Profile for Fredrik Nath > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Fredrik Nath
Top Reviewer Ranking: 15,280
Helpful Votes: 148

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Fredrik Nath "Fredrik Nath" (UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8
pixel
Legionary: The Scourge of Thracia (Legionary 4)
Legionary: The Scourge of Thracia (Legionary 4)
Price: £1.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book itself about holding the mountain passes of Thrace is one of his best. The rising tension (see Egri, 18 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've read a few books by this author. He's prolific and his writing has matured and become enriched with historical detail about a time and place no one else seems to write about.
The book itself about holding the mountain passes of Thrace is one of his best. The rising tension (see Egri:'The Art of Dramatic Writing') grabs you early and it is a fascinating read. I guess writing tense thrilling stories is as much an art as a technique and Mr Docherty has clearly mastered it in this stunning piece of historical fiction.
Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in Rome and the Romans.
It is a good read even if Romans 'ain't yo thang'.
Fredrik Nath (Author of the 'Amulet' series).


Do It Yourself Laguiole knife kit
Do It Yourself Laguiole knife kit
Offered by ELIZAS
Price: £22.90

5.0 out of 5 stars He won't put it together because he likes the set as it is, 20 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought for a friend who is knife mad! He won't put it together because he like the set as it is!
Nicely presented and packaged.
It's a beautiful blade too.


War at the Edge of the World: Part Two: The remaining two parts of Book One of the Twilight of Empire series, set in Roman Britain, AD 305.
War at the Edge of the World: Part Two: The remaining two parts of Book One of the Twilight of Empire series, set in Roman Britain, AD 305.
Price: £2.39

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent novel. well-written in most respects, 20 Jan. 2015
An excellent novel. well-written in most respects. Does have a bit of passive voice which should have been changed by the editor.
The characterisation is very good -Castus has a clear strong voice.
The action is clear and present and the descriptive prose is good too.
Recommend this story (two purchases) to anyone who loves Roman adventures.


Mickey Take: When a debt goes bad...
Mickey Take: When a debt goes bad...
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Debut Novel, 21 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I must confess to some bias having met the author once several years ago and corresponded with him briefly since.
This is a thriller that will enthral - it's hard to put down once started - so beware! It is well-structured and the narrative prose like the dialogue are excellent. The story content keeps you on the edge of your seat throughout. In short, an excellent debut novel. Highly recommended.
Fredrik Nath - author of: 'Galdir - a Slave's Tale'.


SCART Splitter - 2 Way, Non-Switched, RGB Support
SCART Splitter - 2 Way, Non-Switched, RGB Support
Offered by i.Lifeuk
Price: £3.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent product., 6 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent - does exactly what it says on the tin!


Individuation and Narcissism: The Psychology of Self in Jung and Kohut
Individuation and Narcissism: The Psychology of Self in Jung and Kohut
Price: £28.49

3.0 out of 5 stars Poor Value for Money., 6 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book would have been a clear well researched review of modern psychological thinking on narcissism. Unfortunately in the kindle version the translation is appalling. The formatting is amateurish and instead of the word 'the' it says 'die'. There are numerous other typos where there are Germanic words instead of English. It makes it unnecessarily hard going. If it had been translated properly, without typos and formatted properly I would have given 5 stars because it is a light-weight summarising version of much of Kohut's work.
For the price it is poor value for money.


Paroles (Pocket Poets) (City Lights Pocket Poets Series)
Paroles (Pocket Poets) (City Lights Pocket Poets Series)
by Jacques Prevert
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic French Poems!, 20 Aug. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought my first copy of this book in the '90s. I return to it often and many of the poems are firm favourites of mine. The translation by beat poet Ferlinghetti (sp?) is superb and many of the nuances of Prevert's wording come through with clarity and charm.
Prevert never shrank away from hard or emotive subjects and reading his poems gives insight into who he was and the time in which he lived.
I have found this book inspiring, clever, and above all a lesson in clarity of writing. He paints pictures in our minds with such simple words and phrases. Those pictures are often stark and bleak but nonetheless as clear as if you could reach out and touch them.
My favourite? I love this book so much I have two - 'Alicante' for it's romance and 'Lazy Morning' for it's reality.
Can't recommend this book more strongly to any one who, like me, has an emotional view on life and death but whose French is rudimentary.
I used quotes from Paroles as chapter starts in one of my books (Farewell Bergerac) because the face of my MC in my head fitted well with pictures of Prevert that I have seen.


Older, Wiser, Sexier (Women)
Older, Wiser, Sexier (Women)
by Bev Williams
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Really Funny!, 5 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
You may think I'm stupid, but I bought this for my lovely missus on our anniversary.
It's a funny, intelligent glance-through of very poignant cartoons.
Hope she won't be furious - I'm sure she won't be - she has a sense of humour.
:-)


A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4)
A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4)
Price: £3.66

3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but has he lost his way?, 1 Mar. 2014
I enjoyed the first three books. They were well written, each chapter leaving you on a cliff-hanger and drawing you into the story. I've found the pace a bit slow in all of them and skip the details of clothing etc. as it becomes tedious (to me) in the end. The character development is the best part of GRRM's books IMO but I can empathise with his tiring of certain characters and killing them off.
The trouble with maintaining impetus in a book series - and this is where historical fiction and fantasy fiction dichotomise - is that in historical books you have a backdrop of real events and it is the writing which maintains the character development. Maybe with historical fiction you have a rigid story arc and it makes you have to create more malleable characters. In fantasy fiction the author goes into free-fall because it's his world and he can do with it as he wills. In Fire and Ice the first three books were great; there was good admixture of action, character and description.
Not so in Feast for Crows. The action has slowed and he's concentrated on the descriptive prose and adding new characters we probably don't care too much about, at the expense of characters one is set up to like in the first three books. I say this because readers invest time in becoming attached to a character and when the story moves on without a good resolution for them, the reader loses interest in the whole book.
In my own 'Galdir ' series I've found in the fourth book, that it's equally hard to maintain character impetus. I think maybe it's because having now abandoned the 'trilogy' idea one is aware that the rest of the books won't conclude in the same way. If as a fantasy writer, you know you have time to change events later, you maybe don't get around to concluding in a satisfactory way.
In this book, GRRM is still building his world and still teasing a bit with characters he intends to write about in future books. The trouble here is not character development or even plot - it's pace. The pace here is slow and cumbersome with mainly descriptive prose and dialogue which does not move the over all plot line along. Much of the plot development expressed through the dialogue is repetitious. We know how the familiar characters tick already - they don't have to keep showing the same character traits all the time in dialogue.
Maybe my own impatience shows through in the pacing of my books. GRRM is clearly a very patient guy but he doesn't have the right to expect his readers to be so patient when in this fourth book, the going is slow - slow - slow.
Will I read the next one? - probably out of curiosity and the hope that the pace will improve.
Compared to the others this book isn't as good a read but for fans - well, it'll do until the series continues. let's hope the next one is pacey with enough action to sustain. This one isn't.


Hobby Writing: How To Make Your Play, Pay!
Hobby Writing: How To Make Your Play, Pay!
Price: £2.39

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent small guide!, 21 Feb. 2014
Hobby Writing
I was given a copy of this short book to review by the author. I don’t know the chap but was interested to read his book. I did find it a pleasant, interesting book packed with good advice for newbies and professionals alike. It’s a quick easy read.

Ian Barnett has written a very useful guide for any writer who wants to make money from writing about his/her hobby. Mr Barnett knows the business which is clear from the concise nature of what is in essence a short book on the subject.

The book covers where to start, how to write the subject matter and gives advice on how to get articles and books published on the subject. It covers using mind maps and how to set about e-publishing. The system of working he describes is personal and won’t suit everyone but it is a helpful to see how someone else tackles the job.

This book is full of good advice whether you are writing short stories, magazine articles or short books on a hobby topic close to your heart.

Recommend it!


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8