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Angus Jenkinson "angusjenkinson" (Cambridgeshire, England)
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End of Secrets
End of Secrets
Price: £3.98

3.0 out of 5 stars Pacy conspiracy thriller with satisfactory illusion of intelligence, 13 Jun. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: End of Secrets (Kindle Edition)
I was interested in the idea of a big data conspiracy, why not? The novel suggests enough to give the illusion of plausibility while focusing on a fast read with no substantive intelligence to slow you down. Slick.


The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin Modern Classics)
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A painful, soaring testament, 2 May 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Audible version is a good partner. The Kindle version behaves. The novel is one of the great morally imaginative, passionately concerned, literary treats of the twentieth century. Evocative in symbolism, down to earth as a clod of earth, gripping as a child's trusting hand, it's road journey is also a heart journey, a painful, soaring testament to humanity's flaws and foibles, but also its creative love and courage through the microcosm of a family. Those interested in Sheld organising companies will appreciate the (inspired by real life) example of the US refugee camp. Those concerned for the refugee crisis of today will see this US migrant story as a paradigm for comparison. And for anyone it may be a resource to carry in your own life journey.


The Good Italian
The Good Italian
by Stephen Burke
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.58

4.0 out of 5 stars Good Italian in colonial Africa, 7 Mar. 2016
This review is from: The Good Italian (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This engaging novel explores the moral and practical dilemmas of an Italian harbourmaster, Enzo, in colonial Eritrea challenged by the effects of Mussolini's fascist aspirations. He lives alone in white middle-class educated society until his friend recommends that he takes a live-in African cook, a housekeeper to look after the house, with benefits! The sexual and social delicacies, ethical clumsiness and counter power play between Enzo and Aatifa, the housekeeper he chooses, are beautifully negotiated. The situation becomes complicated when this (rather common practice at the time) is declared illegal because it contravenes Mussolini's fascist view that should there should be no relationship between Whites and Blacks. Enzo fails to rid himself of Aatifa, and tries to keep her presence secret: inevitably, the secret relationship is discovered, and we see into both rural native and occupying white societies and individuals.

This is a fine poetic work, which lets us look not only into an historical colonial period but into our own hearts.


Fotga AF Four Thirds M43 lens to Olympus Micro 4/3 Adapter replacement for DMW-MA1 MMF-1 MMF-2 MMF3
Fotga AF Four Thirds M43 lens to Olympus Micro 4/3 Adapter replacement for DMW-MA1 MMF-1 MMF-2 MMF3
Offered by Fotga
Price: £18.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seems equivalent to the official, 30 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This has been working better or as well as the official Olympus adapter which I also bought. You will probably find more hunting and slower automatic focusing than with native lenses


Panasonic Panasonic Lens Mount Adaptor for 4/3 System Lenses
Panasonic Panasonic Lens Mount Adaptor for 4/3 System Lenses

1.0 out of 5 stars This particular vendor's stock did not work., 8 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The review given by another person of the dmw-ma1 lens adapter is I am sure fine but this particular version, which is remarkably cheap, does not function. Or at least the version I received. I already have a Fotga electronic adapter, which is a cheap adapter – and I am not sure how they got around the patent restrictions that Olympus have. Anyway it functions except slowly. So I thought I would pay for the proper adapter in order to get the highly responsive automatic capabilities that should be available between M4/3 and 4/3. Unfortunately it did not work at all. Using it on a Panasonic GH4R, the camera was unable to recognise or detect the lens at all. I have therefore sent it back.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 3, 2016 11:02 PM BST


SENSITIVE CHAOS. The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air. Preface by Jacques Cousteau. Rudolf Steiner Press. 01/09/2008.
SENSITIVE CHAOS. The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air. Preface by Jacques Cousteau. Rudolf Steiner Press. 01/09/2008.
by Theodor SCHWENK
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone with an interest in life, ecology or nature, 2 Jan. 2016
I would absolutely recommend you to get this book, but probably not this edition, at least not without checking with the sellers what they are actually selling. There are several editions about all of which are good and the book itself is about 17 stars. You can also get a new one for about the same price.

Here is my review from another edition. Sensitive Chaos: The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
Sensitive Chaos has been esteemed for decades as one of the pioneer works in the ecology of water, which will be one of the most vital issues of the 21st-century, worldwide. Droughts, flooding, water shortages and political crises, smarter ways to deal with pollution and the very dynamics of water as a constituent of life and organism will be affected by our understanding of water, its behaviour and characteristics in the ecology of the planet. Sensitive Chaos is not just important but beautiful. As such it has been a sensitive introduction that has illuminated the minds of many around the world. At the time of reviewing, some first editions are available at almost £3000.) Think of Theodore Schwenk as a cross between ecologist, physicist, chemist, artist, activist and prophet. He may come to do for water what John Muir did for forests and trees.

It is a marvellous book to browse, study, dip into, return to, carry with you, and makes a wonderful present to anyone from young teenagers to still-interested elders. There are newer editions available, but the difference is primary in the cover and price.

The best concept for penetrating Schwenk’s understanding of water is to think of water as alive. We have all seen dead water: dank, dull, unable to sustain life, polluted. And we have seen the sparkling fresh mountain streams (with any luck). This is a good entry into understanding the life of water, but as you penetrate more deeply the idea of life becomes ever richer. Not only is water a basis of all life (it is the primary chemical and functional component of each of our bodies), it is also the moving spirit of the ecology of the planet. There are for example great rivers of water flowing through the atmosphere (one across the Atlantic with as much water as the Amazon River). Its peculiarity of freezing into forms lighter than the unfrozen water enables life to be sustained in rivers, seas and ponds through freezing winters as the ice sheets themselves form a barrier to the greater cold in the air. Moreover, water already has some of the essential self-organising characteristics of life, demonstrable in a laboratory.

Schwenk brought a precise phenomenological observation to the seeing of water, i.e. to seeing how it behaved, what it did and its inner dynamics. As an example, why does water meander across a flat plain and what has this got to do with the fact that in a gravity free space (like space), it forms globes? The answer is that the two have a great deal to do with each other and in turn with the movement of currents along a watercourse, cyclic convection currents, which influence the distribution of temperature through a body of water, and the very dynamics of cells, blood circulation and weather systems. The delight of the book is not merely that you discover the secrets but that you learn to start looking.

While the book represents deep science, this is probably not science as you have known it. It is accompanied by beautiful and sensitive drawings illustrating the dynamics of water. The aesthetics involved in this are not accidental. Schwenk belongs to the Goethean tradition that considers the qualitative aspect of phenomena of great importance in the understanding of science. It is not enough for example to turn colours into numbers or to treat symmetry as a bilateral formula. The symmetry of the body is implicated in the experience of beauty but it is also of profound scientific significance. Thus the flowing curving movements of water represent activities belonging to the very nature of water that are vitally important to the formation of life and to the creation of life-giving ecologies and environments. It is no accident that designers of furniture office have turned to creating curved desks, chairs and tables. Qualities also involve relationships: to experience the quality of something is to build a relationship with it rather than simply externalise it as "an objective number". It is rather clear that many of the ecological crises come down to the failure to build a relational understanding of the world: how the different life forms interact and living multidimensional coupled relationships, and we with them.

This kind of science generates empathy and appreciation along with understanding. For those who are engaged with chaos theory, fractals, complexity science, cybernetics, and so forth, this will be an illuminating read giving another perspective and way of penetrating into the dynamics of so-called complex systems.

Schwenk outlines practical programmes for working with water based on this understanding. Water is become one of the most influential factors in the dealing with effluence and poisonous industrial waste as well as the run-off from industrial farming. Wonderful living systems have been designed and created that not only transform, purify and make water alive, they also produce wonderful economic output, fish and agricultural produce.


Sensitive Chaos: Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
Sensitive Chaos: Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
by Theodore Schwenk
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone with an interest in ecology or nature, 2 Jan. 2016
This particular edition is out of print, although it is a particularly fine cover. But the book itself is very much in print. Sensitive Chaos has been esteemed for decades as one of the pioneer works in the ecology of water, which will be one of the most vital issues of the 21st-century, worldwide. Droughts, flooding, water shortages and political crises, smarter ways to deal with pollution and the very dynamics of water as a constituent of life and organism will be affected by our understanding of water, its behaviour and characteristics in the ecology of the planet. Sensitive Chaos is not just important but beautiful. As such it has been a sensitive introduction that has illuminated the minds of many around the world. At the time of reviewing, some first editions are available at almost £3000.) Think of Theodore Schwenk as a cross between ecologist, physicist, chemist, artist, activist and prophet. He may come to do for water what John Muir did for forests and trees.

It is a marvellous book to browse, study, dip into, return to, carry with you, and makes a wonderful present to anyone from young teenagers to still-interested elders. There are newer editions available, but the difference is primary in the cover and price.

The best concept for penetrating Schwenk’s understanding of water is to think of water as alive. We have all seen dead water: dank, dull, unable to sustain life, polluted. And we have seen the sparkling fresh mountain streams (with any luck). This is a good entry into understanding the life of water, but as you penetrate more deeply the idea of life becomes ever richer. Not only is water a basis of all life (it is the primary chemical and functional component of each of our bodies), it is also the moving spirit of the ecology of the planet. There are for example great rivers of water flowing through the atmosphere (one across the Atlantic with as much water as the Amazon River). Its peculiarity of freezing into forms lighter than the unfrozen water enables life to be sustained in rivers, seas and ponds through freezing winters as the ice sheets themselves form a barrier to the greater cold in the air. Moreover, water already has some of the essential self-organising characteristics of life, demonstrable in a laboratory.

Schwenk brought a precise phenomenological observation to the seeing of water, i.e. to seeing how it behaved, what it did and its inner dynamics. As an example, why does water meander across a flat plain and what has this got to do with the fact that in a gravity free space (like space), it forms globes? The answer is that the two have a great deal to do with each other and in turn with the movement of currents along a watercourse, cyclic convection currents, which influence the distribution of temperature through a body of water, and the very dynamics of cells, blood circulation and weather systems. The delight of the book is not merely that you discover the secrets but that you learn to start looking.

While the book represents deep science, this is probably not science as you have known it. It is accompanied by beautiful and sensitive drawings illustrating the dynamics of water. The aesthetics involved in this are not accidental. Schwenk belongs to the Goethean tradition that considers the qualitative aspect of phenomena of great importance in the understanding of science. It is not enough for example to turn colours into numbers or to treat symmetry as a bilateral formula. The symmetry of the body is implicated in the experience of beauty but it is also of profound scientific significance. Thus the flowing curving movements of water represent activities belonging to the very nature of water that are vitally important to the formation of life and to the creation of life-giving ecologies and environments. It is no accident that designers of furniture office have turned to creating curved desks, chairs and tables. Qualities also involve relationships: to experience the quality of something is to build a relationship with it rather than simply externalise it as "an objective number". It is rather clear that many of the ecological crises come down to the failure to build a relational understanding of the world: how the different life forms interact and living multidimensional coupled relationships, and we with them.

This kind of science generates empathy and appreciation along with understanding. For those who are engaged with chaos theory, fractals, complexity science, cybernetics, and so forth, this will be an illuminating read giving another perspective and way of penetrating into the dynamics of so-called complex systems.

Schwenk outlines practical programmes for working with water based on this understanding. Water is become one of the most influential factors in the dealing with effluence and poisonous industrial waste as well as the run-off from industrial farming. Wonderful living systems have been designed and created that not only transform, purify and make water alive, they also produce wonderful economic output, fish and agricultural produce.


Sensitive Chaos: Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air by Schwenk, Theodore Published by Rudolf Steiner Press (1996)
Sensitive Chaos: Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air by Schwenk, Theodore Published by Rudolf Steiner Press (1996)

5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone with an interest in ecology or nature, 2 Jan. 2016
Sensitive Chaos has been esteemed for decades as one of the pioneer works in the ecology of water, which will be one of the most vital issues of the 21st-century, worldwide. Droughts, flooding, water shortages and political crises, smarter ways to deal with pollution and the very dynamics of water as a constituent of life and organism will be affected by our understanding of water, its behaviour and characteristics in the ecology of the planet. Sensitive Chaos is not just important but beautiful. As such it has been a sensitive introduction that has illuminated the minds of many around the world. At the time of reviewing, some first editions are available at almost £3000.) Think of Theodore Schwenk as a cross between ecologist, physicist, chemist, artist, activist and prophet. He may come to do for water what John Muir did for forests and trees.

It is a marvellous book to browse, study, dip into, return to, carry with you, and makes a wonderful present to anyone from young teenagers to still-interested elders. There are newer editions available, but the difference is primary in the cover and price.

The best concept for penetrating Schwenk’s understanding of water is to think of water as alive. We have all seen dead water: dank, dull, unable to sustain life, polluted. And we have seen the sparkling fresh mountain streams (with any luck). This is a good entry into understanding the life of water, but as you penetrate more deeply the idea of life becomes ever richer. Not only is water a basis of all life (it is the primary chemical and functional component of each of our bodies), it is also the moving spirit of the ecology of the planet. There are for example great rivers of water flowing through the atmosphere (one across the Atlantic with as much water as the Amazon River). Its peculiarity of freezing into forms lighter than the unfrozen water enables life to be sustained in rivers, seas and ponds through freezing winters as the ice sheets themselves form a barrier to the greater cold in the air. Moreover, water already has some of the essential self-organising characteristics of life, demonstrable in a laboratory.

Schwenk brought a precise phenomenological observation to the seeing of water, i.e. to seeing how it behaved, what it did and its inner dynamics. As an example, why does water meander across a flat plain and what has this got to do with the fact that in a gravity free space (like space), it forms globes? The answer is that the two have a great deal to do with each other and in turn with the movement of currents along a watercourse, cyclic convection currents, which influence the distribution of temperature through a body of water, and the very dynamics of cells, blood circulation and weather systems. The delight of the book is not merely that you discover the secrets but that you learn to start looking.

While the book represents deep science, this is probably not science as you have known it. It is accompanied by beautiful and sensitive drawings illustrating the dynamics of water. The aesthetics involved in this are not accidental. Schwenk belongs to the Goethean tradition that considers the qualitative aspect of phenomena of great importance in the understanding of science. It is not enough for example to turn colours into numbers or to treat symmetry as a bilateral formula. The symmetry of the body is implicated in the experience of beauty but it is also of profound scientific significance. Thus the flowing curving movements of water represent activities belonging to the very nature of water that are vitally important to the formation of life and to the creation of life-giving ecologies and environments. It is no accident that designers of furniture office have turned to creating curved desks, chairs and tables. Qualities also involve relationships: to experience the quality of something is to build a relationship with it rather than simply externalise it as "an objective number". It is rather clear that many of the ecological crises come down to the failure to build a relational understanding of the world: how the different life forms interact and living multidimensional coupled relationships, and we with them.

This kind of science generates empathy and appreciation along with understanding. For those who are engaged with chaos theory, fractals, complexity science, cybernetics, and so forth, this will be an illuminating read giving another perspective and way of penetrating into the dynamics of so-called complex systems.

Schwenk outlines practical programmes for working with water based on this understanding. Water is become one of the most influential factors in the dealing with effluence and poisonous industrial waste as well as the run-off from industrial farming. Wonderful living systems have been designed and created that not only transform, purify and make water alive, they also produce wonderful economic output, fish and agricultural produce.


Sensitive Chaos: The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
Sensitive Chaos: The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
by Theodor Schwenk
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for anyone with an interest in life, ecology or nature, 2 Jan. 2016
Sensitive Chaos has been esteemed for decades as one of the pioneer works in the ecology of water, which will be one of the most vital issues of the 21st-century, worldwide. Droughts, flooding, water shortages and political crises, smarter ways to deal with pollution and the very dynamics of water as a constituent of life and organism will be affected by our understanding of water, its behaviour and characteristics in the ecology of the planet. Sensitive Chaos is not just important but beautiful. As such it has been a sensitive introduction that has illuminated the minds of many around the world. Think of Theodore Schwenk as a cross between ecologist, physicist, chemist, artist, activist and prophet. He may come to do for water what John Muir did for forests and trees.

It is a marvellous book to browse, study, dip into, return to, carry with you, and makes a wonderful present to anyone from young teenagers to still-interested elders.

The best concept for penetrating Schwenk’s understanding of water is to think of water as alive. We have all seen dead water: dank, dull, unable to sustain life, polluted. And we have seen the sparkling fresh mountain streams (with any luck). This is a good entry into understanding the life of water, but as you penetrate more deeply the idea of life becomes ever richer. Not only is water a basis of all life (it is the primary chemical and functional component of each of our bodies), it is also the moving spirit of the ecology of the planet. There are for example great rivers of water flowing through the atmosphere (one across the Atlantic with as much water as the Amazon River). Its peculiarity of freezing into forms lighter than the unfrozen water enables life to be sustained in rivers, seas and ponds through freezing winters as the ice sheets themselves form a barrier to the greater cold in the air. Moreover, water already has some of the essential self-organising characteristics of life, demonstrable in a laboratory.

Schwenk brought a precise phenomenological observation to the seeing of water, i.e. to seeing how it behaved, what it did and its inner dynamics. As an example, why does water meander across a flat plain and what has this got to do with the fact that in a gravity free space (like space), it forms globes? The answer is that the two have a great deal to do with each other and in turn with the movement of currents along a watercourse, cyclic convection currents, which influence the distribution of temperature through a body of water, and the very dynamics of cells, blood circulation and weather systems. The delight of the book is not merely that you discover the secrets but that you learn to start looking.

While the book represents deep science, this is probably not science as you have known it. It is accompanied by beautiful and sensitive drawings illustrating the dynamics of water. The aesthetics involved in this are not accidental. Schwenk belongs to the Goethean tradition that considers the qualitative aspect of phenomena of great importance in the understanding of science. It is not enough for example to turn colours into numbers or to treat symmetry as a bilateral formula. The symmetry of the body is implicated in the experience of beauty but it is also of profound scientific significance. Thus the flowing curving movements of water represent activities belonging to the very nature of water that are vitally important to the formation of life and to the creation of life-giving ecologies and environments. It is no accident that designers of furniture office have turned to creating curved desks, chairs and tables. Qualities also involve relationships: to experience the quality of something is to build a relationship with it rather than simply externalise it as "an objective number". It is rather clear that many of the ecological crises come down to the failure to build a relational understanding of the world: how the different life forms interact and living multidimensional coupled relationships, and we with them.

This kind of science generates empathy and appreciation along with understanding. For those who are engaged with chaos theory, fractals, complexity science, cybernetics, and so forth, this will be an illuminating read giving another perspective and way of penetrating into the dynamics of so-called complex systems.

Schwenk outlines practical programmes for working with water based on this understanding. Water is become one of the most influential factors in the dealing with effluence and poisonous industrial waste as well as the run-off from industrial farming. Wonderful living systems have been designed and created that not only transform, purify and make water alive, they also produce wonderful economic output, fish and agricultural produce.


SanDisk Extreme Pro SDXC UHS-U3 Memory Card
SanDisk Extreme Pro SDXC UHS-U3 Memory Card
Price: £31.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars It's a fine card but why pay 2x what is required?, 27 Dec. 2015
**This is for the 64GB card - the prices and and other comparisons vary according to the size.**
So why 2* for a card that so many people have raved over? Nothing wrong with what they are saying. This is a good card. It does the job fine. If you buy it for 4k video, or even the higher rated 200mb/s 1080p format on Panasonic GH4/R and the like, you should be happy. I have read around thoroughly and looked at various reviews and this seems robust. So, once again, why the low rating?

Simply because you can get a SD class U3 card (like this one) of comparable quality that you will be equally happy with for half the price, at least at the time of posting. Check out the Transcend 64GB Ultimate SDXC UHS Ultra High Speed Class 3 Memory Card and you will see i am right. (Other sizes than 64GB are also cheaper but the ratio changes).

So, maybe you look again at all those people rating it 5* and think - can they all be wrong? Well when you get one to the other card you will find almost as many rating it 5*. And if you read around among professional reviewers who have done technical and in-depth testing, the same is true. The Transcend is perfectly good.

Btw, I am not paid by Transcend, make no money, and have no axe to grind.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 4, 2016 2:02 PM GMT


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