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Profile for Nadia Al Hazmi > Reviews

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Nadia Al Hazmi (Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)
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The Interpretation of Murder
The Interpretation of Murder
by Jed Rubenfeld
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.18

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It will end up gripping you, 14 July 2007
At the beginning I thought: 'What is all the hype about???!' I didn't like the introduction of the character of Freud in the novel, I thought it was stretching it quite a bit in the attempt of writing something 'different'. That feeling never left me, I still believe that had that part of the story been omitted it would have been a gripping read nonetheless. Just before the middle of the book it gets quite interesting, to the point that you surf through the last chapters with the necessity of knowing who did it? It is not a bad read, but a little overdone in places. Plus, I am not so fond of the Freudian theories!


Why Me, Why This, Why Now?: A Guide to Answering Life's Toughest Questions
Why Me, Why This, Why Now?: A Guide to Answering Life's Toughest Questions
by Robin Norwood
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been written better, 14 July 2007
The meaning within the book is fundamental for everyone. Things do happen for a reason, if we only open our eyes to see and accept. But ms. Norwood has written the book as a trail she herself was following so I found it hard to follow and uninteresting. I recommend the last chapter, as it is the only one that made me feel the book was worth reading.
I love philosophy, but sometimes it is just too much!
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 19, 2011 11:36 PM BST


Falcon at the Portal (Amelia Peabody)
Falcon at the Portal (Amelia Peabody)
by Elizabeth Peters
Edition: Paperback

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I can't believe I found this!, 21 May 2007
Ok, ok... I bought this book by chance in a bookstore in London that had the infamous '3 for 2' deal that always gets me into trouble! Desperate not to let a good deal go, I grabbed the first book I found on the shelf, and it was 'The Falcon at the Portal' by Elizabeth Peters. The book stayed on my shelf for nearly a year, every time I picked it up I thought it might be a bit 'silly' seing how it dealt with Egypt and archeologists... Thinking it might be a disappointing literary exercise, I let the months drag on. But finally, a few weeks ago, I started reading.

Let me dissipate any doubts, the book is exquisitely written. I like verbose books, I like to swim in clear and engaging language and Elizabeth Peters writes in a manner that seems inherited from 19th century English literature! She has a good prose, I never got bored, not even when she described archeological terms and endavours in detail. The characters are so appealing, each with his/her own very loud particulars and the story is beautifully weaved around romance, mystery and murder! I believe that being able to engage the reader on all these levels, language, characters and plot, is a very rare talent indeed in these times! One is usually sacrificed for the other, but Peters seems to be able to perfect them all!

I couldn't put the book down, and that is a 5 star to me. I am definitely purchasing the whole series... I feel like someone who just won the jackpot!!!


The Laws of Simplicity (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life)
The Laws of Simplicity (Simplicity: Design, Technology, Business, Life)
by John Maeda
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.56

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Simple and philosophical, 21 May 2007
This was a very informative read, especially for someone like me, who thinks no deeper than 'how cute' the ipod looks and 'how many tasks' my funky mobile phone can do! Yet, oblivious to the majority of us, a lot of thought and accuracy go into technology and technological gadgets. This book presents us with 10 laws to seeing, doing and thinking things simple. Most references are to devices we use everyday without too much thought. John Maeda writes very well and very clearly, he has the stamp of an MIT professor! Yet what I probably enjoyed the most was his sometimes abstract way of writing which made me feel like I was watching an abstract piece of art that gave some space to my personal interpretation. A good book I recomend to anyone who wants to explore something 'different'!


Can You Keep A Secret?
Can You Keep A Secret?
by Sophie Kinsella
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book is a treat!!!, 26 April 2007
This review is from: Can You Keep A Secret? (Paperback)
If you work a lot like me, then this is a light breeze at the end of a long day! A tyoical Sophie Kinsella book, funny, gripping and totally nuts! The heroine in this particular book is Emma, a wildly imaginative girl who spills all her secrets out to a complete stranger! The repercussions are, of course, totally hilarious!!! It is true that Sophie Kinsella's books run along the same types of plots, but hey, they are still pleasurable! They are the snack during an arduous day! I greatly recommend it to unwind and let your mind simply idle along, and many-a-times, lough out loud!!!


I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts On Being a Woman
I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts On Being a Woman
by Nora Ephron
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Light read, 11 April 2007
I must admit I expected better. The title certainly builds up the anticipation, and some chapters were truly very funny. But I didn't 'laugh out loud' which really funny books make me do. The topics are real enough, but maybe too personalised to fit the title. I was hoping for more on the 'feeling bad about your body' part. It is in essence a book about growing 'wiser' and I get the feeling it was written with both the need to make it funny, but the anguish that the years are getting on. The last chapter, I guess, sums up what I felt from the beginning of the book... that lurking feeling under all the words... The book has a serious undertone that undermines the 'fun' of the title. But I guess you'll have to read it to see if you agree with me!


The Shopaholic and Baby
The Shopaholic and Baby
by Sophie Kinsella
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The 'vintage' of the series!, 11 April 2007
I-JUST-LOVED-IT

Sophie Kinsella delivers! This is (to me) the funniest of the series yet, probably because it is quite grounded. Becky Bloomwood, our shop-addict, is pregnant and getting into the usual nebulus of her overly vivid imagination! She grabs us at the beginning of the book and we are sent spiralling into the palpitations, the shock, the cought breath of all her paranoia (or is it?!)... I couldn't put it down, I just couldn't. The story teases you into simply getting to the last page! Fantastic! I probably enjoyed the 'commonness' of the problems she and Luke had, and the 'it doesn't have to end like a fairy-tale' feeling...

ABSOLUTE MUST-READ!!!!!!!!!


Talk To The Hand. The Utter Bloody Rudeness of Everyday Life
Talk To The Hand. The Utter Bloody Rudeness of Everyday Life
by Lynne Truss
Edition: Hardcover

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars So insightful!!!, 21 Mar. 2007
Let us face it, we have all thought, at some point or other, that there is something alarmingly wrong with today's society! Whether it is the vulgar verbosity of the youth, or their complete disregard for anyone other than themselves, we have returned home more than once totally flabbergasted!!!

Lynne Truss has articulately dissected the core reasons behind today's collapse of manners and has wittingly opened my eyes to facts I was blissfully unaware of!!! In the midst of the laughter I was shocked at the revelations and sudden awareness that befell me!

The book is a bit tedious at times, so it was not smooth-sailing all the way, and I felt that some paragraphs dragged for the sole purpose of giving the book some length. But in the end, you come out of this reading exercise with a more focussed and sensitive view to the surrounding society!!!


The Rise And Fall Of A Yummy Mummy
The Rise And Fall Of A Yummy Mummy
by Polly Williams
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fresh and light, 27 Feb. 2007
This is good 'in-between reading' the kind of book I like reading when I need to unwind and phase my thoughts out! It is very light and fresh, a quick read with an engaging story. The plot revolves around new mummy Amy Crane, her rocky relationship with her boyfriend, her rise to becoming a 'yummy mummy' and her fall when her priorities and confused realities fall into place.

A great 'past-time' book!!!


I Saw Ramallah
I Saw Ramallah
by Mourid Barghouti
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Leaves you speechless, 23 Feb. 2007
This review is from: I Saw Ramallah (Paperback)
Words of wisdom have a way of entering our lives, just when the view becomes out of focus and we are drawn into the monotony of day-to-day life. This is my introduction to my feelings towards Palestine.

These feelings were awakened in me after reading an excellent book by Mourid Barghouti, the famous Palestinian poet. "I saw Ramallah". It is touching but most of all, very personal; an unattached account of what Palestinians go through today. Here is an excerpt from the book that touched my soul:

"So, when Yitzhak Rabin spoke so eloquently of the tragedy of Israelis as absolute victims, and the eyes of his listeners in the White House garden and in the whole worlds grew wet, I knew that I would not forget for a long time his words that day:

`We are the victims of war and violence. We have not known a year or a month when mothers have not mourned their sons.'

I feel a tremor that I know so well and which I feel when I know that I have not done my best, that I have failed: Rabin has taken everything, even the story of our death.

This leader knew how to demand that the world should respect Israeli blood, the blood of every Israeli individual without exception. He knew how to demand that the world should respect Israeli tears, and he was able to present Israel as the victim of a crime perpetrated by us. He changed facts, he altered the order of things, he presented us as the initiators of violence in the Middle East and said what he said with eloquence, with clarity and conviction. I remember every word Rabin said that day:

`We, the soldiers coming back from the war, smeared with blood, we saw our brothers and our friends killed in front of us, we attended their funerals unable to look into the eyes of their mothers. Today we remember each one of them with eternal love.'

It is easy to blur the truth with a simple linguistic trick: start your story with `secondly'. Yes, this is what Rabin did. He simply neglected to speak of what happened first. Start your story with "secondly", and the world will be turned upside down. Start your story with `secondly' and the arrows of the Red Indians are the original criminals and the guns of the white men are entirely the victim. It is enough to start with `secondly', for the anger of the black man against the white to be barbarous. Start with `secondly' and Ghandi becomes responsible for the tragedies of the British. You only need to start with `secondly', and the burned Vietnamese will have wounded the humanity of the napalm, and Victor Jara's songs will be the shameful thing and not Pinochet's bullets, which killed so many thousands in the Santiago stadium. It is enough to start the story with `secondly', for my grandmother, Umm `Ata, to become the criminal and Ariel Sharon the victim."

Mourid Barghouti
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 18, 2011 6:02 AM BST


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