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nzodiac (Kent, UK)

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The Ghosts of Blue Bell Hill & other Road Ghosts
The Ghosts of Blue Bell Hill & other Road Ghosts
by Sean Tudor
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally the truth can be told..., 3 May 2017
Finally it has been written; a book that once and for all delves oh so deeply into the mysteries of one of Britain's most haunted locations. I've had an interest in the 'ghosts' of Blue Bell Hill (a small, ancient settlement in Kent, England) since childhood and was always intrigued by the reputed tales of a phantom hitchhiker said to haunt the local lanes. But researcher Sean Tudor has gone a long way to methodically peel back the layers of this intriguing area and not only dispel the myths and dismiss the urban legends but actually prove that what really goes on on the hill is far stranger than any fiction.

There's no denying that allegedly true ghost stories have a staying power in some instances and this is usually due to the interference of newspapers who create sensational headlines, and in turn tales - often inaccurately spread as Chinese whispers. For several decades the rumours pertaining to a ghostly bride-to-be (or in some cases a phantom bridesmaid-to-be) can now finally be laid to rest as Sean puts over thirty years of research into book form. This book not only looks at the mystery of the pale female figure said to prowl the hill but also details numerous other spirit encounters in the area - but this is far from being a 'Most Haunted' type excursion for would-be ghost-hunters but a complex work which looks into ancient folklore, geology, mindset and science - ingredients often ignored by those all-too keen for a 'bump in the night' quick thrill.

'The Ghosts Of Blue Bell Hill' weighs in at over 500 pages - the notes alone proving to be a vital reference point for anyone who considers themselves a serious researcher - but Sean's ability to reveal to us the history of the hill - Neolithic occupation to road upheaval and grisly murders and other crimes etc, is fascinating as is his complex investigation into theories as to why the place appears to be ghost-infested. With so much previously unpublished material on offer, press errors corrected, creases ironed out and folklore examined; it could be argued that this book is the mother of all volumes pertaining to spectral jaywalkers, road spirits etc. It touches upon the likes of Resurrection Mary (Chicago) and others, attempting to connect the dots but always maintain that air of very eerie mystery.

Too many people over the years have jumped on the bandwagon of this mystery in claiming that the ghosts of the hill are victims of a crash that took place in 1965, but hopefully this book will be the final word on this baffling and often scary enigma. Forget the 'ghosts' of Pluckley; Blue Bell Hill remains not just Britain's, but one of the world's weirdest locations and Sean's brilliant work is testimony to that. This is a book sure to stand the test of time; a monolithic tome that has been a long time coming but boy was it worth the wait...and the weight!


Glimpses in the Twilight
Glimpses in the Twilight
by Lee Walker
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a fantastic book this is, 16 Nov. 2016
What a fantastic book this is; Lee Walker has always been one of the most descriptive, atmospheric and engaging authors within the Fortean world. His ability to evoke memories and describe settings is enough to warm the heart and shudder the spine, and with his new volume he's done it again; applying his emotion, enthusiasm and descriptive pen to a whole host of thrilling tales but what sets Lee's book apart from the usual local repetitive dregs is his talent for storytelling. Storytelling is a dying art; but there's enough here to keep numerous campfire audiences amazed, scared and joyed by yarns pertaining not just to the world of Forteana and urban legends, but his own reflections upon the city he loves (Liverpool) and growing up there. In today's climate it seems that anyone can write a book; but not just anyone can write a good book. And 'Glimpses...' is a very, very good book. Worth every penny, 'Glimpses...' is choc-a-bloc with enough timeless stories and strange accounts to last you a lifetime.


Haunted Highgate
Haunted Highgate
by Della Farrant
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highgate's darker side revealed..., 6 Jan. 2016
This review is from: Haunted Highgate (Paperback)
Finally, a book that delves not just into the truth behind the so-called Highgate 'vampire' panic but a volume which also covers other folkloric avenues within this antiquarian district. You'll never see those leafy suburbs in the same light when you read of the vast amount of murders, ghost stories and strange events - each one unravelled by Della Farrant as if one were reading some Gothic tapestry. With hauntings aplenty and high levels of strangeness all round; 'Haunted Highgate' is a volume for anyone with a morbid fascination for what really took place not just decades ago, but right up until today. Perfect reading by candlelight...


The Mystery Animals of the British Isles: Staffordshire
The Mystery Animals of the British Isles: Staffordshire
by Nick Redfern
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A strange adventure..., 2 Jan. 2014
The 'Mystery Animals of the British Isles' series from CFZ Press is an essential guide to all things monstrous and mysterious when it comes to Britain's oldest and weirdest counties. Whilst countless guide books may talks about essential tourist spots, or the best pubs, the 'Mystery Animals...' series focuses on all manner of oddities such as strange animal sightings, peculiar monsters said to roam specific woodlands, creature-infested marshes and other intriguing tales of escaped animals and animal lore. Nick Redfern and Glen Vaudrey look at many cases, many known, some unknown, in regards to Staffordshire's dark woodlands and dense undergrowth - from rumoured 'big cats' to ghastly, ghostly black dogs, plus as look at the mysterious Cannock Chase environs, this is a must-have book not just for locals, but anyone interested in the peculiar side of a county.


SEA SERPENT CARCASSES: Scotland - from The Stronsa Monster to Loch Ness
SEA SERPENT CARCASSES: Scotland - from The Stronsa Monster to Loch Ness
by Glen Vaudrey
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An intriguing insight..., 2 Jan. 2014
An intriguing book from the CFZ Press in which Glen Vaudrey looks at cases of possible sea serpent remains from those rugged coastlines of Scotland. Books like this are essential reading for anyone who may consider themselves a monster hunter, but those sceptics among you may also be pleased by the fact that Glen doesn't simply hail each piece of evidence as truly monstrous, and instead he looks at many cases where alleged monster remains have turned out to be nothing of the sort. This is an easy-to-read guidebook that may still leave us wondering why evidence seems to be lacking in support of sea serpents, but the CFZ have done a great job at publishing a book on a much ignored subject. Whatever your belief, the next time you're scanning those shores with your beady eyes, you may think again about that strange blubbery mass you just trod on!


Lizard Man: The True Story of the Bishopville Monster
Lizard Man: The True Story of the Bishopville Monster
by Lyle Blackburn
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Another monstrous read..., 2 Jan. 2014
After his fascinating 'The Beast of Boggy Creek' book, Lyle Blackburn has returned with another top-notch investigation, this time in search of the facts...and fiction, surrounding the alleged 'Lizardman' of Bishopville. Once again Lyle, and partner, take to the swamps in order to wade through a mystery that has long remained stagnant but like all good researchers Lyle peels back the layers to reveal that maybe, just maybe something strange did lurks in the murkier parts of Scape Ore Swamp, but also proves that at times the legend isn't all it's cracked up to be.

Whilst it's highly unlikely there ever was a scaly humanoid roaming the boggy bottoms of Bishopville, not all of the reports can be explained so easily, but it's also nice to read about the impact this alleged creature had on local tourism as well as reading about the newspaper headlines and eye-witness statements. Admittedly there is the occasional moment when the book loses itself, but it's always great when an author revisits an old story and sheds new light on it, so whether you are a fan of monster stories in general, or consider yourself a bit of a cryptozoological buff or sceptic, 'Lizard Man' is still a truly monstrous read.


Wildman!
Wildman!
by Nick Redfern
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book on things that should not be!, 14 Feb. 2013
This review is from: Wildman! (Paperback)
For centuries there have been sporadic reports in the wilds of Britain of strange, bipedal hair-covered beings, akin to the humanoid known as Bigfoot, often sighted in the Pacific Nortwhest. Although Britain harbours dense woodlands and ancient forest it has never been inhabited by any species of ape - so, what exactly are people seeing? Flesh and blood creature undiscovered by science? Hoaxers dressed up in gorilla suits? Paranormal manimals? Or something far weirder? Nick Redfern has written one of the most important cryptozoological and Fortean books of all time in 'Wildman,' because whilst books regarding American Bigfoot are two a penny nowadays, this quest is something altogetehr more unqiue as Nick delves into the archives, interviews witnesses, and trudges through some of Britain's most inhospitabale - and not so remote - wilds in search of a creature that simply cannot be. And yet the reports persist, a majority describing hulking ape-men with burning red eyes. These figures do not sound like your average monkey that has escaped from a zoo or circus , and yet Nick looks at these possibilities too with numerous cases pertaining to escapees from menageries and the like. Theories are put forward by several dedicated monster-hunters and zoologists as to what these manifestations could be, connecting such forms with age-old legends such as the Green Man, and the Woodwose of Medieval lore. It's as if folklore has come to life. Nick peels back the layers of these incredible mysteries, and covers all manner of surreal and frightening cases from places such as Cannock Chase in Staffordshire, Rendlesham Forest in Suffolk, and the Bolam Lake area of Northumberland where a group of witnesses claimed to have seen a hairy man-beast. No stone remains unturned in 'Wildman', so, if you don't know your Man-Monkey from you Shug-Monkey, then it's time to grab a torch and with stout heart venture into the deep, dark woods of British folklore, and let Nick Redfern be your guide. 'Wildman' is essential reading for any monster-hunter, ghost investigator, paranormal enthusiast, zoologist, cryptozoologist, historian and seeker of all things unnatural. Brace yourself for a hairy ride.


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5.0 out of 5 stars Rock n' roll for your soul, 24 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having been a fan of '80s metal, and also early '90s metal, the mid to late '90s and pretty much most of the 00s have been bereft of any true rock n' roll bands. Step forward The Last Vegas with their sweltering hot brand of sleazy rock n' roll that combies a lot of archetype rock n' roll - the result being quite a fiery package. If you like your music swaggering, your vocals spitting attitude, and your riffs juicy then this is an essential album. Vocally Chad Cherry comes across as a venemous mix of Brian Johnson (AC/DC) and Cinderella's Tom Keifer, and these guys know how to write a cool, infectiousw tune too. if anyone has a love for stuff like Buckcherry, Brides of Destruction, et al, then you should own this. If you like watered down corporate metal then look elsewhere...
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Quest for the Hexham Heads
Quest for the Hexham Heads
by Paul Screeton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An intrguing investigation into a seemingly weird case, 24 Jan. 2013
Thank goodness a book has finally been written in regards to the mystery of teh so-called 'Hexham Heads,' the only downpoint being the number of spelling errors within the book. Even so, Screeton still takes us on a journey into the surreal, the terrifying, the coincidental, and the downright normal as we meet a whole host of characters who almost seem as shifty as those in the board game 'Cluedo'! 'Quest for...' is a Fortean feast of fun and frolics, highly recommended.


The Ghosts of Chislehurst Caves
The Ghosts of Chislehurst Caves
by James Wilkinson
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting guide, 7 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Ghosts of Chislehurst Caves is a tad expensive for what it is - a nice little guide book (at just over 100 pages - page numbers would have been nice!) concerning the history and legends of the 20-mile stretch of man-made tunnels which wind beneath the borough of Bromley. Author James Wilkinson has clearly put a lot of effort into this volume, and like most local guide books it is essential to any historian, ghost-hunter, researcher and the like. I'd suggest visiting the caves first to get an idea of the stories and the layout of the place. Although a book in the caves gift shop is far more affordable, I'd still recommend this as it's written with a passion - clearly James knows his stuff and he's conducted some in-depth research involving eye witness interviews etc. Although the photographs showing alleged strange phenomena are extremely debatable, 'The Ghosts of Chislehurst Caves is recommended reading for the fireside.


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