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rossuk (London, UK)
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Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary)
Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary)
by Greg Beale
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good for research or reference., 28 Oct. 2010
I do have Beale, along with 40+ other commentaries on Revelation, as I wrote a commentary on Revelation myself in the 1990's. He has written the most detailed commentary on Revelation there is. He is, however, rather verbose. He relies a little too much on Daniel, and as a result he gets the mighty angel of ch. 10 wrong, by calling it/him Christ rather than Christ's angel (compare Rev 1:1 with 22:6). If I have a difficult question on Revelation then I look at Beale, Osborne and Mounce. For the scholar Beale is a must have, but most ordinary mortals will, however, find Osborne more useful. Note, Osborne also cites both Beale and Aune.

For a link to Osborne see here Revelation (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)


Life's Story 2; The Reason For The Journey [DVD] [2010]
Life's Story 2; The Reason For The Journey [DVD] [2010]
Offered by Home Entertainment Online
Price: £8.20

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A look at Life from a Christian point of view., 26 Oct. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I thought that this DVD was better than the first episode (Life's Story 1). It looks at life as designed by an Intelligent Designer, rather than a product of evolution. It compares and contrasted creation with evolution. It is not specifically young earth creationism, as the age of the earth is not mentioned; the great flood is mentioned briefly.

Part 1, looks at life in the sea and is beautifully shot in the Red Sea corals, and off the coast of Malta. It looks at fish, sharks, octopus and sea turtles, and in particular it covers the instinct of sea turtles which guides them to the beach of their birth to lay eggs'. It makes a good point when talking about how fish became land dwellers, if one crawls onto the land, then it also needs a mate who crawls out at the same time. Also, if there are plants on the land, where are the insects to pollenate them, these had not evolved by then. It also looks at examples of symbiosis which is difficult to explain by evolution.

Part 2, looks at the birds and mammals of Africa, and includes the instinct of birds who can build nests. For those brought up on a diet of David Attenborough, I get bored pretty quickly with African wildlife, but I found this fascinating. For example, white rhino young lead there mum, but black rhino young follow their mum. There is a discussion about the various antelope species, some of whom can jump and others who cannot. It also looks at the different species of Zebra; African penguins and sea lions. It looks at the differences between humans and apes. The DVD is mildly evangelistic, but not too heavy. The DVD was beautifully shot and fascinating, the script was well written, suitable for adults and kids. [There are references to animals mating and a long shot of elephants mating so I guess some PG is required]

For "Life's Story 1" see: Life's Story; The One That Hasn't Been Told [DVD] [2004]


Book of Revelation (New Century Bible)
Book of Revelation (New Century Bible)
by George R.Beasley- Murray
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Highly regarded by other commentators, 25 Oct. 2010
This was first published in 1974 just before Mounce (1977), and as former Principal of Spurgeon's College, London and Professor of NT at a Southern Baptist Seminary he has impeccable credentials. I wrote a commentary on Revelation in about 1995 and Mounce was at the top of my clutch of about 8 commentaries then. I found a copy of Beasley-Murrey, but he never found it to my main list of commentaries that I then used. I am not sure why, as Beasley-Murrey has written a decent mid-length commentary.

Since then, I looked at seven recent scholarly commentaries (1997-2005), and Beasley-Murrey was the sixth most cited author. So I clearly made a mistake in not using him more (but Mounce was the fourth most cited author).

Note: the seven recent scholarly commentators are Mounce (2nd ed), Witherington, Keener, Osborne, Kistemaker, Beale and Smalley. These days, I would go for Osborne as my first choice, followed by Mounce and then Beale for reference (he is just too verbose, but you need him for the finer points). You can Google my commentary ("Commentary on Revelation"), shameless plug I know, it is a bit outdated, but it is free, it is 200k words.


Amillennialism Today
Amillennialism Today
by William E. Cox
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good starter on Amillennialism, 23 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Amillennialism Today (Paperback)
This is a good starter on Amillenialism, if you can get it. He is very clear in his arguments, he is not a dispensationalist. A more advanced study is Kim Riddlebarger's A Case for Amillennialism: Understanding the End Times which is still available.

William E Cox has also written Biblical Studies in Final Things which covers much of the same material and he also wrote Examination of Dispensationalism


The Apocalypse of St. John: The Greek Text with Introduction Notes and Indices
The Apocalypse of St. John: The Greek Text with Introduction Notes and Indices
by Henry B Swete
Edition: Paperback
Price: £35.69

4.0 out of 5 stars Reprint of a 1907 classic, 23 Oct. 2010
A classic just preceding publication of R H Charles mammoth work. Greek, Latin and several other European languages required, strictly for the scholar, otherwise his English is concise, precise and excellent (introduction 219 pp, commentary 314 pp), Amillennial.

Even after over 100 years, Swete is still the eighth most cited author among recent scholarly commentaries.

[My review is from the original edition]


The Revelation to John
The Revelation to John
by Stephen S. Smalley
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £40.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Famine to feast, 23 Oct. 2010
This review is from: The Revelation to John (Hardcover)
Over ten years ago the best commentary on Revelation I could find was Mounce (1st ed), then we had his second edition in 1997, followed by the huge works by Beale and Aune, since then we have had other useful works by Kistemaker, Brighton, Witherington and of course Osborne. Now, Smalley treats us to another scholarly masterpiece. He has already written a commentary on John's epistles (WBC) as well as the book "John: Evangelist & Interpreter".

He follows Beale in being a modified idealist following Hendriksen, Caird, Sweet and Wilcock. He regards the author as being John the apostle and assumes an early date, but this is not noticable in his comments. His introduction is short, but he has already published "Thunder and Love" which covers much introductory material. He covers a section at a time under the headings: translation, textual variants, literary setting, comment, and theology. There are a number of useful excursuses. The commentary is based on the Greek, but the Greek is transliterated. At 633pp he is not as verbose as Beale and is far more readable. Students now have to choose between Mounce, Osborne and Smalley.

He regards the first seal as "lust for power"; Ch 7 deals with the church on earth and in heaven; the two witnesses are the witnessing church; the woman of Ch 12 is the covenant community of God from both the OT and NT; Babylon is worldly, idolatrous, oppressive powers; on Ch 20 he is amillennial.

This commentary was a big treat for me, another very useful contribution on the book of Revelation. It is a delight to read and I am still working my way through it. From famine ten years ago I have now become a glutton.

NB. If I had to chose between Mounce, Smalley and Osborne, I would go for Osborne Revelation (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)


Interpreting the Book of Revelation
Interpreting the Book of Revelation
by Kevin J. Conner
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful companion guide, 23 Oct. 2010
This book deals with the principles of interpreting Revelation (hermeneutics). The first eight chapters deal with hermeneutical problems, schools of interpretation, historical background, methods of interpretation, principles of research, structure, history or prophecy, theology of Revelation. The remainder of the book deals with the hermeneutical principles of Revelation including context, theology and figures of speech.

The book is well laid out with headings and sub-headings etc. Particularly useful is the list of Old and New Testament allusions in Revelation. Also the list of symbols used and their interpretation, and the numerology of Revelation. There is a lot in the book that will not be found in the standard commentaries.

It is of intermediate level and will suite the student approaching Revelation for the first time, or the group study leader.


The Revelation of Saint John (Black's New Testament Commentary)
The Revelation of Saint John (Black's New Testament Commentary)
by G.B. Caird
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Readable and scholarly, 23 Oct. 2010
The first edition came out 1966 and the second in 1984, the year he died. G B Caird is a well-respected NT scholar and was Dean Ireland's professor of exegesis of Holy Scripture, Oxford. At the time he wrote the first edition he thought he was swimming against the tide, but in fact he is pretty main stream. He was influenced by A M Farrer, but that is no bad thing. While scholarly, it is very readable, not much Greek and very few footnotes. He did his own translation from Greek to English, my only quibble is that he uses 'lamps' instead of 'lampstands' in 1:20, this difference is important because Jesus is the lamp (21:23). He tends to deal with a section at a time but verses are indicated and key words are in bold. It is not exhaustive or over-detailed and occasionally he has little to say, but when he has something to say he is worthwhile listening to. For the student this would not be my first choice, but if you already have a good working knowledge of Revelation you will enjoy Caird's thoughtful commentary.

Note: Among 7 recent scholarly commentaries on Revelation Caird is the fifth most cited author.

This has now been replaced by Ian Boxall's commentary, which is very good. The Revelation of Saint John (Black's New Testament Commentary)


Biblical Studies in Final Things
Biblical Studies in Final Things
by William E COX
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good primer on eschatology, 19 Oct. 2010
The writer is a former dispensationalist and writes with great clarity on issues dealing with eschatology (last things), first published in 1966 but well worth getting, as are his other books, which are sadly out of print (e.g. Amillennialism Today, Examination of Dispensationalism).

This book covers a useful range of topics: God's eternal covenant, realized eschatology, kingdom of God, Israel and the church, tribulation, antichrist, Second Coming, resurrection, judgement, Rev 20, the millennium, and the final state. The book is ~230 pages, it is clearly written and would be a useful primer on eschatology. Those wanting to find a biblical alternative to much of the current end-time fiction will find this book a breath of fresh air.

He has also written Amillennialism Today and Examination of Dispensationalism


The Revelation of ST John (Black's New Testament Commentaries)
The Revelation of ST John (Black's New Testament Commentaries)
by Ian Boxall
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good replacement for Caird's commentary, 16 Oct. 2010
First, I would say that I found this commentary immensely enjoyable and readable. Ian Boxall is a young scholar at Oxford university as was the late G B Caird, whose commentary he is replacing in the Black's New Testament series. I used G B Caird's commentary some ten or more years ago. I would have to say that I was far more able to interact with Ian's commentary than Caird's. Caird's commentary was a far more reflective commentary than Ian's and Caird sometimes offers almost no comment at all. In Ian's commentary I can see a young scholar struggling with the difficulties that Revelation presents to all scholars as they grapple with the many difficulties that this book brings, and as a result I found it a delight to read.

He does deal with most of the alternative views and in most cases he comes to a pretty orthodox solution at least to scholars, but not the popular world. The book of Revelation is about the Church, in all its imperfection, and about its enemies, persecution from the outside and seduction from the inside. The books format is very good, key texts are in bold. He does use his own translation of the Greek text (he calls the lampstands "menorahs"). There is a good bibliography and three indexes. He also provides 8 very useful tables. There are no footnotes, and the Greek text is not transliterated (an oversight of the editor I think, although there is not much of it).

The introduction is pretty short but he covers the key points. Ian does get the plot wrong when he says that the olive branch in Ch 11 is an emblem of peace (surely it symbolises the Holy Spirit in the witness of God's people as in Acts 1:8). But, to his credit, he says that the mighty angel of Ch 10 is not Jesus but his angel, based on Rev 1:1 and 22:16, unlike Beale who insists on calling this angel Christ, and Beale is clearly wrong here because he relies too much on Daniel and not on the text of Revelation itself. The Ch 10 angel is clearly Christ's angel.

Here are some of his other conclusions. The rider on the first horse represents false Christ's, even the antichrist. The 144,000 is the church (those in allegiance to the slaughtered Lamb). The great multitude is a vision of the 144,000 after the great tribulation. (I think it was Brighton who summarised Ch 7 so well by saying it represents the "Militant church on earth and the church triumphant in heaven). The two witnesses are the church. Babylon is not Rome; rather Rome represents the latest incarnation of the oppressive and idolatrous city. He is somewhat agnostic on the millennium, but so was Caird (I also think the millennium is highly overrated). He also uses the liturgical motif and the exodus motif as did Caird. He also recognises the influence of Ezekiel in the book and he recognises some degree of recapitulation (as did Hendriksen). He also understands the symbolism of numbers in Revelation. He can also contrast the whore Babylon with the Bride the New Jerusalem. As an evangelical

I wish that he had gone a bit further on the missionary meaning of the four-fold message of the "great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages", which is one of the keys to evangelism and the great commission today. So who should buy this? This volume is far more useful to the student than Caird was because it covers almost every important topic and gives the various arguments for different interpretations which Caird never did. While not so detailed as Osborne, I think that this would make a very useful starter for students, especially as he is so readable and students studying Revelation for the first time will not get bogged down with unnecessary detail. Scholars will like it because he interacts with a lot of the recent secondary literature. It is more difficult to decide if the preacher will find it useful, he does not really have the space in this volume to go into application, but suffice it to say that he does recognise that Revelation was written to complacent Christians as well as persecuted ones. From a preacher's perspective, I just wish he had gone a little bit further. Overall, another useful contribution, given its size, that will give students a good introduction to Revelation. He has also published "Revelation: Vision and Insight: Vision and Insight - An Introduction to the Apocalypse" (176 pp 2002)

It should also be noted that John Glynn in his Commentary & Reference Survey: A Comprehensive Guide to Biblical and Theological Resources_ also recommends this as an expositional commentary.


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