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Vasileios S. Gavalas "gavalasv" (Greece)
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F. Scott Fitzgerald: All The Sad Young Men: v. 5 (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald)
F. Scott Fitzgerald: All The Sad Young Men: v. 5 (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald)
by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classical Fitzerald, 17 Dec. 2007
In this collection of short stories we can enjoy Fitzgerald at his best. The theme is similar in most of the stories but never stereotyped. Each of the sad young men has his own story to tell, which is always absorbing. Wealth, parties, courtship, carefree life, blissfulness. And behind all these, disaster is always ambushing. Just to remind us the vanity. To make us contemplate that money, success, love - and even happiness- can be vanished on the spur of the moment...
Moralists would condemn him. Feminists would hate him. Yet, the huge crowd of his followers adored him and the fact that, almost seventy years after his death, his writings gain more and more recognition attests to the greatness of Fitzerald's work.


Franny and Zooey
Franny and Zooey
by J. Salinger
Edition: Paperback

6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a touching story, 9 July 2004
This review is from: Franny and Zooey (Paperback)
In 1955, when this story refers to, Franny is 21 years old. She is the youngest child of a family of seven children. In 1955, however, only four of her siblings are alive. The eldest of the Glass children, Seymour, committed suicide while vacationing in Florida with his wife in 1948. The second-eldest child, who might be no other but the author himself, named Buddy, was "writer-in-residence" at a girls' junior college in upper New York State. The next-eldest of the children, Boo Boo, was married and the mother of three children at the time. In order of age, a pair of twins, Walt and Waker, came after Boo Boo. Walt had been killed approximately ten years ago in an explosion while he was with the Army of Occupation in Japan. Waker on the other hand, had refused to join the army in the Second World War and had been shut in a conscientious objectors' camp in Maryland. At the time our story takes place he was a Roman Catholic priest. The second youngest of the Glass children, Zooye, was five years older than Franny and by profession he was an actor.
In "Franny" Salinger addresses the issue of existential anxiety. Franny is a sensitive young person who seeks spiritual enlightenment and self realization in a world of phoniness and hypocrisy. Beyond the subtle and beautiful story of love Salinger takes the chance to make some cutting and brilliant observations about the emptiness and the lack of spirituality that our society is build on and the great difficulties that one has to confront if he/she doesn't conform to the society's way of thinking.


The Lady in the Lake (A Philip Marlowe Novel)
The Lady in the Lake (A Philip Marlowe Novel)
by Raymond Chandler
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply absorbing, 6 Feb. 2003
Philip Marlowe is hired by Derace Kinsley to find his young and reckless wife who has gone missing. From thereon the plot starts and the reader finds himself identified with the main character. Yet, The Lady in the Lake is not just a detective story, "une nouvelle noire". Chadler doesn't lose the chance to incorporate to his narration the poignant and sarcastic spirit of his hero, while himself mocks the morals of the American society of the 1940s from the point of view of an English romantic observer.


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