Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle New Album - Foo Fighters Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's
Profile for Mme Linda Sansome > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Mme Linda Sansome
Top Reviewer Ranking: 11,206,801
Helpful Votes: 31

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Mme Linda Sansome (Brittany, France)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
A Guilty Thing Surprised: (A Wexford Case)
A Guilty Thing Surprised: (A Wexford Case)
by Ruth Rendell
Edition: Paperback

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Early Reg Wexford, 23 Sept. 2004
This is an early Detective Chief Inspector Wexford book - published in 1970. The fascination for me, was to discover the start of that strong relationship he has with Detective Inspector Mike Burden - his now long-time sidekick. The story now appears slightly old-fashioned, in it's concept of 'Rich man in the castle, poor man at the gate', but is nonetheless a good, strong mystery.
Elizabeth Nightingale - the rich man's wife - is found murdered - the usual suspects abound - the seemingly uxurious husband, the disgruntled gardener - but we are in Ruth Rendell country, and nothing is ever quite what it seems!
The author seems to be able to ally the normal problems that the main protagonists deal with and the same sort of problem, spiraling out of control in the hands of the deeply disturbed. Vintage Ruth Rendell!


Outer Banks
Outer Banks
by Anne Rivers Siddons
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Friendship, 17 Aug. 2003
This review is from: Outer Banks (Hardcover)
This, to my mind, is the best of Anne Rivers Siddons books - that I have read so far, at least.The author does this so well,exploring the friendship that can grow between women. She introduces us to four women, of whom the narrator, Kate, is the catalyst for the changes in all their lives. Kate, the daughter of pretentious parents, desperately trying to hide her background. Cecie,really an aristocrat, dirt-poor, with a delightful wit and charm, a truly good person. Ginger, nouveau-riche, kind, fun, happy, convinced she can never be like elegant Kate. The awful Fig, ugly, brilliant, and totally unlovable. They all come together in the late 60's, at college. Here Kate meets the man she thinks is the love of her life, gifted Paul. Well, life never does work out the way you think it will, and Kate is desperately hurt by the end of her college days. She loses touch with the others, and it is thirty years later that she accepts to meet them all again. It is only then that she discovers how life has dealt with the other women, and that maybe some changes, on the surface seemingly good, are not, in fact, so.


Hill Towns
Hill Towns
by Anne Rivers Siddons
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Time Of Change, 17 Aug. 2003
This review is from: Hill Towns (Paperback)
The majority of Anne Rivers Siddons books - of those that I have read - seem to deal with how people cope with the damage and trauma of their own pasts. This book is no exception. Cat Gaillard, the narrator of the story, is a deeply damaged woman. She is born in Tennesee, to an educated father, and the daughter of, frankly, religious fanatics. Due to the appallingly stupid accident that takes her young parents lives, Cat becomes agrophobic. She marries well, but cannot bring herself to leave what she perceives as the safety of the mountain community. It is her daughter's example of courage and independence (won't say any more about that!) that finally pushes her into seeking help. She and her husband accept a friend's invitation to Italy, and there she starts to find her own strengths. And she needs to be strong - because perhaps her husband quite liked the stay-at-home, dependant Cat?


Downtown
Downtown
by Anne Rivers Siddons
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Coming - of - Age, 17 Aug. 2003
This review is from: Downtown (Paperback)
This clever book gives the reader a chance to see what the deep south in America was like just before the great social changes of the late 1960's. The narrator, a young, innocent Catholic girl, just "up from the country" finds herself at the heart of this young revolution. Smoky has her own changing to do, her own prejudices to root out, before she learns to accept herself, her background, and the rapidly - changing society. I really did enjoy this book, as it does seem to give a realistic idea of how it was to grow up at a time of momentous change. The author, through the eyes of Smoky, made me see more clearly some aspects of the Civil Rights Movement, the struggle Martin Luther King had, not only with the Right Wing politics of the time, but within his own Movement.


The Second Wexford Omnibus: A Guilty Thing Surprised,No More Dying Then and Murder Being Once Done: "No More Dying Then", "Guilty Thing Surprised" and "Murder Being Once Done" 2nd
The Second Wexford Omnibus: A Guilty Thing Surprised,No More Dying Then and Murder Being Once Done: "No More Dying Then", "Guilty Thing Surprised" and "Murder Being Once Done" 2nd
by Ruth Rendell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.99

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Wexford Trilogy, 2 July 2003
This compendium features three stories in the Chief Inspector Wexford series.They are early Ruth Rendell, from the 1970's.The fascination for me, was to discover Reginald Wexford and his side-kick, Inspector Michael Burden, at the beginning of their association. It is one of the favourite Ruth Rendell themes, to ally the background of the crime committed in the story, to that of a similar theme in the regular characters private lives. In this fashion,you are given the contrast between a problem that can be handled - albeit with difficulty - to a similar problem spiralling totally out of control in the hands of the deeply disturbed. This, I find, is most marked in her later stories, but you can see the beginnings of this thread, mainly in the second story,"No More Dying Then", where Michael Burden's private tragedy, coupled with a missing child's fate, probably changes his rather rigid prejudices forever. "A Guilty Thing Surprised", I found enjoyable, (of course I did, this IS Ruth Rendell!), but strangely old-fashioned, in its concept of "rich man at the castle, poor man at the gate". Dora Wexford, the Chief Inspector's wife, is very much on the side-lines here. By the last story,"Murder Being Once Done", she is beginning to become that rounded character from the later books. Wexford himself, in this story, made vulnerable by illness, is developing into that tenacious, intuitive man we have come to know. He is investigating a murder in London, outside his Sussex juridiction, and becomes desperate to prove to himself that he can still do his job adequately. He has to contend with a hostile London detective, and the unwanted pity of his own nephew.


Compromising Positions
Compromising Positions
by Susan Isaacs
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Murder in Suburbia, 22 Jun. 2003
This review is from: Compromising Positions (Paperback)
"Compromising Positions" is Susan Isaacs first book. Someone has murdered the local periodontist - a guy who seemingly enjoys taking care of all the neighbourhood (rich!) ladies needs, including their teeth! Bored housewife, Judith Singer, decides to investigate. She sets out to prove that the "H"-word certainly does not equal brain-dead; she is witty, intelligent, and sharp as a boxful of Sabatiers! She finds herself, along the way, working with a seriously sexy detective, giving her cause to question her marriage and the relationship she has with her own husband and life-style. I found the characters not as three-dimensional perhaps as those of Ms.Isaacs' later books, but for all that it is very amusing and highly readable.


Almost Paradise
Almost Paradise
by Susan Isaacs
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Almost Paradise" for me, too!, 15 Jun. 2003
This review is from: Almost Paradise (Paperback)
This is such a good, meaty read. It is the basic American success story - a melting-pot of cultures, producing a famous movie star, and his talented wife, Nicholas and Jane. The media become obsessed with them, and their incredibly - on the surface - glamourous lifestyle.Ms. Isaacs cleverly leads us through this complex mix of cultures, showing the reader not only how it gives them their looks, charm, and talent, but also their vulnerabilities and frailties. Their mistakes seem almost inevitable, as each suffered, in their way, appalling, abusive childhoods. I suppose that for Jane and Nicholas to achieve "Almost Paradise", is as much as they, or any of us, can hope for, but how I wanted to know what happened next!


Page: 1