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Squirr-El (The Metropolis, England)
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Movement (Vol 1), The # 6 (Ref2048334280)
Movement (Vol 1), The # 6 (Ref2048334280)
by DC Comics
Edition: Comic

3.0 out of 5 stars Issue #6, 28 May 2015
The story running through issues #1-6 of DC Comics’ New 52 series ‘the Movement’ is collected in The Movement Volume 1: Class Warfare TP (The New 52). Despite being written by one of DC Comics’ top writers, and illustrated by an excellent artist, this story just didn’t do anything for me.

The story is set in, on and under the streets of Coral City, a decrepit city in the hands of property developers, who control the city government and privatised police force. The Movement is a group of street-kids with powers, who are organising themselves and other destitute and disempowered people to protest against the authoritarian methods of the property developers. When the Movement kidnaps two police officers who were involved in an incident with a minor, the police are forced to take action, which leads to the revelation of the kids’ powers.

The kids are divided into passive and aggressive factions, and the story shows quite well the way that political movements can easily lose control to hard-line minorities simply through lack of inherent strength and will on the part of the liberal left.

The story is basically an escalating show of strength between the two forces - authority and rebellion - with a serial killer taking advantage of the chaos to have fun. There are no really major characters that the (this) reader can identify with, and both sides have very little to make them attractive to us - though young, thoughtless or rebelliously inclined readers might not agree. I read a library copy, and will read the next volume to see where the story goes, but it was not a particularly interesting read for me.


Movement (Vol 1), The # 5 (Ref-1269786178)
Movement (Vol 1), The # 5 (Ref-1269786178)
by DC Comics
Edition: Comic

3.0 out of 5 stars Issue #5, 28 May 2015
The story running through issues #1-6 of DC Comics’ New 52 series ‘the Movement’ is collected in The Movement Volume 1: Class Warfare TP (The New 52). Despite being written by one of DC Comics’ top writers, and illustrated by an excellent artist, this story just didn’t do anything for me.

The story is set in, on and under the streets of Coral City, a decrepit city in the hands of property developers, who control the city government and privatised police force. The Movement is a group of street-kids with powers, who are organising themselves and other destitute and disempowered people to protest against the authoritarian methods of the property developers. When the Movement kidnaps two police officers who were involved in an incident with a minor, the police are forced to take action, which leads to the revelation of the kids’ powers.

The kids are divided into passive and aggressive factions, and the story shows quite well the way that political movements can easily lose control to hard-line minorities simply through lack of inherent strength and will on the part of the liberal left.

The story is basically an escalating show of strength between the two forces - authority and rebellion - with a serial killer taking advantage of the chaos to have fun. There are no really major characters that the (this) reader can identify with, and both sides have very little to make them attractive to us - though young, thoughtless or rebelliously inclined readers might not agree. I read a library copy, and will read the next volume to see where the story goes, but it was not a particularly interesting read for me.


Movement (Vol 1), The # 4 (Ref232923607)
Movement (Vol 1), The # 4 (Ref232923607)
by DC Comics
Edition: Comic

3.0 out of 5 stars Issue #4, 28 May 2015
The story running through issues #1-6 of DC Comics’ New 52 series ‘the Movement’ is collected in The Movement Volume 1: Class Warfare TP (The New 52). Despite being written by one of DC Comics’ top writers, and illustrated by an excellent artist, this story just didn’t do anything for me.

The story is set in, on and under the streets of Coral City, a decrepit city in the hands of property developers, who control the city government and privatised police force. The Movement is a group of street-kids with powers, who are organising themselves and other destitute and disempowered people to protest against the authoritarian methods of the property developers. When the Movement kidnaps two police officers who were involved in an incident with a minor, the police are forced to take action, which leads to the revelation of the kids’ powers.

The kids are divided into passive and aggressive factions, and the story shows quite well the way that political movements can easily lose control to hard-line minorities simply through lack of inherent strength and will on the part of the liberal left.

The story is basically an escalating show of strength between the two forces - authority and rebellion - with a serial killer taking advantage of the chaos to have fun. There are no really major characters that the (this) reader can identify with, and both sides have very little to make them attractive to us - though young, thoughtless or rebelliously inclined readers might not agree. I read a library copy, and will read the next volume to see where the story goes, but it was not a particularly interesting read for me.


The Movement Volume 1: Class Warfare TP (The New 52) by Simone, Gail (2014) Paperback
The Movement Volume 1: Class Warfare TP (The New 52) by Simone, Gail (2014) Paperback
by Gail Simone
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Street-kid superhero gang, 28 May 2015
The story running through issues #1-6 of DC Comics’ New 52 series ‘the Movement’ is collected in The Movement Volume 1: Class Warfare TP (The New 52). Despite being written by one of DC Comics’ top writers, and illustrated by an excellent artist, this story just didn’t do anything for me.

The story is set in, on and under the streets of Coral City, a decrepit city in the hands of property developers, who control the city government and privatised police force. The Movement is a group of street-kids with powers, who are organising themselves and other destitute and disempowered people to protest against the authoritarian methods of the property developers. When the Movement kidnaps two police officers who were involved in an incident with a minor, the police are forced to take action, which leads to the revelation of the kids’ powers.

The kids are divided into passive and aggressive factions, and the story shows quite well the way that political movements can easily lose control to hard-line minorities simply through lack of inherent strength and will on the part of the liberal left.

The story is basically an escalating show of strength between the two forces - authority and rebellion - with a serial killer taking advantage of the chaos to have fun. There are no really major characters that the (this) reader can identify with, and both sides have very little to make them attractive to us - though young, thoughtless or rebelliously inclined readers might not agree. I read a library copy, and will read the next volume to see where the story goes, but it was not a particularly interesting read for me.


Edge of Spider-Verse #1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 Complete Set (Marvel Now, Spiderman, Spiderverse) All 1st Printings
Edge of Spider-Verse #1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 Complete Set (Marvel Now, Spiderman, Spiderverse) All 1st Printings
by Marvel Comics
Edition: Comic

5.0 out of 5 stars Edge of Spider-Verse, 28 May 2015
The stories from issues #1-5 of the “Elseworlds” mini-series Edge of Spider-Verse are collected as Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse. This collection is a mixed-bag of stories and styles, ranging from superb to stunning in quality, apart from one, which didn’t work for me, but I suppose there has to be a Dark Spider-Man out there in the multiverse somewhere. See Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 2: Spider-Verse Prelude for the background to these stories.

The only thing that these stories have in common is that they feature an alternate-reality origin for a Spider-Man (or Woman, or suit of armour, or symbiote//robot or whatever), and that they are all under threat from the Spider-Hunters, who turn up towards the end of each story, with various members of the Legion of Superior Spider-Men arriving from the 30th century to recruit any survivors at the end of the story. Not everyone makes it out, however.

For a breakdown of the individual stories, see Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse.


Edge of Spider-Verse #5 ((Marvel Comics)) Marvel Now ((1st Print)) October 2014 ((Regular Jake Wyatt Cover))
Edge of Spider-Verse #5 ((Marvel Comics)) Marvel Now ((1st Print)) October 2014 ((Regular Jake Wyatt Cover))

5.0 out of 5 stars Issue #5 - “SP//DR”, 28 May 2015
The stories from issues #1-5 of the “Elseworlds” mini-series Edge of Spider-Verse are collected as Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse. This collection is a mixed-bag of stories and styles, ranging from superb to stunning in quality, apart from one, which didn’t work for me, but I suppose there has to be a Dark Spider-Man out there in the multiverse somewhere. See Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 2: Spider-Verse Prelude for the background to these stories.

The only thing that these stories have in common is that they feature an alternate-reality origin for a Spider-Man (or Woman, or suit of armour, or symbiote//robot or whatever), and that they are all under threat from the Spider-Hunters, who turn up towards the end of each story, with various members of the Legion of Superior Spider-Men arriving from the 30th century to recruit any survivors at the end of the story. Not everyone makes it out, however.

Issue #5 - “SP//DR” - features a Japanese-style robot suit, whose operator dies in battle, and his little schoolgirl daughter is the only generically-matched person able to bond with it… guest starring Daredevil (though with hints of the original one included) and guest-villaining another Mysterio.


Edge of Spider-Verse #4 (2014) - Marvel Now!
Edge of Spider-Verse #4 (2014) - Marvel Now!
by Clay Mcleod Chapman
Edition: Comic

4.0 out of 5 stars Issue #4 - “I Walked with a Spider”, 28 May 2015
The stories from issues #1-5 of the “Elseworlds” mini-series Edge of Spider-Verse are collected as Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse. This collection is a mixed-bag of stories and styles, ranging from superb to stunning in quality, apart from one, which didn’t work for me, but I suppose there has to be a Dark Spider-Man out there in the multiverse somewhere. See Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 2: Spider-Verse Prelude for the background to these stories.

The only thing that these stories have in common is that they feature an alternate-reality origin for a Spider-Man (or Woman, or suit of armour, or symbiote//robot or whatever), and that they are all under threat from the Spider-Hunters, who turn up towards the end of each story, with various members of the Legion of Superior Spider-Men arriving from the 30th century to recruit any survivors at the end of the story. Not everyone makes it out, however.

Issue #4 - “I Walked with a Spider” - is a horror story, in a modernised Timely/Atlas style, in which an unpleasant schoolboy gets bitten by a radioactive spider while helping neighbour Mary-Jane rescue lab animals. Over the course of the issue, the spider slowly comes to dominate the man, and eventually, after working his way up the food-chain, he reaches MJ…


MARVEL COMICS EDGE OF THE SPIDER-VERSE #3
MARVEL COMICS EDGE OF THE SPIDER-VERSE #3
by Dustin Weaver
Edition: Comic

5.0 out of 5 stars Issue #3 - “Aaron Aikman - The Spider-Man”, 28 May 2015
The stories from issues #1-5 of the “Elseworlds” mini-series Edge of Spider-Verse are collected as Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse. This collection is a mixed-bag of stories and styles, ranging from superb to stunning in quality, apart from one, which didn’t work for me, but I suppose there has to be a Dark Spider-Man out there in the multiverse somewhere. See Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 2: Spider-Verse Prelude for the background to these stories.

The only thing that these stories have in common is that they feature an alternate-reality origin for a Spider-Man (or Woman, or suit of armour, or symbiote//robot or whatever), and that they are all under threat from the Spider-Hunters, who turn up towards the end of each story, with various members of the Legion of Superior Spider-Men arriving from the 30th century to recruit any survivors at the end of the story. Not everyone makes it out, however.

Issue #3 - “Aaron Aikman - The Spider-Man” - I don’t know the background to this Spider-Man, or whether he is a new creation, but he is a scientist who builds a set of Spider-armour, operating like a sort of Iron Man. There is a fairly obvious back-story revealed during the course of the issue, and it is possible that he doesn’t make it to the Spider-Verse finale.


Edge of Spider-Verse #2 (Marvel Now, Spiderman, Spiderverse, Issue Two) 1st Printing
Edge of Spider-Verse #2 (Marvel Now, Spiderman, Spiderverse, Issue Two) 1st Printing
by Marvel Comics
Edition: Comic

4.0 out of 5 stars Issue #2 - “Gwen Stacy: Spider Woman”, 28 May 2015
The stories from issues #1-5 of the “Elseworlds” mini-series Edge of Spider-Verse are collected as Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse. This collection is a mixed-bag of stories and styles, ranging from superb to stunning in quality, apart from one, which didn’t work for me, but I suppose there has to be a Dark Spider-Man out there in the multiverse somewhere. See Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 2: Spider-Verse Prelude for the background to these stories.

The only thing that these stories have in common is that they feature an alternate-reality origin for a Spider-Man (or Woman, or suit of armour, or symbiote//robot or whatever), and that they are all under threat from the Spider-Hunters, who turn up towards the end of each story, with various members of the Legion of Superior Spider-Men arriving from the 30th century to recruit any survivors at the end of the story. Not everyone makes it out, however.

Issue #2 - “Gwen Stacy: Spider Woman”: the title tells you all you need to know. This has a modern high-school setting, with Gwen playing drums for high-school rock-band the Mary Janes (stage-costumes by Ditko!), and with Spider-Woman hunted by the police (and her father) for her part in the death of Peter Parker, the Lizard. Matt Murdock, mob lawyer, to the Kingpin puts out a hit on Captain Stacy, for various reasons that make sense in the context of the backstory.


EDGE OF SPIDER-VERSE #1 2nd Print
EDGE OF SPIDER-VERSE #1 2nd Print
by Other
Edition: Comic

5.0 out of 5 stars Issue #1 - “Spider-Man Noir”, 28 May 2015
The stories from issues #1-5 of the “Elseworlds” mini-series Edge of Spider-Verse are collected as Amazing Spider-Man: Edge of Spider-verse. This collection is a mixed-bag of stories and styles, ranging from superb to stunning in quality, apart from one, which didn’t work for me, but I suppose there has to be a Dark Spider-Man out there in the multiverse somewhere. See Amazing Spider-Man Vol. 2: Spider-Verse Prelude for the background to these stories.

The only thing that these stories have in common is that they feature an alternate-reality origin for a Spider-Man (or Woman, or suit of armour, or symbiote//robot or whatever), and that they are all under threat from the Spider-Hunters, who turn up towards the end of each story, with various members of the Legion of Superior Spider-Men arriving from the 30th century to recruit any survivors at the end of the story. Not everyone makes it out, however.

Issue #1 - “Spider-Man Noir” - is set at the time of the New York World Fair, and features a pulp hero called the Spider, with stage magician and escapologist the Magnificent Mysterio as the villain, who teams up with the Kingpin on a scheme which requires a sample of the Spider’s blood. There is much back-story (and origin) hinted at, as we meet the Ox and Felicia Hardy, as well as science-student Peter Parker, Aunt May, and Mary Jane. This was my favourite of the lot, but that might have just been because of the superb script, artwork, background setting, and pulp-era feel of it. But it was issue #2 that got its own series. Curse you, shallow fanboys!


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