Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for mko > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by mko
Top Reviewer Ranking: 56,074
Helpful Votes: 164

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
mko "mko" (Poland)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8
pixel
The Myths of Innovation
The Myths of Innovation
Price: £8.69

5.0 out of 5 stars free yourself from prejudices, 26 July 2011
Scott takes you in a journey over the ideas you probably well known but was not aware of details. He goes though the history of innovation,
shows us some interesting examples and provides with entertainment. I lack better proven, well formed references thou - especially when it comes to Philosophy - I think Scott's analogies are to shallow in few places. On the other hand, this book should entertain you - it's obvious you will not get an answer how to create good idea. One of my teachers told us a joke once - how to build financial empire? Well it's simple, create popular product and logo - like Coca-Cola - and you are set. That's more or less the book is about. It shows how great inventions were created, how they were born and brought to us by inventors who were quite often rejected by others. Descrates wrote once: "it is necessary to reject everything that raises doubts in order to left only pure truth". I think, this idea remains somewhere in the background throughout all the book. If you really want to be outstanding person, you can't think like others do - you have to reject what you have been told, and do your things. Then, with little luck, you might become real inventor.


Head First Programming: A learner's guide to programming using the Python language
Head First Programming: A learner's guide to programming using the Python language
by David Griffiths
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars learn programming ;), 26 July 2011
I have read Head First series for quite some time. These books are just amazing. My first book was Head First Servlets and JSP and I liked the series from the very beginning. Now, I have few of them on my book shelf - I like the style of the series: well served knowledge. I know how to program and by reading Head First Programming I din't meant to actually learn programming - I wanted to get into Python. And I think, this is quite good way to achieve that. You not only get the idea of what programming is, you also learn basics of Python. This is a good start for people who have never used it. David and Paul go through all important topics for every beginner: branches, data structures, functions, file access, basic of the GUI and much, much more.

The way book is organized is very similar to other titles from Head First series. Authors utilize recent concepts related to cognitive science - not only what, but also how is important. By introducing image based explanations (we humans base our cognition on pictures) and by explaining everything with very basic language (authors are not afraid that avoiding academic fuss will make them look "less competent") David and Paul go straight into what is most important - knowledge presented such way, that everybody can learn it. I know people who doesn't like this series - they assume that books like these are simply silly. They have right to think that way. In my opinion, Head First Programming is as good as other titles from Head First series, and if you want to lear Python and learn how to program - you have to buy it.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 17, 2014 3:05 PM BST


Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Think (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly))
Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Think (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly))
Price: £21.84

3.0 out of 5 stars get know how to code in elegant way, 26 July 2011
Andy and Greg collected quite impressive set of IT related essays and enclosed them within Beautiful Code. These are the texts that refer to various topics and treat them in a hard, engineering way. There is no place for humanity science like stuff. There is quite a loot of examples getting to bare bones of the problems.

During my studies I had to go through all these Kernighans, Ritchies, Knuths, Ahos, Petzolds, and so on. I don't say I didn't liked them however, Beautiful Code reminds me all these books some way. Each problem described is somehow intriguing and innovative while at the same time you can say - hey, I have read that already, somewhere. Don't let me be misunderstood, I value the book, but for me, and for now, it's not the best pick. Hawking wrote once: "Somebody told me, that each equation put into my book will reduce the number of sold copies by two - thus I have referred to just one". Well, Beautiful Code has much, much more than one equation inside.


97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts
97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts
Price: £12.45

4.0 out of 5 stars get knowledge regarding most valuable programming practices, 26 July 2011
What I have liked from the very beginning of the book, was the way the content description was organized. There are two tables of content - first one, regular one, second one divides book into different categories, thus you can read just essays related to particular topic. Another great advantage of the book is the way essays were prepared - two pages per each of them. No wasted space, no elaborates, just the core of the problem that is discussed. The same thing refers to the index - I like books where you can find things within index easily and accurately.

Technical part of the book is the one side of he coin, second one is the content. 97 Things... is a book that covers topics you can find in many other books (Pragmatic Programmer, Agile Developer, Developers Notebook, Productive Programmer). What distinguish this book is the way topics are presented. Authors do not go deeply into details, they just sketch the issue, provide readers with the starting point and don't give them `silver bullet'. Many times you will fell like - `hey, I knew that already' - but that's OK, because you started to think about the again. I liked the book, I liked the topics, however different style of each essay might be confusing a little bit. If you like consistent style over the whole book, this will be a drawback. Another thing is - if you have read books like Pragmatic Programmer or Practices of an Agile Developer, rethink buying this book. You might feel disappointed. If you haven't read them - it might be a good starting point for getting a better programmer.


Intellectual Property and Open Source: A Practical Guide to Protecting Code
Intellectual Property and Open Source: A Practical Guide to Protecting Code
by Van Lindberg
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars get knowledge regarding various Open Source Licenses, 26 July 2011
Recently I was faced a problem to determine which code can be used within the software when different licenses are mixed. Which was not a pleasant task. Studying legal related topics usually doesn't count into `ten most interesting' things software engineers like to do.
However, sometimes you have to face the problem. Van Lindberg deconstructs the legal related issue in very structured way. First of all he defines all the legal related terms and provides examples for each case. After the background is settled he goes into details - how to deal with particular, license related issues when you start to develop something. What I have found most interesting was explanation of GPL license - which is widely used and very often miss understood. Another issue that is raised within the book, and worth thinking about, is your employment - does it inflict your thinking outside company? Are you aware of that it can?

What I can see at a first glance are the differences between USA law and European one. This makes it difficult to suggest this book as source of legal knowledge for anyone who lives outside USA. On the other hand, Van describes most common licenses that are available on the global `market' - which can help you some way. What I have missed, however was detailed description of BSD license. I think that BSD can be treated as competitor for GPL - some way, and it would be nice to see its detailed explanation - unless it is so simple that it doesn't require it. Would I recommend this book? It depends. If you live in USA I think it is good source of knowledge served in very clear way. If you live outside USA - I think you will only benefit from few chapters like GPL, Reverse Engineering, Choosing a license ones. If you need explanation of basing legal terms - I think you can go for it - regardless of your living place.


Programming Python
Programming Python
Price: £28.85

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars get knowledge regarding Python, 26 July 2011
Programming Python is one of these book you can kill with when dropped from appropriate height. I am not Python expert, rather casual Python programer, I focus rather on Java-Python bindings and I was looking for a book that I can use as a reference point. Python Programming covers quite a loot of Python related aspects of the language, is well structured, and covers most recent Python release (version 3).

Programing Python is not a typical programming book - famous "Hello world" occurs for the first time at page 129. It's more Python
reference book than programming book. Mark covers many, typical, issues that most programers will face during programming. What's good about this book are simple, straight and pragmatic examples - just the essence. However, sweet things have sometimes bitter taste when not served well. What I don't like within the book are huge code listings. I fell like putting 20 pages of code straight into text is simply waste of space. I prefer to use external resources (CD, source codes from ftp) instead of reading the code within the book (it's like going back to 90's). What I miss in the book is Python/Java integration. I use Python within Java and would like to read more regarding this topic the way Python/C integration is described. Would I recommend this book? If you are looking for Python reference - yes, if you are looking for Java-Python compendium - no.


Doing Business on Facebook: The Mini Missing Manual
Doing Business on Facebook: The Mini Missing Manual
Price: £3.36

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars get something back from Facebook, 26 July 2011
Facebook like portals are based on community - if there were no people willing to devote their time for it, Facebook wouldn't exist. Question rises - am I able to get something back from Facebook? Vander Veer claims that it's possible. By describing various features of Facebook explains how to utilize them in order to achieve certain goals. I would argue whether title of the book should state "Doing Business" thou. In my opinion this is just a little trick to get peoples' attention.

I am not Facebook fan at all, that's why I am not aware of it's features. I was looking for a book that could shade some light on this topic and was condense at the same time. In this term "Doing Business ..." is just fine. After reading section two you can get the feeling of what Facebook is about. If you need brief overlook of most of Facebook features - that's fine. When it comes doing business (section one), I don't fully agree with author. I don't think that creating Facebook resume is a good idea. I think standing out of the crowd would be better idea. Facebook page with links to your personal web site - fine. Moving your resume into Facebook - nope, thanks. In general, I have found what I was looking for. Would I recommend this book? If you don't know Facebook yet, I think the price of this book makes it a good deal to get it and see what's behind one of the most recognized logos.


Core Data iOS Essentials
Core Data iOS Essentials
by B.M.Harwani
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Core Data by example, 8 Jun. 2011
Whenever you start to develop an application it is just a matter of time when you decide that you need to save some data. No matter what will it be - settings for the application, list of the groceries in your TODO application, score achieved by the player during the game or some images. In that case, Code Data comes in handy. Core Data provides developer with an abstraction layer between GUI and datastore (whether it will be a flat file or SQLite database).

Bintu Harwani tries to make this topic easier for the readers by providing the with the building process of the application that utilizes Core Data. At first, he goes over general, Core Data related, topics. He also presents target application that will be developed. Then, Objective-C content required for the application is explained - that is, protocols and Table View. After the indispensable introduction author jumps right into Core Data development.

I, personally, prefer Cookbook like books, where certain topics are discussed without being bound to a particular topic too much. In this book different approach is presented. You are presented development process. In order to get as much as possible out of it you have to follow it from the start to the end. I think this approach is quite good for beginners where examples are more valuable than pure theory. In this terms I think that book might be useful for the beginners indeed. However, there are few drawbacks.

First of all, book addresses iOS 3.0 while there is iOS 4.0 already heavily used and iOS 5.0 is already announced and ready for download for registered Apple iOS Developers. Basing on the XCode screen shoots I guess that XCode 3 was used instead of XCode 4. This may lead sometimes into confusion. You will see something different within book comparing to what you see on the screen. Another drawback is the way book is arranged. At least it is an issue for me. Within second chapter there is a section that describes applications behavior. This description goes over all the functionalities which is, for me, too detailed. I'd rather see just a brief description of application within section "Understanding Core Data" while at the same time I'd prefer to see details within chapters devoted to particular part of the application.

I think that book can help readers to go through the basics of Core Data. I wouldn't recommend it for more advanced users that are looking for more sophisticated solutions within Core Data related area. But I think this is what title says. This book is about essentials, and in that case it is just fine.


Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook
Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook
by Jeff Hawkins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

3.0 out of 5 stars recipes for Mac OS Developers, 6 Jun. 2011
Cocoa and Objective C Cookbook is a typical cookbook for programmers. It contains 78 recipes related to various aspects of Mac OS X development. You will find here snippets of code that target User Interface, events handling (gestures), file management, web content analysis, database related topics as well as topics related to application architecture and Objective-C language itself.

In general, book is well organized. Each chapter is divided into few sections: Getting ready, How to do it, How it works, There is more and See also. Each section discuses different aspects of the issue. In fact, section names are fully self explaining. There are few topics that will surely make your life easier, like Singleton pattern related recipe, sections devoted to HTTP request, or ones that are devoted to database based development. These provide you with fast start by providing readers with ready to use snippets. If I can value the topics covered within the book, I definitely can't understand the requirements. Book is based on XCode 2.4 when version 4 is available on the market for longer than half of the year. This makes some parts of the book completely in comprehensive in terms of the topics covered as well as the IDE itself. You are no longer required to use external XIB editor, there are completely different icons within XCode, some options are located in different places. This is really a drawback. Another issue is the way chapters are organized. At some point it looks like author jumps from topic to topic without any specific schema. For example, chapters devoted to Objective-C and Application's Architecture are located in the middle of the book. It looks little bit strange to me.

Would I recommend this book? It depends. There are few topics that are hard to find in other Cocoa related books. It has well prepared examples that you can download directly from the Packt's page. If you are looking for most recent book on the market, devoted to most recent XCode - this book is not for you. If you don't pay that much attention to details, you will probably find few recipes that will make your life easier.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8