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Red Fox (Britain)

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Nasal Strips Large Clear (60 Strips/£0.21 each) by Sleepeze Remedies® - PREMIUM QUALITY - Stop Snoring Nasal Dilators Suitable for Sleep Apnea Relief And Treatment, Insomnia And These Snore Strips Helps Stop Snoring - Nasal Congestion Aids That Wont Let You Down - Fits Medium And Large Size Noses - Buy 2 Get FREE Delivery And 10% Off Your Purchase
Nasal Strips Large Clear (60 Strips/£0.21 each) by Sleepeze Remedies® - PREMIUM QUALITY - Stop Snoring Nasal Dilators Suitable for Sleep Apnea Relief And Treatment, Insomnia And These Snore Strips Helps Stop Snoring - Nasal Congestion Aids That Wont Let You Down - Fits Medium And Large Size Noses - Buy 2 Get FREE Delivery And 10% Off Your Purchase
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2.0 out of 5 stars Very disappointing, 2 April 2016
These are nowhere near the quality of the "Breathe Right" strips although being a lot cheaper. They very rarely stay on for long and are too large despite being described as medium to large-they are on the upper end of large. I will be going back to buying the Breathe Right strips as I suppose you get what you pay for. Very disappointing.


The Callanish Dance: The Cycle of the Year Celebrated in the Sacred Landscapes of the Western Isles
The Callanish Dance: The Cycle of the Year Celebrated in the Sacred Landscapes of the Western Isles
by Gill Smith
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A gem of a book, 26 Jun. 2015
This is a lovely little book that Jill Smith has written. It is a breath of fresh air to actually read an earth mysteries book that is written from the heart rather than the head. Her personal story in relation to Callanish and the years before, leading up to her living there are detailed very honestly. Although primarily concerned with her living the "wheel of the year" on Lewis, her feelings and reactions will resonate with people who have felt pulled, maybe dragged to a certain place that insinuates itself in your blood. I think I am correct in thinking that after a period spent in Glastonbury after her ten years on Lewis, she has now returned. Reading the last chapter in this book, I cannot say that I am surprised.

In conclusion, this is a little gem of a book that will appeal to people who actually feel the pull of place rather than just intellectualising about it.


Kocaso MIDPAD M9000 Tablet (White) - (AMD 1.2GHz, 8GB RAM, 8GB Memory, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich)
Kocaso MIDPAD M9000 Tablet (White) - (AMD 1.2GHz, 8GB RAM, 8GB Memory, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich)

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars stay away, 16 Oct. 2013
Ok, so this is cheap for a nine inch screen tablet but that's really the only thing going for it. The browser is horribly slow even though I have a reasonably good wifi connection via a three mifi dongle. Often it shows not in range when only a few feet away with a good signal. Downloading chrome and firefox works slightly better but not much. I could go on but I think I've highlighted how frustrating the thing is. It seems now it is unavailable on Amazon which is lucky if anyone should be tempted. All in all I would say avoid and spend a little more if possible.


Darker Than You Think (Fantasy Masterworks): And Other Novels
Darker Than You Think (Fantasy Masterworks): And Other Novels
by Jack Williamson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strange ripples from this novel, 18 Nov. 2012
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I read very little fiction but was led to this strange work whilst reading about Aleister Crowley and Jack Parsons and the "Babalon Working".
As has been detailed elsewhere, it is basically a book of lycanthropy or so it seems. However, when one realises the effect that it supposedly had on Jack Parsons and his notion of The Witchcraft and more importantly his obsession and eventual demise via the Holy Whore Herself, Babalon then it becomes more intriguing.

April Bell, the red haired otherworldly witch in the novel appears to be a prototype of what Parsons was trying to achieve with the Babalon Working ie creating/invoking the Babalon force into a living incarnation. It is said his endeavours were fruitful with the appearance of Marjorie Cameron; a red haired woman a la April Bell. The premise of the novel is that of witches being "other" and set apart from "normal" humanity and to my reading at least, it seems that the Child of Night is referencing the light bringer, Lucifer, god of witchcraft and beast to Babalon. I would consider this to be an essential read for anyone interested in witchcraft and the oft overlooked current that Parsons breathed new life into that is being carried on and updated today.

Also, apart from anything else it is a real rollicking read that to my eyes does not betray the era that it was written in. It can be read as a straightforward enjoyable, if somewhat unsettling read or if one is of an occult persuassion i would suggest that there are some very interesting themes running through it. Enjoy!


Craft of the Untamed: An inspired vision of traditional witchcraft
Craft of the Untamed: An inspired vision of traditional witchcraft
by Nicholaj de Mattos Frisvold
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear..., 18 Nov. 2012
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I was gently steered away from this book by someone who knows better than me but i wouldn't have it. So, £25 lighter, here is my review. First off, the price is unjustifiable. The print being larger than average means you do not actually get twenty five pounds worth of content. It should have been issued as a cheaper paperback in my opinion. As another reviewer has said on Amazon US, the writer can be quite superb (see his "Pomba Gira and the Quimbanda of Mbumba Nzila", a brilliant exposition of the Brazilian Pomba Gira cult)but it is painfully obvious that this offering was not edited at all by Mandrake; a prerequisite for a non native speaker and expensive tome.

It comes across as being quite a hotch potch of ideas with no guiding thread and meanders down various avenues, sometimes confusingly out of the blue. There are definately some hidden gems in this although they are very easy to miss given the appalling lack of editing. I have given it 3 stars purely on the basis of the last 5 pages (the chapter entitled "The Icon of the Witch" and Mr Frisvold's "Farewell") which are quite superb in identifying and locating the witch as "other" and is not dissimilar to the way Jules Michelet portrays the revolutionary witch in "The Sorceress" and also nods in the direction of Jack Parsons. One small quote from Mr. Frisvold from these last pages exemplifies what this book could have been: "...(they) provoke modern man by their love of wildness, the freedom of woods and springs, rejecting morals and profane law in favour of the freedom given by Venus and the nymphs. Herein we find the true secrets of witchcraft, natural freedom and the realisation of oneself as a fair being."

This book could have been so much better if given a proper "going over" before publishing. However, do not let this put you off reading some of Mr.Frisvold's other works, particularly "Pomba Gira" and "Palo Mayombe".


Treading the Mill: Practical CraftWorking in Modern Traditional Witchcraft
Treading the Mill: Practical CraftWorking in Modern Traditional Witchcraft
by Nigel G. Pearson
Edition: Paperback

6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very disappointing, 5 Nov. 2012
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I obtained this book on the strength of the good reviews on here. I really should have thought twice as i vowed off buying Capall Bann products a number of years ago. The style is quite patronising; it feels like the author is talking to a bunch of school children in parts. Im sure his style is not meant to be patronising but unfortunately i found it to be so. Im going to get very picky now beacuse i will fess up and admit to skipping a number of pages-23 pages on wine making in a Witchcraft book; for goodness sake; that sort of thing belongs in a country craft book.

Witchcraft and witches are "other", they stand outside or on the periphery of society. To be a witch is rebellion and not as Ronald Hutton and others may wish, to be a gentle reminder of "Merrie England". There is little in the book that you would not find in a Wicca 101 product, even though it is dressed up as "traditional"-the hip term in the latest post-wicca publishing scene.

One part in particular riled me immensely, even though it was a quote used by the author made by someone called Adam Thorne of Hagstone; the silliness of the quote bears repeating: "I appreciate that it's all raving, ripping, raping and rending but this is what the male mysteries are all about and the poor old goddess is on the receiving end!...students of the old craft realise that goddess energy is passive energy...well, most of the time" This type of utter nonsense stems from some weird male supremacy fantasy. The Goddess is all encompasing and is fiery, lustful, energetic, active and is mistress of the beast. Maybe Mr Thorne hasnt encountered or heard about Lilith or Babalon?

I could go on to nitpick more, but i think that these two instances highlight my disappointment with the book.
It's ok if you want a superficial introduction to country lore and another "soft" book on the recuperated witch but if its authentic blood and guts (and more besides) witchcraft i would suggest investigating the work of Jack Parsons and Jules Michelet ("The Sorceress"); you wont find recipes or tools in said books but you will find actual, unerecuperated witchcraft in them. I would also recommend the essay "Raw Power" by Peter Grey; an enlightening read on Witchcraft, Babalon and Female Sexuality (google it if interested).
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 8, 2012 10:54 PM GMT


The Red Goddess
The Red Goddess
by Peter Grey
Edition: Paperback

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Homage to Babalon, 30 Oct. 2012
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This review is from: The Red Goddess (Paperback)
I have read this book by Peter Grey three times now and come away from it each time feeling very inspired and mildly irritated at the same time. This is really my problem, not the authors doing. I have commented on one of the thoughtful 2 star reviews on amazon.com but felt it was high time to do a review to rectify the balance a bit in favour of TRG. Peter divides the book up into 3 sections: Book 1 dealing with the history and pre history of Babalon's evolution via Inanna, Ishtar, Astarte and so on and easily shows the linkage to these particular Ladies. This is a very strong portion of the book and a short piece within it, entitled "All the Goddesses are not one Goddess" lays to rest the oft repeated mantra of "psychological paganism" first stated by Dion Fortune that they are the same being in different garb (I feel Ms. Fortune has possibly been co-opted by neo paganism in this regard however). Book 2 traces Babalon's evolution from the Biblical era right up to the "modern" era giving details of those who have sought to know Her. Simon Magus, Kelley and Dee, Crowley and Jack Parsons. Parson's himself deserves to be known a lot better within British Witchcraft but has been sadly neglected. Peter provides enough information to springboard one's investigations further. Book 3 is highly personal and deals with Peter's obvious devotion and the methods that can be used in pursuit of the same. This section of the book is one that irritates me but im gradually getting over it as all he his doing is laying out for all to see the methods that CAN be used rather than MUST. She will tell you what She wants and if you cant deliver then in all likelihood one will find that you are not meant to either devote yourself or attempt to work with the flame haired Lady that is Babalon.

Peter does indulge in some hyperbolic language and (not misplaced, imo) humour, particularly in Book 3 but thats because, as i see it, he is attempting to cajol and possibly use "shock and awe" on a somewhat staid Pagan readership that is more used to fluffy, unchallenging surrogate mummy goddesses.

The reaction to this can be seen in some of the reviews on .com. In a way, reflecting on the more thoughtful points raised in them, I feel that a big part of the point of the book has been missed. The language and style that Peter uses is certainly not for everyone but that said it makes for an easy read and is somewhat of a turbulent ride (as you would expect with Babalon). In my opinion this is a very worthwhile read if you want to be shaken out of a stereotypical fluffy pagan rut and/or learn about a little known Goddess within mainstream pagnism etc., but it doesnt take prisoners and kills a few "holy cows" to boot.

Peter's subsequent writings expand on what is in TRG and as he has pointed out on numerous occassions, this Lady of flame is a Goddess of our time as we find ourselves within the "unfurling petals of the apocalyptic rose".
I have both the "Solstice" hardback and the gloriously artful paperback which is available at "normal prices" from Scarlet Imprint. I would add that i am nothing whatsoever to do with SI but an avid reader of Peter's work which is "of the moment" and insightful. The Red Goddess is unique and a testament to the authors devotion to Her.
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West Kennet Long Barrow: Landscape, Shamans and the Cosmos
West Kennet Long Barrow: Landscape, Shamans and the Cosmos
by Peter Knight
Edition: Paperback

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 19 Aug. 2012
I really wanted to like this book as West Kennet Long Barrow is a wonderful place that i visit often and have done for many years. Peter Knight is obviously a great enthusiast and like me has a love of the Land in the area. The book though comes over as a mish mash of other peoples ideas (which he does acknowledge) and his gushing comments such as "Nice one Paul!" in response to a Paul Devereux quote and "Touche Terence" when referring to a Terence Meaden quote. Its all very irritating and reads like a long schoolboy essay. I dont doubt for one minute that people experience many different effects in the Barrow (a friend of mine was one such person)but the way they are presented in the book without discretion makes you wonder what exactly the point is of detailing them all. When he gets on to discussions of channelling and crop circles i was all but ready to stop reading.

I dont know what i was expecting from the book if im honest. I do not like reading "dry" academic tomes with no soul but neither do i like reading new age, gushing indiscrimant texts such as this. I still feel the best way to approach sacred areas such as WKLB is with a clear, discriminatory mind and an open heart and let whatever the Land has to offer speak to you.

I feel the book is a missed opportunity in some respects but i cannot fault the authors enthusiasm.

One final point; crop formations appear near to prehistoric sites because the folk who make the formations put them there and they do in fact enhance the beauty and sacredness of the Land but just like The Barrow itself, they are human creations.


3 Ft Tubular Heater 3Ft 180 Watts Cream
3 Ft Tubular Heater 3Ft 180 Watts Cream

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poorly made, 12 Feb. 2012
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I ordered this item a few weeks ago and it was delivered promptly. Ive only just got around to getting it out of the packaging and "putting it together". The item comes with a cable and a plug. The cable has to be cut to expose the earth, negative and live cables to fit into the unit. Also, the same has to be done to fit to the plug which does not come attached to the cable. I could be wrong here but i was under the impression that all electrical units now sold in the UK have to come with the plug pre-attached. OK, its a simple enough job. However, the instructions for fitting the cable to the unit are not concise enough. Furthermore, something is rattling around inside the tube so i do not feel it is safe to use the unit.
I wouldn't recommend this item at all and would suggest you purchase one from a reputable DIY store where all the units will come "ready to go" and with no messing around with wires and plugs necessary.


Marsh Tales and Other Wonders
Marsh Tales and Other Wonders
by Walter William Melnyk
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant follow up to "The Apple and The Thorn", 5 April 2010
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This is a brilliant follow up to "The Apple and The Thorn" that William co-authored with Emma Restall-Orr. Writing alone this time he has written a beautiful follow up detailing the Wisdom of Avalon in the various Marsh Tales. Each tale itself seems to have an air of authenticity about it appearing as if the author has reached into some ancient
stream to manifest them again. The story behind the tales concerns the continuing westward push of Roman forces into Britain and the threat posed to Avalon itself as a sanctuary of the Priestesses and keepers of the ancient wisdom. It is a very well crafted, believable tale and to call it fiction is to do it an injustice as it carries the air of being a Teaching Tale in the best tradition of its type. Very highly recommended for all who are drawn to the Avalonian mysteries and the ancient lore of this beautiful Land.


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