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Profile for Angus Lamming > Reviews

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Angus Lamming

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Manx Brothers in Arms: World War I from a Father's Perspective
Manx Brothers in Arms: World War I from a Father's Perspective
Price: £2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars World War I, through the eyes of a Manx family, 1 Dec. 2016
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A great account of the First World War from before it started to the aftermath, all seen through the eyes of a Manx family as written in their numerous letters to each other. The Rev. John Quine's sons each enter the armed services and their differing accounts - the blood, the tears, the mud, and the fears - wonderfully illuminate the story of WW1. To date I have read many tales of the Great War told by historians, a few told from the viewpoint of a single man or woman, but never one seen through the eyes of a whole family, and Manx one at that. The Manx are a race apart, and fiercely proud of it! Julie Quine has made a great job of collating the family's letters into a highly readable saga. Strongly recommended!


Marlborough: Britain's Greatest General: England's Fragile Genius
Marlborough: Britain's Greatest General: England's Fragile Genius
by Richard Holmes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars First hundred pages turgid, 24 Aug. 2013
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Holmes' 'Wellington' was brilliant cover to cover. He is a gifted historian and comes across as eminently fair. Clearly he can tell a story well enough to delight, when he chooses to. His 'Marlborough' however is so stuffed with superfluous additional detail. I could barely read more than a page or two of the first hundred before falling asleep. We learn more about the various kings' love lives and about popular songs sung in Irish accents than we do about Marlborough's early battle plans and manoeuvres. Reaching one hundred and fifty pages into this book I decided the most interesting character by far was Marlborough's wife Sarah, yet Holmes goes into surprisingly little detail about her, preferring to tell us more about the promotion prospects of barely related characters and the lives of their assorted crust hunters than about Sarah's anguish at losing her firstborn child. The book comes across as a commentary that an eminent historian might babble about to a group of other eminent historians over cigars and brandy, the emphasis being more about what his mates might not know than about what the average armchair historian would really like to learn and be enthralled by.


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