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Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton)
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As Tears go By MARIANNE FAITHFULL
As Tears go By MARIANNE FAITHFULL

4.0 out of 5 stars A history of Marianne to the early 1990s, 19 July 2009
The author Mark Hodkinson does not have a high opinion on this first book of his on account of the style, choice of words and alleged malapropisms. He exaggerates; none of these detracted from my enjoyment of the text which complements Faithfull's autobiographies Memories, Dreams & Reflections and Faithfull: an Autobiography by filling in important gaps and providing detailed information on her musical and acting career. While not avoiding the scandals, it thoroughly covers her work and life up to the early 1990s in a mostly sympathetic portrayal.

Against the background of the `Swinging Sixties,' Hodkinson investigates the family history and Marianne's childhood and school years. She entered the pop scene in 1964 with the single As Tears Go By which was followed by a series of pop-folk hits. The author does an admirable job of describing her early recordings and their performance on the UK and USA charts. He evokes the flavor of swinging London with insight and humor in relating the marriage, her husband's personality and their circle of friends.

Then came Mick Jagger who emerges as the gentleman from these pages, and the scandals that plagued Marianne from that time forward. She preferred the stage and film to music in the late 1960s, neglecting her recording career. It seems to have been professional rivalry that led to her separation and divorce from Jagger. The song Wild Horses on the 1971 Rolling Stones album Sticky Fingers movingly articulates Mick's love for Marianne and his feelings of regret.

Addiction inhibited Marianne's creative expression during the early & middle 1970s. In 1977, however, the country album Faithless a.k.a. Dreaming my Dreams became a huge hit in Eire. This one, not Broken English, was the work where the transformation of her voice was first revealed. But it was the heyday of punk, a revolution that opened new opportunities of expresssion. Country was out and Marianne had met Ben Brierly of The Vibrators. She switched to angry material like poet Heathcote Williams' `Why'd Ya Do It?' during 1978 live performances.

Chris Blackwell of Island Records loved the new direction and signed her to his prestigious label with its many Jamaican artists and special talents with minority appeal like John Cale, Nick Drake, Nico, Robert Palmer, Grace Jones, Sparks, Richard Thompson and The Slits amongst others. The 1979 album Broken English established Marianne as a serious artist and sold respectably. I strongly disagree with the author's assessment of the individual tracks, with his opinions of the follow-ups Dangerous Acquaintances and A Child's Adventure as well as his views of the aforementioned Faithless and of 1990's live album Blazing Away.

The new `artistic' Marianne performed in the UK, USA and on the continent while experiencing further triumphs, travails and troubles related to substance addiction. She changed musical direction to critical acclaim with 1987's Strange Weather, a collection of blues, Broadway, torch & gospel covers. Finally, by comparing MF with her contemporaries the author explains her continued relevance by the fact that she'd never become dull. Hodkinson maintains that MF's earnestness and authenticity make her special.

As Tears Go By concludes with a discography of Singles, Extended Plays and Albums. 24pp pages of black & white plates contain 58 photographs of Marianne at various ages, John Dunbar, Baby Nicholas, Mick, Keith, Andrew Oldham, Brian Jones, Anita Pallenberg, Barry Reynolds, Ben Brierly, Chris Blackwell and many others. The Very Best of Marianne Faithfull is an excellent compilation of her early folk-pop music whilst Perfect Stranger: The Island Anthology offers the best of 1980 - 1998. Since then, Marianne has released consistently captivating albums like Vagabond Ways, Kissin Time, Before The Poison and Easy Come, Easy Go. She may be a minor musician sales-wise but the timeless quality of her music plus her aforementioned autobiographies that reveal a multi-faceted and skilled writer have added plenty of substance to the mystique.


No Title Available

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dynamic America versus stagnant Europe, 19 July 2009
This classic work on the USA and the concept of revolution was first published in English in 1971. Revel's astute analyses include the observations that European culture was stagnant and that Europeans were hopelessly uninformed on the United States. Even more alarmingly, Revel reveals that already at that time the European elites were projecting their guilt and self-loathing for their own imperialistic past onto the USA. The author also explores the idea of revolution, distinguishing mere revolts that lead to worse oppression from revolutions that bring individual freedom and progress.

He identifies 5 conditions & 5 solutions prerequisite for a successful revolution. There must be critiques of: 1 injustice in economic, social & racial relationships 2 management against the waste of human & material resources 3 political power, both its sources and exercise 4 culture, morality, religion, customs, art and the function of these in society 5 the old civilizational sanction and vindication of individual freedom. Revel then explains why a true revolution can take place only in the United States.

Chapters 4, 5 & 6 investigate to the impossible revolution in the communist nations, in Western Europe and in the Third World. The following chapter looks at the history of revolutions whilst the next focuses on national sovereignty, international relations, multilateral & bilateral agreements and wasteful military expenditures. Revel also devotes a chapter each to violence & revolution and to the one-way street from freedom to socialism, a subject on which Hayek's Road to Serfdom remains the classical text.

The phenomenon of Anti-Americanism about which he wrote a most perceptive and witty book in 2003, is dealt with in chapter 11. He identifies two basic kinds of anti-Americanism and subjects its causes and symptoms to close scrutiny. In this chapter he provides ample examples of its emotionally unhinged nature, its puerile sense of grievance, lack of logic, anti-Zionist and anti-Semitic undertones. America has faithfully its democratic institutions while Europe produced the Shoah/Holocaust, Stalin, Hitler, Mussolini, murderous collectivist ideologies and two world wars.

Revel points out that the cultural is the most humiliating form of defeat. The envy & resentment arising from that fuel much of the irrational anti-Americanism found amongst European elites. Several examples of verbatim conversations are provided in order to demonstrate the puerile and contradictory nature of this hatred of America. Since then, the phenomenon has grown as recorded by amongst others Andre Markovits, Bruce Bawer, Barry Rubin, David Horowitz, Paul Hollander, Jamie Glazov and Carol Gould. In addition, its close connection to anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism has become more explicit.

Chapters 12 & 13 cover the dynamics of revolution and the information revolution respectively. Interestingly, Revel claims that opinions formed by Propaganda are as easy to destroy as they are to create; counterpropaganda can in one day destroy what it took the state 20 years to fabricate. I found this of interest in relation to Eric Hoffer's claim in The True Believer that propaganda only serves to reinforce existing beliefs. Chapter 15: The Rights & The Means, provides evidence of the manifold means available to US citizens to defend their constitutional rights against the federal, state or municipal governments.

The final chapter which provided the title concludes that the only real revolution is taking place in America; a revolution involving culture, economic and technological power. Technological civilization is accepted as a means not an end. This revolution seeks not to destroy but to reshape society. Mary McCarthy's Afterword is flattering to Revel as iconoclast, a witty and enjoyable read but ultimately a bit shallow and devalued by her ideological bias. Revel tactfully but effectively refutes her obscurantism in the Author's Note to the American Edition, especially brilliantly on the definition of revolution.

I highly recommend Revel's How Democracies Perish along with his Anti-Americanism as well as Menace in Europe by Claire Berlinski and While Europe Slept by Bruce Bawer that expose the perilous situation of Europe. The ongoing attempt by progressives to subvert the US system is informatively examined by Jonah Goldberg in Liberal Fascism while two books by the French philosopher Chantal Delsol diagnoses the current malaise of Europe with great empathy: Icarus Fallen and The Unlearned Lessons Of the Twentieth Century: An Essay On Late Modernity.


Marianne Faithfull: As Tears Go by
Marianne Faithfull: As Tears Go by
by Mark Hodkinson
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Marianne up to 1991, 18 July 2009
The author Mark Hodkinson has expressed a harsh opinion on this first book of his published in 1991, based on the style, choice of words and malapropisms. None of these detracted from my enjoyment of the text, which while not avoiding the salacious, portrays Marianne in a sympathetic light. The book complements Faithfull's autobiographies Memories, Dreams and Reflections and Faithfull: An Autobiography by filling in important gaps and providing much more detailed information on her recordings, career and relationships.

The narrative starts with the 'Swinging Sixties' then moves into the family history, Marianne's childhood and school years. She entered the pop scene in 1964 with the single As Tears Go By which was followed by a series of pop-folk hits. The author does a splendid job of describing her early recordings and the impact they made on the UK and USA charts. Her husband and circle of friends at the time are arrestingly portrayed, evoking the flavor of swinging London with insight and humor.

Then came Mick Jagger who emerges as a gentleman from these pages, and the scandals that plagued Marianne from that time forward. Her stage and film acting took precedence over the music and it seems to be professional rivalry that led to her separation and divorce from Jagger. The song Wild Horses on the 1971 Rolling Stones album Sticky Fingers preserves Mick's love for Marianne and feelings of regret in a moving way.

For most of the 1970s, addiction inhibited Marianne's creative expression. In 1977, however, the country album Faithless a.k.a. Dreaming My Dreams became a huge hit in Eire. This, not Broken English, was the album where the transformation of her voice was first revealed. But it was the heyday of punk, a revolution that opened new opportunities of expression. Country was out and Marianne had met Ben Brierly of The Vibrators. She changed to angry material like poet Heathcote Williams' `Why'd Ya Do It?' during 1978 live performances.

Chris Blackwell of Island Records loved the new direction and signed her to his prestigious label with its many Jamaican artists and special talents with minority appeal like John Cale, Nick Drake, Nico, Robert Palmer, Grace Jones, Sparks, Richard Thompson and The Slits amongst others. The 1979 album Broken English established Marianne as a serious artist and sold respectably. I mostly disagree with the author's assessment of the individual tracks, with his opinions of the follow-ups Dangerous Acquaintances and A Child's Adventure as well as his views of the aforementioned Faithless and of 1990's live album Blazing Away.

The new 'respectable' Marianne performed in the UK, USA and on the continent while experiencing further triumphs, travails and troubles related to substance addiction. She changed musical direction to critical acclaim with 1987's Strange Weather, a collection of blues, Broadway, torch & gospel covers. Finally, the author compares MF with her 1960s contemporaries and explains her continued relevance by the fact that she'd never become dull. He identifies her fans as falling into three distinct groups. The narrative ends in early 1991 with Marianne touring the antipodes and a look at where her friends, acquaintances and family found themselves at that time. The text concludes with the observation that MF's earnestness and authenticity make her special.

The book concludes with a 1991 discography of Singles, Extended Plays and Albums with their track listings. There are 24 pages of plates with 58 black & white photographs of Marianne at various ages, John Dunbar, Baby Nicholas, Mick, Keith, Andrew Oldham, Brian Jones, Anita Pallenberg, Barry Reynolds, Ben Brierly, Chris Blackwell and many others. Marianne Faithfull's Greatest Hits is an excellent compilation of her early folk-pop music whilst Perfect Stranger offers the best of 1980 - 1998 Island years. Since then, Marianne has released consistently captivating albums like Vagabond Ways, Kissin Time, Before The Poison and Easy Come, Easy Go. She may be a minor musician sales-wise but the quality of her music is timeless and her two aforementioned autobiographies reveal a multi-faceted, intelligent and mature character with magical writing skills.


Without Marx or Jesus: The New American Revolution Has Begun
Without Marx or Jesus: The New American Revolution Has Begun
by Jean-François Revel
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Time has vindicated Revel, 18 July 2009
FIRST published in English in 1971, this classic work on US society and the nature of revolution proved to be prescient I many respects. Revel's astute analyses include the observations that European culture was stagnant and that Europeans were hopelessly ignorant and uninformed on the United States. Even more alarmingly, then already the European elites were projecting onto the USA their guilt and self-loathing for their own imperialistic past. The author also explores the concept of revolution, distinguishing mere revolts that lead to worse oppression from revolutions with a lasting beneficial effect.

He identifies 5 conditions prerequisite for revolution and 5 solutions to the unsatisfactory conditions. There must be critiques of: 1 injustice in economic, social & racial relationships 2 management against the waste of human & material resources 3 political power, both its sources and exercise 4 culture, morality, religion, customs, art and the function of these in society 5 the old civilizational sanction and vindication of individual freedom. Revel then explains why a true revolution can take place only in the United States.

Chapters 4, 5 & 6 are devoted to the impossible revolution in the communist nations, in Western Europe and in the Third World. The following chapter looks at the history of revolutions whilst the next focuses on national sovereignty, international relations, multilateral & bilateral agreements and wasteful military expenditures. Revel also devotes a chapter each to violence & revolution and to the one-way street from freedom to socialism, a subject on which Hayek's The Road to Serfdom remains the classical text.

The phenomenon of Anti-Americanism about which he wrote a most perceptive and witty book in 2003, is dealt with in chapter 11. He identifies two basic kinds of anti-Americanism and subjects its causes and symptoms to close scrutiny. The 2nd kind - the obsessive and irrational, is the subject of his aforementioned book. In this chapter he provides ample examples of its emotionally unhinged nature, its sense of grievance, lack of logic, anti-Zionist and antisemitic undertones. Since its birth America has preserved its democratic institutions while Europe produced the Shoah/Holocaust, Stalin, Hitler, Mussolini, murderous collectivist ideologies and world wars.

Revel points out that cultural defeat is the most humiliating form of defeat. The envy & resentment arising from that is behind much of the irrational anti-Americanism found amongst European elites. Several examples of verbatim conversations are provided in order to demonstrate the puerile and contradictory nature of this hatred of America. Since then, the phenomenon has grown as recorded by amongst others Andre Markovits, Bruce Bawer, Barry Rubin, David Horowitz, Paul Hollander, Jamie Glazov and Carol Gould. In addition, its close connection to anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism has become more explicit.

Chapters 12 & 13 cover the dynamics of the dynamics of revolution and the information revolution. Interestingly, Revel claims that opinions formed by Propaganda are as easy to destroy as they are to create; counterpropaganda can in one day destroy what it took the state 20 years to fabricate. I found this of interest in relation to Eric Hoffer's claim in The True Believer that propaganda only serves to reinforce existing beliefs. Chapter 15: The Rights & The Means, provides evidence of the manifold means available to US citizens to defend their constitutional rights against the federal, state or municipal governments.

The final chapter which gave the book its title concludes that the only real revolution is taking place in America; a revolution involving culture, economic and technological power. Technological civilization is accepted as a means not an end. This revolution seeks not to destroy but to reshape society. Mary McCarthy's Afterword is very flattering to Revel as iconoclast, a witty and enjoyable read but ultimately a bit shallow and devalued by her ideological blinkers. Revel tactfully but effectively refutes her obscurantism in the Author's Note to the American Edition, especially brilliantly as regards the definition of revolution.

I highly recommend Revel's How Democracies Perish along with his aforementioned book and Sinisterism by Bruce Walker for further illumination of the difference between American and European forms of democracy. The attempts by progressives to subvert the US system is informatively revealed by Jonah Goldberg in Liberal Fascism while two books by the French philosopher Chantal Delsol diagnoses the current malaise of Western civilization with great empathy: Icarus Fallen and The Unlearned Lessons of the Twentieth Century.


No Title Available

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Societies that choose security over economic freedom will have neither, 12 July 2009
This definitive edition has been edited and provided with a Foreword and Introduction by Bruce Caldwell who retained the prefaces and forewords of earlier editions. The text has been enhanced by explanatory notes and new appendices that are listed at the end of this review.

Even after six decades, The Road To Serfdom remains essential for understanding economics, politics and history. Hayek's main point, that whatever the problem, human nature demands that government provide the solution and that this is the road to hell, remains more valid than ever. He demonstrated the similarities between Soviet communism and fascism in Germany and Italy.

The consensus in post-war Europe was for the welfare state which seemed humane and sensible for a long time. Now it is clear that this has led to declining birth-rates amongst native Europeans, mass immigration from North Africa and the Middle East, and a tendency to exchange their ancient cultural values for multiculturalism and moral relativism which is just another form of nihilism as the French philosopher Chantal Delsol observes.

In this timeless classic, Hayek examines issues like planning and power, the fallacy of the utopian idea, state planning versus the rule of law, economic control, totalitarianism, security and economic freedom. He brilliantly explains how we are faced with two irreconcilable forms of social organization. Choice and risk either reside with the individual or s/he is relieved of both. Societies that opt for security instead of economic freedom will in the long run have neither.

Complete economic security is inseparable from restrictions on liberty - it becomes the security of the barracks. When the striving for security becomes stronger than the love of freedom, a society gets into deep trouble. The way to prosperity for all is to remove the obstacles of bureaucracy in order to release the creative energy of individuals.

The government's job is not to plan for progress but to create the conditions favorable to it. This has been proved by the impressive economic expansion under Reagan and Thatcher and by the amazing growth of the Asian Tiger economies, and most recently India since it started implementing sensible economic policies. Everywhere entrepreneurial energy is unshackled, massive improvements follow.

Nowhere is this more obvious than in the contrast between phenomenal growth in formerly communist countries like Estonia or Poland or even the economic health of the UK as measured against the stagnant economies of Germany and France during the first years of the millennium. Old Europe would have benefited by a Thatcher and the French would have welcomed Polish plumbers instead of being resentful.

Hayek warns against utopian yearnings that are exploited by politicians, the stealthy way in which welfarism diminishes individual freedom, the totalitarian impulse and different types of propaganda. As pointed out by Chantal Delsol in Icarus Fallen, lack of personal responsibility leads to perpetual adolescence where citizens conflate desires with rights. Defining this process as the "sacralization" of rights, she shows that freedoms are then transformed into entitlements.

What a pity people don't learn; what a blessing we have in The Road to Serfdom as a reminder and a warning. The new Appendix of Related Documents include: Nazi-Socialism (1933), Reader's Report by Frank Knight (1943), Reader's Report by Jacob Marschak (1943), Foreword to the 1944 American Edition by John Chamberlain, Letter from John Scoon to C. Hartley Grattan (1945) and Introduction to the 1994 Edition by Milton Friedman. The book concludes with an index.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 13, 2009 8:18 PM BST


Hurricane
Hurricane

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How sweet the sound, 11 July 2009
This review is from: Hurricane (Audio CD)
Grace Jones co-wrote every track on this welcome comeback released 19 years after Bulletproof Heart and 31 years after her debut album Portfolio. After the disco trilogy she made a successful transition to experimental rock & torch with Warm Leatherette (1980). Most important amongst the guest musicians here are Sly Dunbar & Robbie Shakespeare whilst Tricky, Brian Eno and others also lend a hand. On the assertive opening track This Is, driving rhythms and gritty guitars alternate with trip-hop segments and distant voices while Grace herself uses her semi-spoken style to striking effect in both the Jamaican and North American accents.

She goes biographical on Williams' Blood, a moving family history over a lilting beat and prominent guitars which like the following two and the title track, has a complex arrangement and multifaceted sonic structure. Williams' Blood mixes reggae & gospel in a most appealing manner and ends with a line from Amazing Grace echoed by a strange backing vocal. From nostalgic to menacing, Corporate Cannibal at first evokes Demolition Man from Nightclubbing except it turns out not to be a first person narrative and the blend of sounds is much harsher with roaring and warbling guitars framed by illbient textures.

Her contralto vocals come to the fore on I'm Crying (Mother's Tears), an atmospheric track where she tenderly revisits the (auto)biographical theme. Musically, Private Life from Warm Leatherette seems to be the template for Well Well Well with its reggae beat, although there's more electronics, guitars and a funkier overall sound. Hurricane itself starts on a brooding note and becomes a gale force tour de force containing both soaring & sensitive vocals, whispers, stuttering beats, drones, dubs and exquisite keyboard patterns that progress through frequent tempo changes.

Reggae returns on Love You To Life, a ballad with enigmatic lyrics which has something of Nightclubbing about it whilst the tuneful ballad Sunset Sunrise is embellished by Theremin, other-wordly synths and sound effects. To my relief, a verse or two is sung in French, continuing the tradition first begun with La Vie en Rose on Portfolio and carried through chansons like Autumn Leaves on Fame (1978) Pars on Warm Leatherette (1980), Libertango on Nightclubbing (1981) and Amado Mio on Bulletproof Heart. The album concludes with Devil In My Life which blends elements of classical music in the symphonic synths with abrasive industrial noises.

The arrangements are complex throughout while massed guitars, dark electro patterns, spectral backing vocals, intricate keyboard flourishes and weird sound effects make this one of Ms Jones' most musically interesting works. It's contemporary but less accessible than say, the melodious albeit mostly robotic disco of the first three albums, the catchy tunes of Nightclubbing, the arresting renditions on Warm Leatherette, the memorable moods of Living My Life or the perfect pop of Inside Story. Hurricane still has the Sly & Robbie imprint but the music is more multitextured, polyrhythmic and vocally diverse.


Hurricane
Hurricane
Offered by Great Price Media EU
Price: £6.25

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Impressive comeback, 11 July 2009
This review is from: Hurricane (Audio CD)
Grace Jones co-wrote every track on this welcome comeback released 19 years after Bulletproof Heart and 31 years after her debut album Portfolio that was followed by Fame (1978) and Muse (1979). After that disco trilogy she made a successful transition to experimental rock and the torch song with Warm Leatherette (1980). Most important amongst the guest musicians here are Sly Dunbar & Robbie Shakespeare whilst Tricky, Brian Eno and others also lend a hand. On the assertive opening track This Is, driving rhythms and gritty guitars alternate with trip-hop segments and distant voices while Grace herself uses her semi-spoken style to striking effect in both the Jamaican and North American accents.

Next she goes biographical on Williams' Blood, a moving family history over a lilting beat and prominent guitars which like the following two and the title track, has a complex arrangement and multifaceted sonic structure. Williams' Blood mixes reggae & gospel in a most appealing manner and ends with a line from Amazing Grace echoed by a strange backing vocal. From nostalgic to menacing, Corporate Cannibal at first evokes Demolition Man from Nightclubbing except it turns out not to be a first person narrative and the blend of sounds is much harsher with roaring and warbling guitars framed by illbient textures.

Her contralto vocals come to the fore on I'm Crying (Mother's Tears), an atmospheric track where she tenderly revisits the (auto)biographical theme. Musically, Private Life from Warm Leatherette seems to be the template for Well Well Well with its reggae beat, although there's more electronics, guitars and a funkier overall sound. Hurricane itself starts on a brooding note and becomes a gale force tour de force containing both soaring & sensitive vocals, whispers, stuttering beats, drones, dubs and exquisite keyboard patterns that progress through frequent tempo changes.

Reggae returns on Love You To Life, a ballad with enigmatic lyrics which has something of Nightclubbing about it whilst the tuneful ballad Sunset Sunrise is embellished by Theremin, other-wordly synths and sound effects. To my relief, a verse or two is sung in French, continuing the tradition first begun with La Vie en Rose on Portfolio and carried through chansons like Autumn Leaves on Fame (1978) Pars on Warm Leatherette (1980), Libertango on Nightclubbing (1981) and Amado Mio on Bulletproof Heart. The album concludes with Devil In My Life which blends elements of classical music in the symphonic synths with abrasive industrial noises.

The arrangements are complex throughout while massed guitars, dark electro patterns, spectral backing vocals, intricate keyboard flourishes and weird sound effects make this one of Ms Jones' most musically interesting works. It's contemporary but less accessible than say, the melodious albeit mostly robotic disco of the first three albums, the catchy tunes of Nightclubbing, the arresting covers on Warm Leatherette, the memorable moods of Living My Life or the perfect pop of Inside Story. Hurricane still has the Sly & Robbie imprint but the music is more multitextured, polyrhythmic and vocally diverse.


Testosterone for Life: Recharge Your Vitality, Sex Drive, Muscle Mass, and Overall Health (All Other Health)
Testosterone for Life: Recharge Your Vitality, Sex Drive, Muscle Mass, and Overall Health (All Other Health)
by Abraham Morgentaler
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.40

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For the love of life, 10 July 2009
Written by an expert in testosterone therapy, Testosterone for Life covers all aspects of testosterone & testosterone supplementation in a witty and accessible style. Drawing on 30 years' research, the author discusses the role of this hormone in the body, symptoms of its deficiency, safe supplementation and its benefits, plus the latest scientific breakthroughs. He uses anecdotes from his practice backed by established data and the latest research. The chapters conclude with case studies of men who have benefited by supplementation and a question & answer section. The book confirms Dr William Regelson's claims for testosterone in his groundbreaking book The Superhormone Promise but is more extensive and up to date.

The symptoms of deficiency include libidinal dysfunction in many men over 40 years, erectile dysfunction, loss of energy, lethargy, fatigue, low mood or clinical depression, muscle loss and fat gain. Low testosterone also increases the risk of osteoporosis and resultant fractures. Boosting testosterone levels may lead to improved overall health, increased vitality, sharper mental agility and an increase in lean muscle mass whilst reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Various ways of supplementation like the patch, gel, injection & pellet, possible side effects & medical monitoring are examined in detail.

Morgentaler's research revealed that the historical fear of higher testosterone levels increasing the risk of prostate cancer is baseless, lacking scientific support. In fact the latest research results indicate just the opposite; that prostate cancer risk may be greater among men with low levels of the hormone. In the last chapter, the author investigates preliminary evidence which suggests that testosterone supplementation may profoundly improve quality of life by means of a wide array of general health benefits. Testosterone for Life is an informative read and valuable reference guide. The text is enhanced by illustrations.

Of course testosterone is not the only natural hormone of which supplementation brings about improved health. The body's production of all of them declines with age. The benefits of DHEA, part of which is converted into testosterone in the body, are discussed by Stephen Cherniske and Ray Sahelian who has also written informative books on melatonin and pregnenolone. Ronald Klatz & Robert Goldman have long investigated anti-aging and age reversal techniques; testosterone is amongst the substances examined in their latest work The Official Anti-Aging Revolution.


Paris 1919
Paris 1919

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Elegant & melodious, 5 July 2009
This review is from: Paris 1919 (Audio CD)
This classic 1973 album has been enhanced by the addition of 11 tracks of demos and alternate takes. Paris 1919 is atypical for John Cale, being consistently tuneful and mainstream with little experimentation. Some of his most poetic lyrics are found on these elegant songs, most of which are ballads that bring to mind the music of Scott Walker at his creative peak on Boy Child 67-70. A reggae ditty and a powerful rock song ensure stylistic variety.

There is a subdued, desolate air about Child's Christmas in Wales, Hanky Panky Nohow and Half Past France while subdued, whispered vocals make Antarctica a brooding, moody track. With its impressive orchestral backing Paris 1919 is less of a rock album than most of his best later work, like for example the three Island Years albums. The exception is Macbeth, a robust, even blistering slice of up-tempo rock.

The ballad arrangements may be orchestral but the melodies are simple and appealing for the most part, as on the lovely Andalucia. The delightful title track with its edgy arrangement, birdsong and refrain of "you're a ghost, la la la" is especially striking, while the lilting reggae beat and trenchant lyrics of Graham Greene render it catchy and charming. Paris 1919 is simultaneously a very 'literary' album and Cale at his most accessible. The bonus tracks are interesting but there's nothing exceptional about any of them.


Simply the Best
Simply the Best
Price: £7.91

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some of the best from the early period, 4 July 2009
This review is from: Simply the Best (Audio CD)
This compilation of her late 70s and early 80s work draws heavily upon Nina Hagen's first two albums, Nina Hagen Band (1978) and Unbehagen (1980). The albums Nunsexmonkrock (1982), Fearless (1983) and In Ekstasy (1985) contribute only Zarah, My Way and Smack Jack.

The best tracks are TV Glotzer (White Punks On Dope, originally by The Tubes), African Reggae (her German version of Lene Lovich's Lucky Number which is titled Wir Leben Immer Noch), Unbeschreiblich Weiblich and Natürtrane. These capture the essence of the early Nina Hagen as it extended the boundaries of rock, punk and reggae in its seamless operatic fusion and innovative rhythmic explorations.

She performs with enthusiasm backed by tight playing and the arrangements are always captivating, whether mainstream or experimental. The music has aged very well. Nina opens Zarah in an atmospheric chansonesque introduction before the sound of breaking glass unleashes a powerful rock segment as her voice bursts forth with great vigor.

The complex arrangement of Smack Jack has frequent tempo changes, alternating frenzied and tranquil segments and extreme vocal variation. She interprets the Frank Sinatra classic My Way in her way in German at breakneck speed. Although a worthwhile compilation, Simply The Best does not fully deserve its title due to the omission of great songs like Born In Xixax, New York New York, The Lord's Prayer & Springtime In Paris from the era covered.


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