Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Learn more Fitbit
Profile for Hugo Nebulous > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Hugo Nebulous
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,142,486
Helpful Votes: 17

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Hugo Nebulous (Telford UK)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Crushed Mexican Spiders: & Possibly Forty Ships
Crushed Mexican Spiders: & Possibly Forty Ships
Price: £4.99

2.0 out of 5 stars A Curate's Egg, 2 Feb. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was disappointed by the length of this book, essentially one very short story and another moderately short story so it works out quite expensive. Enjoyed Forty Ships, which read like classic Tibor Fischer but the shorter story at the start just read like an amputated chapter from a novel and left me neither satisfied nor wanting more. After loving his previously novels so much, this was a bit if a let down.


Sane New World: Taming the Mind
Sane New World: Taming the Mind
Price: £2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars I really enjoyed this. A great introduction to mindfulness based cognitive ..., 10 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I really enjoyed this. A great introduction to mindfulness based cognitive therapy that will make you want to read on.


Dark Lies the Island
Dark Lies the Island
by Kevin Barry
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sad to finish it. Envy those who haven't read it yet., 11 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dark Lies the Island (Paperback)
I'd rather fallen out of love with short stories, for no apparent reason. Then I tried Dark Lies the Island after a recommendation from a friend. Gone in two sittings and I promptly added the rest of his work to my basket. Some of the stories are truly dark whilst others are as touching as an old Yellow Pages ad. They are ordered perfectly, like the songs on a well thought out album making the collection hang together as a whole. I'm never very keen on comparisons but a couple of other writers did spring to mind - Alan Warner and William Gay who I both really admire. Easily my book of the year. Kevin Barry fully deserves the IMPAC award for which he is currently shortlisted.


Last Days
Last Days
by Adam Nevill
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nevill's Best Yet, 2 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Last Days (Paperback)
Last Days is that rarest of creatures - a book that delivers the pace and accessibility of compelling genre fiction along with the rich rewards of the best literary novels. I'll say nothing about the plot, other than to warn that it grips from the outset and doesn't let up until the story's disturbing conclusion.

Nevill's success is founded on a unique imagination and an exceptional writing talent that creates dialogue so natural and descriptions so vivid that the reader's disbelief is rapidly and permanently suspended. The book also seems thoroughly researched and this adds a real authenticity to both Kyle's film making and to the Mansonesque commune that is his subject - so much so that you might have to look up cults of the 60s and 70s on Wikipedia to separate the truth from the imaginary.

The author has been compared favourably with some of the biggest names in horror and whilst it's true to say he's that good, to say he is anything like them is not. Last Days does not resemble the work of "Britain's Stephen King", but it might be that of M R James on acid transcribing the nightmares of Cormack McCarthy.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 28, 2012 4:52 AM BST


The Ritual: Now A Major Film, The Most Thrilling Chiller You'll Read This Year
The Ritual: Now A Major Film, The Most Thrilling Chiller You'll Read This Year
by Adam Nevill
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SIX STARS - BOOK OF THE YEAR, 30 May 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Every once in a while, I enjoy a story so much I get the strange feeling that the author has written it specifically with my enjoyment in mind. The Ritual is just such a book.

It is something of a departure from Nevill's last (also immensely enjoyable) novel Apartment 16. The elegant prose and M R Jamesian subtleties have made way to an altogether more brutal creature. From Page 1 we are seized by the rucsack straps and dragged into an unimaginably sinister wilderness. Relentless pace, convincing characterization and exceptional dialogue compel the reader to stay there. I just could not leave this book alone, devouring it in just two white-knuckle sittings.

Amongst all the action, Nevill reflects on some pretty big ideas; friendship, career, family, regret. That the thrills and the philosophy never get in each others' way (indeed, that they enhance each other) is what elevates The Ritual, and its author, above the vast majority of horror writing. One is left thinking, "this guy is way too good for genre fiction" though I, for one, am glad that's what he is writing.

Hands down, my favourite book of the year and I cannot see it being surpassed.


Apartment 16
Apartment 16
by Adam Nevill
Edition: Paperback

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BRILLIANT HORROR!, 6 Jun. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Apartment 16 (Paperback)
Apartment 16 is an exquisitely crafted horror novel to be read in huge late-night chunks. Often truly chilling, it is rightly being heralded as a long-awaited innovation on the haunted house story. An intriguing plot and genuinely frightening scenes are delivered in a manner which has inevitably drawn comparisons with masters of the genre such M R James and H P Lovecraft, but which retains contemporary pace and edge. There are no zombies chasing cheerleaders here, only ghastly things, too terrible to comprehend, seen flitting in the corner of the eye, glimpsed in dimly lit stairwells or heard making muffled sounds behind closed doors. The rich, visceral language quickly drags us down into the dark and disturbing undertow of the writer's imagination.

In addition to being a great horror novel, the Apartment 16 delivers on many other levels. The consideration of art history has a scholarly, well-researched ring to it without ever descending into a lecture. Thought provoking meditations on mental illness, urban living, regret, ambition and class are all woven into the narrative so as never interrupt its flow. London gothic has not been done so well since Peter Ackroyd's Hawksmoor. Nevill's heartbreaking and grotesque depiction of a life gone wrong in a harsh, indifferent city is, perhaps, the real horror that lies at the core of this exceptional book.


Page: 1