HL 3140 3142 CW | HL 3150 CDN | HL 3152 3170 3172 CDW | MFC 9130 9140 9142 CDN | MFC 9330 9332 9340 9342 CDW
4 Do it Wiser ® Compatible XL Toner TN-241 TN-242 TN-245 TN-246 for Brother DCP 9015 9017 9020 9022 CDW | HL 3140 3142 CW | HL 3150 CDN | HL 3152 3170 3172 CDW | MFC 9130 9140 9142 CDN | MFC 9330 9332 9340 9342 CDW
Offered by Do it Wiser UK
Price: £43.95

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good stuff at good price, 8 Aug. 2017
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Did a good job, cheap, no problems. Black is not the richest black but that might be the printer, I have bought it again after 6 months usage


The First Class Lessons and Mantras: The Michael School Meditative Path in Nineteen Steps
The First Class Lessons and Mantras: The Michael School Meditative Path in Nineteen Steps
by Steiner Rudolf Rudolf
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £33.59

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Powerful text: spoiled by a polemical editor, 2 July 2017
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My review argues that this potentially exceptional work has been editorially packaged in a way that delimits its value, and this for inaccurate and inappropriate polemical reasons. The review explains on the one hand why the book is not a casual read or even merely an interesting read for anyone so minded, and why on the other hand it is potentially of enormous value as we head into the problems of the 21st century. I suggest that the translation is uneven but not without value. The editorial omissions and commissions are a problem. My score reflects the ambiguity of the situation.

The practice of giving a single score for an item is convenient but is illustrative of the failure of modernist science. I would score the book differently depending on who I was speaking with. Overall, however, I think the editor, TH Mayer, does a disservice to the text by imposing his polemical views upon it. It is not I think the proper job of an editor to exclude content on the basis that he is taken a political stance on the subject. Mayer may say that he has placed the excised parts in an appendix but that decontextualises them, as well as altering what is left.

This is a doubly inappropriate action, because the logic of his decision is faulty. In the first instance, it is based on dubious premises and then the logic of his argument does not stand up. It would probably not be interesting to many readers of this review how and why this is the case. Let me first turn to the book itself and then a brief comment can be made.

The value in this book lies in its extraordinary content, which is a verbatim transcript of a series of 19 lectures that embed various meditational verses, or mantrams (or mantras), with commentary on how to work with them. They represent a practical philosophical work that offers a practice in the development and cultivation of thinking, emotional development and conscious, free intentionality. In the process, they lead to an alternative post-modern, postformal experience of reality and the cosmos. In this sense, it is a landmark experiment and social text whose contents anticipate and go beyond many of the developments of the last century, such as phenomenology, Whitehead's process theology, post-modernism, cybernetic epistemology and Delouzian philosophy.

As it is said that a fish does not know that it swims in water, so it can be difficult for a person to become aware of just how immersed they are in the cultural milieu and worldview of their time and place. The modernist epistemology that dominated science since about 1600 has been breaking down during the 20th century, but still retains its force in contemporary culture, as for example in the belief that a numerical measurement is not only simpler but more valuable than a qualitative measurement. Throughout the last century, one figure after another – whether they are artists like Picasso and the obstructionists, scientists such as the quantum theorists and Bateson, social revolutionaries like Martin Luther King, or philosophers – have energetically encouraged revolutions in what and how we think, an epistemological revolution, with practical consequences. With its own unique style and approach, this work belongs to this tradition and has the potential, I would argue, to be the most explosively powerful because it is by far and away the most radical recasting of the cosmic ecology as an interwoven enterprise of being. But to go into that is beyond the scope of this review.

Steiner intended this text to be reserved for those people who would be capable of understanding the nature of its design. Moreover, they would be those who had reached a point in their lives where they were committed to trying to make a deeper sense of themselves in the universe. This is by no means a casual read and it is not even a serious thoughtful read. It is a guide towards some years of practice, at the least. It is in fact the centrepiece of an institution that Steiner founded for the cultivation of a more contemporary research and discourses across many fields (different sciences, sociology, medicine, the arts, ecological farming, education…) with this work as the transdisciplinary educational core.

The effectiveness of the education will depend on the energy and disposition of the scholar. However, I can testify that it can lead to remarkable outcomes. Every fresh science or worldview is the outcome of a specific myopia being healed. Essentially, certain specific aspects of the world are simply invisible to those who have not learned to see them. An example most people will get is the way farming and industrial processes have wrecked much of the ecological environment and brought about species holocaust out of a blindness to the consequences. The schooling of this course leads at the end to a transdisciplinary capacity to see what modernist science was blind to. It also arrives at a place where the text itself is revealed to be quite other from what it first appears. It has a kind of surreal quality who’s meaning only appears after its significance has penetrated, thoroughly. That is why Steiner discouraged entering into the path without serious intent to see it through.

Mayer takes the view that that this experimental institution became defunct and therefore that all references to it should be removed from the text. Were he to do so for purely editorial reasons (such as an edited collection of philosopher or scientists work), that would be one thing. But his reasons are political. The institution that Steiner founded still formally exists and has various discipline leaders. No doubt it has not accomplished what its founder hoped for, but it is not been without value. The Steiner schools’ movement is the largest independent schools’ group in the world, biodynamic farming is gaining increasing traction in a world more conscious of ecological crisis, and there have been notable achievements in other disciplines. But Mayer thinks it should not exist and seems to have taken umbrage against its continuation. A pity.

Mayer's alternative view is that individuals should work with the text alone or by passing it on to each other. But for the reasons implicit in what I have already said, this should really be an individual enterprise in a social context, for the world of the cosmos is a social world, one in which as an individual I am inseparable from all being and beings, and cultivating this is part of the practice.

The translation I would say is uneven. In some cases, it better preserves the straightforwardness of the German original compared with alternative versions, but this sometimes tips into banality, particularly in the translation of the verses. Overall, it is a useful additional resource for those committed to this work. It is conveniently sized and well-priced considering the scope of what is there. The editorial content at the end is of mixed value and in some cases, I believe, downright incorrect (not just in the polemical stance that Mayer takes). For example, I am sceptical about his explanation of the Guardian, the guiding figure of conscience and self-awareness in the negotiation of cosmic reality.


When the Earth Nearly Died: Compelling Evidence of a Catastrophic World Change 9500 B.C.
When the Earth Nearly Died: Compelling Evidence of a Catastrophic World Change 9500 B.C.
by D.S. Allan
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended: astonishing quality of research with extraordinary results, 1 July 2017
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When I first read this book some 20 years ago, I was more astonished by the quality of the research than the extraordinary results. An important aspect of my research over the years is the way in which people convince themselves of facts that turn out not to be fact, yet have the power to sweep communities, indeed the world. This is a basic principle of the history and philosophy of science and it helps to explain how bad theories become dominant or, in one of my special fields, unhelpful management practices become dominant. This extraordinarily intelligent book sets out to reveal one of these unfounded beliefs.

It does an excellent job of calling into question, and possibly demolishing, one of the most powerful theories of contemporary evolution, geology, and world history, the ice age. And it does this not by wild assertion but by patient accumulation and organisation of a vast range of scientific research, often recovering earlier records commonly disregarded in contemporary science, and cross-referring and building across a very wide range of scientific disciplines.

As a brilliant example of patient research, bold thinking and careful argument, this book is really a must read for any thoughtful individual. The very least it will do is bring you to the point of questioning blind assumptions. In a period in which fake news based on hearsay evidence or none at all is much in the news, When the Earth Nearly Died offers a very different diet. Strongly recommended.

In another tone, and with a different angle of view, interested readers in this work would also value some of the essays and ideas of Owen Barfield, first in the history of human consciousness in relationship to language (Poetic Diction: A Study in Meaning) and on epistemology – considering the models and constructs of knowledge that we use (Saving the Appearances: A Study in Idolatry. In particular he demolishes the assumption that a description of the world that depends on evolutionary events can be used to describe the world before those evolutionary events took place.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 1, 2017 12:15 PM BST


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