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Profile for Ms. K. J. Waghorn > Reviews

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Reviews Written by
Ms. K. J. Waghorn (Brighton)

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Uprooted - A Canadian War Story
Uprooted - A Canadian War Story
by Lynne Reid Banks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book for all ages, 3 Dec. 2014
I didn't realise this was a book for young people ["confident readers"] until I started to read it [I am middle aged!] but it was a really good story that I think anyone would enjoy. Not only did it enlighten me about evacuees who went to Canada [from their point of view], it also made a change from anything else I've ever read. I liked Lindy, Cameron and Alex and was absorbed by their story from beginning to end.


Family Pictures
Family Pictures
by Jane Green
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars good - but could have been better, 20 Nov. 2014
Although I enjoyed this book overall, I did think it could have been better. The minor points that I disliked were the sex references and swearing [there wasn't too much but it grated just the same]. The major flaw [in my opinion] was the lack of explanation of how the husband managed to live a double life [successfully] and then how it all unravelled. What caused his million dollar empire to collapse and why did it happen when it did? Considering the title of the book [in the U.K. it is "The Accidental Husband"] he was just a subsidiary character. I wonder if Ms. Green was unable to describe in detail exactly what happened so she didn't - but it certainly made for a major hole in the story.

However, having said that, this was the first of Ms. Green's novels I have read and I will try others.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 5, 2015 2:23 PM GMT


I Think I Love You
I Think I Love You
Price: £4.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Started well but failed to deliver, 2 Nov. 2014
I thoroughly enjoyed the first half [set in 1974, when the main character [Petra] is 13 and an avid David Cassidy fan, but the second half [1998] was nowhere near as good and dragged on.

The whole point of the story - the adult Petra and her friend, Sharon, meeting their teen idol 24 years too late - was entirely side-stepped. I had been waiting to find out what they talked about and how they felt but Ms Pearson decided not to include this important meeting in her story. We do, however, get a transcription of her interview with David Cassidy which was very interesting but didn't add anything to the novel.

Disappointing, overall.


A Turn in the Road (A Blossom Street Novel)
A Turn in the Road (A Blossom Street Novel)
by Debbie Macomber
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars I also didn't get any clear picture of what any of the three women looked like [Ruth, Bethanne and Annie] because Ms Macomber se, 15 Oct. 2014
I read it to the end but it was too predictable for me. Also, the story unfolds for the most part during a long car journey from Seattle to Florida but there is very little description of the scenery [well there wouldn't be much, would there - just the Rocky Mountains, some desert, some farmland, maybe the Everglades - not a lot to go overboard about]. I also didn't get any clear picture of what any of the three women looked like [Ruth, Bethanne and Annie] because Ms Macomber seems to concentrate entirely on conversation. In fact, the book reads more like a script for a soap opera.


Down Under: Travels in a Sunburned Country (Bryson)
Down Under: Travels in a Sunburned Country (Bryson)
by Bill Bryson
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed this travel book a lot, 2 Oct. 2014
I enjoyed this travel book a lot. Bill Bryson is a very interesting person and travels with a desire to learn and immerse himself in the country - and that's great for those of us who can't travel in person.

I really felt that he enjoyed his time in Australia and was genuinely impressed with the people and the places he stayed in and visited. There are plenty of facts of historical and scientific interest as well as much else that takes all Bill Bryson's books on to a different level.

My only disappointment was the total lack of photographs.


1105 Yakima Street (A Cedar Cove Novel)
1105 Yakima Street (A Cedar Cove Novel)
by Debbie Macomber
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Another enjoyable Cedar Cove novel, 18 Sept. 2014
Another enjoyable book in the Cedar Cove series, where the characters and stories are interesting and people resolve their differences and problems in the best possible way.

These books are easy to read, contain no swearing or scenes of crime and violence and are ideal if you want to take a trip to small-town USA, and mingle with the regulars from the previous ten books.

There are no great surprises but a few twists and turns along the way keep it interesting.


The Last Runaway
The Last Runaway
by Tracy Chevalier
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.27

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent story telling with a lot of period interest., 8 Sept. 2014
This review is from: The Last Runaway (Paperback)
I loved this book, and think it's one of Tracy Chevalier's best. Who is the last runaway? Is it one of the many slaves who leave the deep south and head up north to escape to Canada? Or is it Honor Bright, the English Quaker who leaves her home in Dorset and travels to Ohio for a different life?

How will Honor Bright manage in this frontierland, amongst people she shares a faith with but not necessarily the same views?

Read it and find out!


The Road Headed West: A Cycling Adventure Through North America
The Road Headed West: A Cycling Adventure Through North America
by Leon McCarron
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.97

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 8 Sept. 2014
This book is brilliant. Leon McCarron comes across as a nice guy heading into the sunset on his bike, not knowing what the next day will bring, but daring himself to cope with whatever happens. And he does! He starts out in New York city, unconfident and doubting his resolve to see the trip through, but by the time he reaches Seattle, he's already decided to extend his trip and head down the coast to the Mexican border. He meets fellow cyclists en route, has some adventures, is helped by total strangers and learns more about himself as the journey progresses.

This is an informative travel book which really takes you there - but you don't have to do all the hard work or sleep in a tent by the side of the road for months on end.

I referred to the lovely [handrawn] map frequently, and would have liked a few more photos included within the book, rather than just on the inside of the jacket. Apart from that little gripe, this is a 5 star book and I hope Leon writes more about his travels.


Bonnes Vacances: A Crazy Family Adventure in the French Territories
Bonnes Vacances: A Crazy Family Adventure in the French Territories
by Rosie Millard
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars It's OK - but it could have been better, 8 Sept. 2014
This is an easy to read, fairly amusing book about a family trip [around the world] to visit the French territories. It's informative and interesting but I'm afraid at times I felt quite irritated with Rosie Millard and her blind adoration of everything French. I had to agree with her husband, when he said [p.154] "When will your ridiculous romance about France ever die and be replaced by a willingness to understand reality?"

The 13 week trip took in 6 locations, but they are not all accorded the same attention in this book. The first stop [St Pierre et Muquelon] goes into detail about the location, the hotel, the people and what they do for a living but by the time the family reach the last stop - La Reunion - much of this information is jettisoned and it feels as if the writer just wanted to finish the book quickly.

This was not a restful family holiday - it was more like an endurance test, and I wondered at the wisdom of taking young children on such a trip, especially when their comments showed that they weren't happy at times. Trailing round after their parents [who were filming 6 documentaries for the Travel Channel], they often had to take second place to the work in hand.

This was not a trip that was forced upon Rosie Millard and her family. She chose to do it because of her deep fascination with and love of French language and culture. By the end of the book you may feel [as I did] that she ought to take off her rose-coloured glasses and realise that if something is French it does not automatically mean it's better.

The funniest parts of the book related to the children and their comments on different situations. I am sure they will all remember the trip for the rest of their lives but it might not be with much affection.

The photos included in the paperback book are poor. Which is a shame - a few coloured glossy pages of photos would have been much better.


A Wreath Of Roses (Virago Modern Classics)
A Wreath Of Roses (Virago Modern Classics)
by Elizabeth Taylor
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Of all her books, this is not one of her best, 10 Aug. 2014
Had this been any other Elizabeth Taylor novel [aside from "Angel" which is not typical of her work] I would probably have given this 4 or 5 stars but it is a somewhat morbid, sad story which feels claustrophobic and as stifling as the post-war summer in which it takes place.

Frances, the elderly artist is concerned that her painting days are over, due to rheumatism and old age, and knows that death is on the horizon. Liz is perpetually worried about her new baby, and her ineffectual husband [who is besotted with the womenfolk of his congregation, to Liz's consternation] is a thorn in the side of Liz's best friend, Camilla.

Camilla herself, knowing that she is "on the shelf" [this is 1947 or thereabouts] and desperate for something of a holiday romance becomes entangled with the totally unsuitable Richard who has criminal tendencies and lives his life in a haze of fantasy and bar fumes.

Into the mix comes the lonely but eminently likeable Morland Beddoes, a film director and friend of Frances's, who, being removed from the emotional entanglements of the quintet, observes and understands everyone's troubles and tries to be the voice of reason in the maelstrom which is created when what was once a happy summer holiday appears to be heading for disaster.

The earlier review by Gill, stating that Elizabeth Taylor based this story on a real person is very interesting and can be found in Nicola Beauman's excellent recent biography of Ms Taylor.


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